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  • Zoom H4 Handy Recorder
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Zoom H4 Handy Recorder

by Zoom

List Price: $494.99
Price: $350.00 & FREE Shipping. Details
You Save: $144.99 (29%)
Only 2 left in stock.
Sold by " Recording Solutions " and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
  • Metronome: 5 sounds (Beat: 0/4 - 8/4, 6/8, Tempo: 40.0 - 250.0BPM)
  • A/D Conversion: 24bit, 128times oversampling
  • D/A Conversion: 24bit, 128times oversampling
  • Signal Processing: 32bit
  • Recording Media: SD memory card (16MB-2GB)
3 new from $320.00 6 used from $89.95


Product Details

  • Item Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Shipping Weight: 3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Shipping: This item is also available for shipping to select countries outside the U.S.
  • ASIN: B000LGA2K6
  • Item model number: ZOO H4
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (150 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #35,445 in Musical Instruments (See Top 100 in Musical Instruments)
  • Discontinued by manufacturer: Yes
  • Date first available at Amazon.com: July 30, 2004

Product Description

Amazon.com

Whether you're recording a live performance, a podcast, a class or workshop, a rehearsal, a songwriting session or even a sizzling performance of your band, the H4 has more recording tools available than any device ever made. Weighing a mere 6.7 ounces (190g), the H4 puts a remarkable amount of recording power in the palm of your hand.

Many uses of the Zoom H4 portable stereo recorder
Underneath its sleek exterior are built-in studio effects such as compression, limiting and mic modeling. Use the combination XLR-1/4-inch inputs for external mics, guitars, bass or keyboards. Also onboard are Zoom's most incredible microphone, guitar and bass modeling, accurately reproducing the tone of the most famous microphones and amps ever made. Audio can be recorded as WAV or MP3 files and moved to a computer via USB for easy editing, mixing and mastering.

True stereo imaging:
Stereo recording is often accomplished by using two microphones in a V-shaped set up that faces the performer. While this method will result in good stereo separation, responsiveness for the area directly in front of the mics will be low, causing problems with depth perception and imaging. The Zoom H4 uses an X/Y configuration where the two microphones point inward at a crossing angle. This allows the recorder to cover a wide area, and at the same time capture sound sources in the center with perfect clarity and definition. Phase differences between left and right channels are also eliminated because sound is picked up simultaneously by both microphones.

The Zoom H4 offers true stereo image recording
Absence of phase differences ensures natural stereo imaging

24-bit/96 kHz linear PCM format and MP3 recording:
The H4 allows 24-bit/96 kHz linear PCM recording in WAV format, resulting in excellent transparency and definition that exceeds the sound quality of CDs. This is great for capturing the nuances of an acoustic instrument while preserving the ambience of the recording location. Or record directly as MP3 files for longer recordings that still provide excellent sound quality.

Secure Digital (SD) Media
The H4 records on Secure Digital (SD) Media cards. These widely available cards boast an amazing amount of recording time in a small package. And unlike tape or disc media, mechanical vibrations do not affect recording quality. With a 2GB SD memory card, the H4 can provide up to 190 minutes of stereo WAV file recording in 44.1 kHz/16-bit mode or as many as 34 hours when recording at 128 kbps in MP3 stereo mode.

Combination XLR-1/4" Inputs
The H4, with its two phantom powered XLR-1/4" input jacks that support direct connection of external microphones, is the solution to an infinite number of recording situations. You can also use the H4's Hi-Z rated phone inputs for direct connection of guitars, bass, or any other line-input device.

Product Description

  • Version 2.0 for the ZOOM H4 is available for download and will upgrade the features on all H4 digital recorders. Please click here for instructions on how to download and install.
  • Palm-Sized Unit: The Small Form Factor Allows You to Take the H4 Anywhere
  • Four-Track Recording: Record Multiple Tracks, such as Vocal, Guitar, and Bass, Simultaneously
  • High-Quality Audio: With the Ability to Record WAV at up to 24-bit/96 kHz and MP3 at up to 320kbps, You Never Have to Stand for Sub-Par Audio
  • Stereo Recording with Built-In Microphones: The X/Y Pattern of the Microphones Provides True Stereo Recording
  • Two Microphone Inputs: The Combination XLR-1/4" Phone Jacks with Phantom Power Allow You to Use the Mic of Your Choice
  • Built-In Effects: Compression, Limiting, Mic Modeling and Guitar Amp


  • Customer Questions & Answers

    Customer Reviews

    The controls took a little to get use to, but actually very easy to use.
    R. Townsend-Manning
    We are all very pleased with the sound quality, and so far it has been easy to record and play back.
    Jay Wright
    OK, seriously, if you need something like this and have the money to spend, get the Zoom H4.
    T. Barger

    Most Helpful Customer Reviews

    146 of 156 people found the following review helpful By Tacfarinas on November 22, 2006
    I am new to digital recording; I bought the Zoom to make podcasts, and I wanted both portability and good sound quality. I settled on the Zoom because the phantom power feature meant that I could use the best possible external microphone, should that be necessary. In fact the internal microphones seem to me very good, and they actually produce better sound quality than the external one I have tried (a leftover from my cassette deck days, so perhaps that doesn't mean much).

