Was anyone else completely let down by this predominant snoozer? Was anyone else completely let down by this predominant snoozer? Sure, the concept was incredible (almost epistolary-esque) but the majority of the novel was tedious, at best. The last 75 pages saved the book from a two star review. I don't understand where everyone is coming from with the blood, guts, and gore ideas. The book didn't contain all that much--save a few chapters. Most of it was tedious information that became too boring. I guess that that comment isn't fair. The book was predominantly BORING. I thought it was to be about zombies attacking the world and it turned into a political bull fest. So sad b/c it had true potential.
[UPDATED] asked by Dave H on November 27, 2006
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This book affected me deeply. It's not easy to scare me, but each time I took a break, I was left with such a feeling of hopelessness. For example, while riding a commuter ferry to Boston, I happened to be reading the chapter narrated by the gentleman charged with rebuilding the US infrastructure. The ferry was packed with well-dressed power brokers - exactly the people whose skills would be utterly useless in the face of such an apocalyptic breakdown. All day long, through every contentious meeting (and I had many), all I could think was "do any of you arrogant jerks even know how to swing a hammer?"

Nope, this book doesn't have bunches of gore, and yet I found it utterly terrifying. If I had to make any criticism at all, it would be that changes in 'voice' from interviewee to interviewee weren't always as sharp as they could have been. Oh, and I loved the dig Mr. Brooks took at his own Survival Guide. It was nice to have a chuckle break.
Elizabeth L. Weeks answered on November 5, 2007

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I'd have to agree with the other responses. I think you were just looking for something very different from this book. I read and loved the Zombie Survival Guide years back, and always loved most the stories about "real" historical situations that made up a portion of it. WWZ is exactly what I wanted out of another book from Brooks. He takes the idea of a zombie fueled apocalypse, that has been done a billion times over, and infuses it with a believability that is shocking, and makes you actually wonder how you would really react in the situation, and not in a fantasy "I'd barricade myself in the mall" way. I never expected, nor wanted gore or even actual frights from this book. It isn't supposed to be that kind of book.
Timmy K. answered on April 6, 2007

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I don't agree with your comment. I've never heard anyone say that this was a gory book and I don't understand how you could dismiss it so quickly. The political, psychological, and emotional facets in this book should be enough to warrant another read. Maybe it was advertised to you wrong.

That "tedious information" is what grounds the book, making it real. Max Brooks did a fantastic job and in the foot steps of George A Romero he is able to comment on socioeconomic unrest and politics in not just one country but the whole world. This book isn't as much about zombies as it is about people's reactions and the consequences of those reactions. How else would you portray political and socioeconomic strife in the world? You don't want to pit one country or one race or one religion or one faction against another and pawn the blame on someone else. If this could happen to anyone, anywhere...isn't that terrifying?
CeruleanGrey answered on November 20, 2007

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I completely disagree. The accounts were riveting from page 1. The different characters, the details, all grounded in reality which helped me to suspend disbelief. The subtle political commentary was excellent as well.
D. Hammond answered on January 26, 2007

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Yes, a gripping story from first to last. Not to slight genre writers, but Max Brooks is way too intelligent and sophisticated to just be writing zombie novels. He manages to put elements of the horror of the walking dead in each snippet of "interview," while at the same time working out, plausibly, the human and political response to the monsters destroying and devouring human civilization. Not for people who want their zombie stories to be all about gore, death, and despair. Brooks counterposes the nihilist view of much of zombie fiction with respect for humans trying and sometimes finding the strength to to fight back.
Midland answered on February 4, 2007

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""Not to slight genre writers, but Max Brooks is way too intelligent and sophisticated to just be writing zombie novels""

shhhhhhh! don't tell him that! I want more!!! hehe

Anyway, I have to disagree with the OP also, this book was great, I've read it many many times now. No, it's not action packed zombie fightin from start to finish, if thats what you want there are a ton of great books out there that are just that. This book gives us the "big picture", its not titled "a zombie survivors story", it is a history of the entire war, and it does what it set out to do perfectly.

But everyone has their own opinion, I'm sure my wife wouldn't get through the first chapter. But for me, 10/10.
doz70 answered on July 23, 2008

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I was let down as well. But then again, I started this book right after I finisher "One Second After". There is NO comparison. One Second After actually scared the Hell out of me, kept me up after i read it. To all the post-apocolyptic lovers out there - please pick that one up fast !
Mike answered on August 11, 2010

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I've only listened to the Audiobook -- but that *sounded* tedious. And the Chinese Doctor's accent was just terrible.
matt answered on August 2, 2009

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Absolutely agree. I made the mistake of buying the survival guide and wwz together. Loved the concept of both but couldn't finish the survival guide and really disliked the overt politics of wwz.
Zeke answered on March 18, 2010

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Just finished the book.

Overall was good. My main problem is, for such a well detailed novel, he was woefully slack on the virus itself, and on following his own "rules" of the virus.

Prime example was when Colonel Christina Eliopolis find her co-pilot in the tree that has been dead a minute or two "wakes up". Where other characters take much much longer to make the conversion.
S. Michel answered on March 12, 2010
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