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Showing 1-10 of 153 questions
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This is not as much of a weight issue as most people point out. Modern flat tops can handle the weight no problem unless you drop (even from a 1/4" height) or drag the canner.
The bigger issue is heat retention. If the canner is significantly larger than the heating element, then heat can build up in the surrounding … see more
This is not as much of a weight issue as most people point out. Modern flat tops can handle the weight no problem unless you drop (even from a 1/4" height) or drag the canner.
The bigger issue is heat retention. If the canner is significantly larger than the heating element, then heat can build up in the surrounding ceramic or glass (heat goes from the heating filament to the canner, spreads to the edge of the canner's bottom surface and then transfers to and heats the surrounding area). If this happens, there are some possible (I stress possible, every flattop is different) undesirable outcomes. First possibility, if your flattop has an auto shutoff for overheating, you will be hard pressed to maintain pressure because the filament will shut off until the flattop has cooled. Second possibility, if your flattop does not have an auto shutoff for overheating, the surrounding glass or ceramic can crack from overheating, even causing failure of your heating element.
If your heating filament is smaller than the cooker by only about an inch or so, you should be fine, but if there canner covers a significant area of your flattop that is not the heating element, you might reconsider see less

By Erik Pitman on March 11, 2014
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It will hold 4 of the typical Mason 1/2 gallon jars. (I went and tested their fit in mine... no way to squeeze 5 in...)
By CBnL on December 23, 2014
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Hi, my stove is electric and i do just fine. I use the largest burner. I've heard from others that sometimes the heat temp is hard to maintain, but i dont have that problem. Here's what I do: I turn my electric burner on HIGH (like #9) to get it going. After i vent the valve for 10 minutes and put the weighted gauge on… see more Hi, my stove is electric and i do just fine. I use the largest burner. I've heard from others that sometimes the heat temp is hard to maintain, but i dont have that problem. Here's what I do: I turn my electric burner on HIGH (like #9) to get it going. After i vent the valve for 10 minutes and put the weighted gauge on I wait for it to come to 10lbs pressure (10lbs is for my altitude below 1000'). AFTER the gauge reads 10lbs of pressure I turn my burner down to #5 (which is like MEDIUM). Each and every time I've done it this way the pressure remained the same. Sometimes I would have to turn it up to 5 1/2, as 6 was too much heat. You must stay wit h the canner for the whole time you are using it to make sure it maintains the right pressure for whatever you are canning. I did have a glass top stove but i never canned on it. It cracked one day while i was boiling water. For me, I would not can on an electric glass stove. Hope this helps. see less
By Connie McCaffery on January 4, 2014
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I bgt a camp chef 2 burner just for canning b cuz it has 15 k btu output of heat, this makes canning faster for me. My glass top stove takes 4 ever to heat up the canner & so difficult maintaining proper pressure. Its set up in my kitchen & I am a happy canner. A friend who is a master canner uses this method & tol… see more I bgt a camp chef 2 burner just for canning b cuz it has 15 k btu output of heat, this makes canning faster for me. My glass top stove takes 4 ever to heat up the canner & so difficult maintaining proper pressure. Its set up in my kitchen & I am a happy canner. A friend who is a master canner uses this method & told me about it. So easy just make sure your propane tank is full b 4 starting. see less
By P. Salmons on July 16, 2015
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Yes, many people use internal containers.
By Balkowitsch Enterprises on June 28, 2015 SELLER
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I'm probably too late to help you, but tomatoes can be water bath canned (which is probably why the recommend not using the pressure gauge and having the hot water bath up above the lids). I use a large tamale pot. You don't actually need the pressure canner for tomatoes. Some directions recommend it for a shorter cann… see more I'm probably too late to help you, but tomatoes can be water bath canned (which is probably why the recommend not using the pressure gauge and having the hot water bath up above the lids). I use a large tamale pot. You don't actually need the pressure canner for tomatoes. Some directions recommend it for a shorter canning time, but results are very good with the straight water bath and a little lemon juice for higher acid. see less
By Neferset on May 1, 2009
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I almost never can any of those, but it is certainly a pressure canner, which people certainly use for canning fish and meat -- I see recipes for those, and comments from people who use the All American for that. I don't hear great things about canning shrimp, but if you want to do it, the All American should be able to.
By Geoffrey Wiseman on September 27, 2013
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Sure, just don't tighten the locks and make sure steam can escape.
By mrbeveridgesmaggot on May 29, 2014
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It is well suited for a gas range. I use mine over a propane turkey fryer with no issues. Personally I would love to use mine over a gas range, but unfortunately I have a glass top range. Hope this helps
By Lance Goodthrust on March 3, 2014
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You should get your recipes from a reliable, tested source such as a county or state extension office or from a new canning book (such as from the Ball company). These recipes have been tested to make sure they can at a long enough time and correct pressure to safely kill all unsafe microorganisms.
By Sara Bonnette on September 28, 2015