    The Zoom seems to do its job very well, but I have two big reservations. The first is--and I never thought I would care about such a thing--the ergonomics. The display reminds me of my first PC; the feel of the buttons like my first plastic Walkman, and often there is no sense that one has successfully pushed a button, or made one stop and start (ending a recording is curiously delayed), though you get used to it.

    The second, far more important, problem is the complexity of the interface, combined with documentation that is no doubt very full, but hardly user friendly, especially for novices (who might well be an important target market, so this is odd). The combination of jod dial and (tacky) menu button is not intuitive; there seems no obvious logic to when to use the button and when to use the dial. And the manual has all the clarity of an old printer manual. Even the "Simple Recording Guide" has at a crucial stage "Adjust senstivity with [mic gain]switch," which is probably fine for an experience user but to a novice was slightly opaque. Similarly, the triumphant conclusion "Play the recorded file" is unfortunate; not just because of course there's no speaker, but because headphones gave a misleading impression of the recording levels.

    I'm sure I can use this thing to do the job. But the whole experience has been a steady stream of irritations. Experienced users will perhaps be impressed; novices should simply be prepared to do a bit of homework.
    5 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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    182 of 196 people found the following review helpful By JerryWithaJ on October 26, 2006
    I got both the Zoom H4 and the Edirol R-09. The Zoom goes back, the Edirol stays, even though the Edirol cost $100 more.

    Why, then, 4 stars for the Zoom? I'd really like to give it 3-1/2 stars, so it was a tossup between 3 and 4. However, if you know what you are getting into, the 4 stars are well-deserved.

    The Zoom has a huge variety of features that the Edirol lacks. The Zoom may even sound the slightest bit better (more open, slightly better high end) when both are used to record with their built in mics. However, this functionality comes with a price--a much more complicated interface.

    The Zoom does everything. It records directly to wav and mp3. It's a 4 track recording studio. It serves as computer interface for your guitar. It serves as an effects box. It can emulate four different types of microphones, such as the Shure SM57 and the AKG C414. It's even got a built-in metronome and tuner! If you go to the Samsontech website, you can download the manual in PDF format and be truly amazed.

    In order to do all this, the Zoom H4's buttons and controls must necessarily be multi-function. On top of that, it adds a jog dial (like the wheel on a mouse: slide in either direction to change menu choices, push to select the current choice). It is necessary to go two levels deep in the menus to set recording levels manually. The Edirol R-09's interface is so simple and intuitive that many could use it without even looking at the manual. Since all I was looking for was a recorder, the Edirol was the easy choice for me.

    The Edirol is quite rightly criticized for how awkward it is to insert and remove batteries. In theory, it's a lot easier to do with the Zoom H4. In practice, I found it just as awkward.
    Read more ›
    4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
    Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
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    114 of 122 people found the following review helpful By JerryWithaJ on October 26, 2006
    I got both the Zoom H4 and the Edirol R-09. The Zoom goes back, the Edirol stays, even though the Edirol cost $100 more.

    Why, then, 4 stars for the Zoom? I'd really like to give it 3-1/2 stars, so it was a tossup between 3 and 4. However, if you know what you are getting into, the 4 stars are well-deserved.

    The Zoom has a huge variety of features that the Edirol lacks. The Zoom may even sound the slightest bit better (more open, slightly better high end) when both are used to record with their built in mics. However, this functionality comes with a price--a much more complicated interface.

    The Zoom does everything. It records directly to wav and mp3. It's a 4 track recording studio. It serves as computer interface for your guitar. It serves as an effects box. It can emulate four different types of microphones, such as the Shure SM57 and the AKG C414. It's even got a built-in metronome and tuner! If you go to the Samsontech website, you can download the manual in PDF format and be truly amazed.

    In order to do all this, the Zoom H4's buttons and controls must necessarily be multi-function. On top of that, it adds a jog dial (like the wheel on a mouse: slide in either direction to change menu choices, push to select the current choice). It is necessary to go two levels deep in the menus to set recording levels manually. The Edirol R-09's interface is so simple and intuitive that many could use it without even looking at the manual. Since all I was looking for was a recorder, the Edirol was the easy choice for me.

    The Edirol is quite rightly criticized for how awkward it is to insert and remove batteries. In theory, it's a lot easier to do with the Zoom H4. In practice, I found it just as awkward.
    Read more ›
    2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
    Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
    Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

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