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  • 25
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This device, the P4400, will reset all of its timed measurement values to zero if power is lost or the device is unplugged. The P4460 has "non volatile" memory, using a battery to provide the necessary voltage to power the (S)RAM memory, which means that it will not lose the data if power to the 4460 is lost. The P4460… see more This device, the P4400, will reset all of its timed measurement values to zero if power is lost or the device is unplugged. The P4460 has "non volatile" memory, using a battery to provide the necessary voltage to power the (S)RAM memory, which means that it will not lose the data if power to the 4460 is lost. The P4460 also will let you input the cost per KWH from your provider to calculate the cost to operate the appliance over a week, month and year (assuming that your use is the same during the extrapolated period as it was during the measurement period). For me the data retention feature is well worth the extra $4 since I want to keep track of the energy used by a window air conditioner which will vary by the outdoor temperature, the sun hitting the building, the humidity, etc. see less
By Richard E. Snyder on June 18, 2014
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The rateing of 15amps refers to the appliance being rated not the outlet rating. If what you want to measure is rated at 1800 watts or less it will measure the useage. Look on the appliance if it says 1800 watts or less, or, if it is rated at 15amps or less it will work. Hope this helps
By Michael Simpson on December 25, 2013
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Yes, it will work with 2 prong circuits . The meter itself has 3 prongs, so to plug it into a 2 prong outlet, you'll have to use an adapter or suitable 2 wire extension cord . The prongs on the meter are not polarized ( i.e. they're the same size) which makes plugging in a 2 wire extension cord easier.
By Sam on May 1, 2014
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it can give instantaneous readouts so just have somone watch it while applying your peak load, you can also see what voltage your outlet is deliveringa and at what frequency, not all outlets are equal and power company delivery can be uneven.
By 50somethingMGR on April 2, 2014
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Your statement is just telling you what each cost is for each kilowatt of electricity you are using. When you add the KWH charge $0.06912 + distribution charge $0.05003=$0.11915 cents or about 12 cents per KiloWatt Hour(KWH) which is the same as suing 1000 watts in one hour. (1 KWH=1000 watts per hour). So if your devi… see more Your statement is just telling you what each cost is for each kilowatt of electricity you are using. When you add the KWH charge $0.06912 + distribution charge $0.05003=$0.11915 cents or about 12 cents per KiloWatt Hour(KWH) which is the same as suing 1000 watts in one hour. (1 KWH=1000 watts per hour). So if your device is using 1 kilowatt per hour (which is equal to 1000 watts in one hour), then you are paying about $0.12 cents for each one (1) hour of use. If the KWH is higher, say 2 kilowatts (2000 watts per hour) then it costs you around $0.24 cents per hour to run that appliance. If you measured 2400 watts or 2.4 KW on your monitor over a 24 hour period (which is equal to 100 watts per hour) then it costs you only $0.288 (approx 29 cents) per day to operate. The math would be 2.4 kilowatts per day x $0.12 per KW = $0.288 per day to operate. If this same appliance ran for 30 days, it would cost you $8.64 per month to run. ($0.288 per day x 30 days=$8.64 in one month). Hope this explains it better.
Note: You can't enter a value into your Kill a Watt electricity usage monitor. It only instantaneously measures and displays the power (in units of watts) being used by a device that is plugged into it. Power is measured as amperage multiplied by the voltage. The monitor is actually measuring both the amperage (current) used by the device and the voltage used by the device. It multiplies these two values together to display the power in watts. So if a device uses 1 amp of current times 120 volts=120 watts of power. This equates to about 1.44 cents per hour. The math calculation is 120/1000 x $0.12 per KWH=$0.0144 cents per hour. The monitor also can measure how many total watts are used over a period of time which would be displayed as a cumulative total of watts. If you plugged a device into the monitor for a long time, say one month and it measured a total of 10,000 watts for the month (=10 KW per month) then you can calculate that this device used 10KW per month x $0.12 per KWH= $1.20 per month to operate. see less

By Robert D Fischer on March 29, 2013
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There's another version that does the math for you, I think. With this cheaper version, you do the math yourself. Once you put the formula in a spreadsheet, though, you can just copy-n-paste for each device you measure. And this way you can customize the math for exactly your electric rates, instead of some national average.
By Glenn Linderman on March 13, 2014
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Not 220. Cannot use for dryer or electric stove.
By Joyce Dowtin on September 25, 2014
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John,
The P4400 does not work with 240 volt appliances. It is designed for 115 volt and the maximum voltage is 125.
See P4400 data sheet at http://ec1.images-amazon.com/media/i3d/01/A/man-migrate/MANUAL000010953.pdf

By iPaces Tax Free Store on August 20, 2013 SELLER
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One last thought; as long as the AC 50/60 cy power source is at the male plug and the power draw is on the face plug the P4400 will work fine, no matter what the supply is.
By William G. Wilbur on June 20, 2013
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The spec saying it is powered by "air" is nothing more than a marketing gimmick. The unit is actually powered by the same 120V/60Hz line that is powering the device being monitored.
By George Mortimer on January 3, 2014