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If your food blogging involves discreetly photographing restaurant meals, then you may want something much wider than the 50mm f/1.8, which will have the same coverage as a full-frame 80mm lens on your Rebel T3. A 20mm or 24mm would be great, but for much less money, the newer Canon "pancake lens," the 40mm f/2.8, is f… see more If your food blogging involves discreetly photographing restaurant meals, then you may want something much wider than the 50mm f/1.8, which will have the same coverage as a full-frame 80mm lens on your Rebel T3. A 20mm or 24mm would be great, but for much less money, the newer Canon "pancake lens," the 40mm f/2.8, is fabulously sharp, takes gorgeous photos, is the smallest (physically shortest) lens in the entire Canon range, and doesn't cost much more than the 50 f/1.8 ($149 after $50 rebate as of August 2014). Before buying anything, check out some sample photos of any lens you are considering by going to dpreview or pbase and doing a search. They've saved me hundreds of dollars and immeasurable disappointment by getting to see the quality of pictures taken with a specific lens. In the latter, search by camera, choose Canon, and scroll down to see examples of photos taken with the lenses you are most interested in. Then you can come back to Amazon to purchase a lens you *know* will do the job for you. Happy blogging! see less
By Mark Hubbard on August 3, 2014
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I suppose we all have different, and valid, preferences in focal length. This lens is equivalent to an 80mm in 35mm format, and that's always been the right length for a portrait lens for me. But I think a 100mm equivalent also works well for many people. The kind of distortion noted here comes when you're too close to… see more I suppose we all have different, and valid, preferences in focal length. This lens is equivalent to an 80mm in 35mm format, and that's always been the right length for a portrait lens for me. But I think a 100mm equivalent also works well for many people. The kind of distortion noted here comes when you're too close to the subject and you're trying to fill the frame. This is especially a problem with the old "standard" 35mm focal length in 35mm format. Does bad things with noses especially. see less
By Writer on May 25, 2015
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It works perfectly with my Rebel. It's really awesome for portraits and you won't have to stand a crazy distance away from them. Trust me, any inconvenience of having to stand a bit further back will be tempered by the quality of image you get from this glass. This lens stays on my camera body like 60% of the time at least.
By Jonathan E Garcia on August 13, 2013
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Yes, I own one too, and it's a perfect duel
By Fady Soliman on May 23, 2015
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I found it great for low light portraits. Also for flower, plants or animals as long as they don't move much. This lens gives you great depth of field but the focus it's quite poor. Also great for low light scenes.
By Pablo Sierra on July 10, 2014
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Depends. What do you want to do with it? The 50mm 1.8 won't give you any real advantages over the 85mm 1.8; any shot you can take with the 50mm 1.8 you can take with the 85mm 1.8, you just have to step back a bit further to take the same photo. Otherwise it pretty much performs the same. If you're constrained on ho… see more Depends. What do you want to do with it? The 50mm 1.8 won't give you any real advantages over the 85mm 1.8; any shot you can take with the 50mm 1.8 you can take with the 85mm 1.8, you just have to step back a bit further to take the same photo. Otherwise it pretty much performs the same. If you're constrained on how far you can step back, the 50mm might be a good option. At 400 grams, the 85mm weighs more than double the 133 grams of the 50mm, so if weight is a critical issue, that might be a factor as well. The only other thing I can think of that would matter (to me, at least) is if you're ever planning on walking around with one lens on your camera, and taking photos of whatever you see. Changing lenses takes time, which means missed opportunities for photos unless you're in a controlled environment. In my experience, I'm much happier walking around with a lens around 50mm (as it gives a view more like what my eye is seeing) than an 85mm (zooms in more); however, if I'm walking around with just one lens I usually have a zoom lens like 24-105mm to have more versatility.
Bottom line: The 85mm f/1.8 lens is a very good lens for portraits, and you probably won't gain a lot from the 50mm if portraits are all you are interested in shooting. The 50mm is good, but you'll have to think about how you're going to use the lens to see if you need it. see less

By Michael J. Wood on March 10, 2014
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There is a "Will This Work with Your Camera?" box under the product specifications, enter you camera model in there. This lens is an EF (vs. an EF-S) mount so I'm pretty sure it would work on all canon EOS DSLRs (whereas EF-S lenses will not work on full frame cameras and are only made for the cheaper cropped frame ca… see more There is a "Will This Work with Your Camera?" box under the product specifications, enter you camera model in there. This lens is an EF (vs. an EF-S) mount so I'm pretty sure it would work on all canon EOS DSLRs (whereas EF-S lenses will not work on full frame cameras and are only made for the cheaper cropped frame cameras). I hope this helps! see less
By Ashley on February 13, 2015
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I've only used this a couple of times but I would say no. This is more for portraits and it makes one object the main focus.
By Amber L. Ghent on October 3, 2013
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It is fantastic for newborn photography as you are able to focus on a smaller subject. It also works great for portrait photography it just takes a little bit of getting used to moving back and forth to get the right composition because it does not zoom.
By brandon johnson on January 7, 2015