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asked by MEJazz on January 8, 2012
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Zach S. answered on January 24, 2012
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Most people have crop-sensor cameras not FF so lets say in the context of crop-sensor. Yes 60mm is slow at f/2.8 and yes background separation is not as good as even 50 1.8; but it does doubles as a Macro lens and is very sharp. I used 60mm with bounced speedlite indoors and results are spectacular for portraits - head shots. I now have 30mm 1.4, 60m 2.8, 85mm 1.8 as my primes. Just debating if that long end (85mm) is really needed with these others. I do feel 50 1.4 or even 1.8 will be better as a portrait lens instead of 60mm but i just love its sharpness.
MEJazz answered on January 24, 2012
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MEJazz: It's not completely necessary, but for someone whose bread and butter is studio headshots, it's probably a good idea.. Of course whether someone should have one is a question of style and whether the cost justifies it. The way I think about this sort of question is does it, in a purely mathematical sense, give me anything extra, and how long will it take for that investment to pay off. I think for you, you may not need the 85 (although I love the Canon 85 f/1.8 it's got such beautiful bokeh and is very sharp).
Zach S. answered on January 25, 2012
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MEJazz answered on January 25, 2012
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