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Alejandro, Yes you can take pictures with some limitations. I have take marvelous pictures, but you need to sue a DSLR and you will have to purchase, from Celestron, a T-ring (part #93419) for $10.36 and the T-Adapter for $21.95. You thread these two items together and connect one end to your camer and the other end … see more Alejandro, Yes you can take pictures with some limitations. I have take marvelous pictures, but you need to sue a DSLR and you will have to purchase, from Celestron, a T-ring (part #93419) for $10.36 and the T-Adapter for $21.95. You thread these two items together and connect one end to your camer and the other end threads onto your telescope after you take the visual back off of the scope. You can easily photograph the Moon, I suggest that you take pictures of a partial moon. Run some tests and try different exposures. If you can afford a solar filter from Orion, you can take pictures of the Sun. Taking pictures of deep sky objects is difficult with an Alt-Azimuth mount, like the NexStar, but you should be able to get pcitures of Venus, Jupiter, the Pleiades and a few others, as long as you can shoot with a very high ISO. I hope this helps. One other thing that is very vlauable to purchase is the Celestron focal reducer, it will allow more light and widen your angle of view. Do some research on Prime focus photography with the NexStar 6. see less
By StarDale on January 28, 2014
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I guess you could do that but it wouldn't be very stable. It depends what you are trying to do. if you want to point it to the moon or bright objects then I guess it would work. Deep space and astrophotography would require you to put it on the tripod. The tripod that it comes with is very good quality and very stable.
By CMAN on May 29, 2013
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Yes, it is motorized. You have an alignment process and once aligned the telescope will track whatever you have slewed to - stars, planets, nebulae and galaxies. The hand controller has a built in menu and for example if you select the moon the telescope will automatically slew (move and point) to the moon and then k… see more Yes, it is motorized. You have an alignment process and once aligned the telescope will track whatever you have slewed to - stars, planets, nebulae and galaxies. The hand controller has a built in menu and for example if you select the moon the telescope will automatically slew (move and point) to the moon and then keep the telescope pointed on the moon until you go to another object. see less
By M42 on December 21, 2014
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Definitely! Saturn is spectacular, Mars, Venus, and Jupiter all show a disk. The othe planets appear as bright stars.
By morning time on August 8, 2014
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I advise you to go to the Sky & Telescope website. They offer a course in amateur astrophotography.
By Rich on November 22, 2013
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The alt/azimuth drive tracks an object to keep it centered in the eyepiece. The problem with photographing the object is that the object rotates in the field of view. Short term (2 or 3 seconds) astrophotography of bright objects (the moon, bright planets) may yield an acceptable image, but that means dim objects suc… see more The alt/azimuth drive tracks an object to keep it centered in the eyepiece. The problem with photographing the object is that the object rotates in the field of view. Short term (2 or 3 seconds) astrophotography of bright objects (the moon, bright planets) may yield an acceptable image, but that means dim objects such as stars and galaxies are next to impossible. The Equatorial mounting uses the same tracking electronics to move the telescope in only 1 direction (declination). The result is that an object will remain centered in the field of view and will NOT rotate thus making much longer exposure times possible. Remember, though, the telescope is not the only variable in astrophotography. There's the wind, light pollution, vibration of the mounting, accuracy in setting up the mounting, and fatigue. It ain't easy. see less
By James A. Billings on June 3, 2014
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You can see them fairly clear, i'll put a link at the bottom of my comment to a guy who takes photo's with his 4se. Keep in mind, when you're looking through the scope, the view is not as fuzzy as his photos and video. You can't magnify much more than 150x with the 4se but you can see Saturn with it's rings, and Jupite… see more You can see them fairly clear, i'll put a link at the bottom of my comment to a guy who takes photo's with his 4se. Keep in mind, when you're looking through the scope, the view is not as fuzzy as his photos and video. You can't magnify much more than 150x with the 4se but you can see Saturn with it's rings, and Jupiter very clearly. I'm not sure what the other person is talking about the motors jumping, mine tracks beautifully. This is a great starter scope, but, I also agree there are way better ones out there. For a first scope just to get you familiar with the sky and Astronomy, the 4se works great. If you're like me though, you'll probably want something bigger and faster within a year. I'm actually thinking about selling my 4se to step up to a much higher end scope for Astrophotography. May I ask where you're from?
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7LIfGL0G50jj7sP_aktkHA see less

By Rmarolla33 on October 30, 2014
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For a better experience you should be far from a huge city as LA.
By Roberto C. F. Bof on December 17, 2014
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Actually, in even a modest telescope, i.e., a 120mm refractor with a 30mm eyepiece, Jupiter will appear the size of a pea held at arm's length. The same scope with a 15mm eyepiece will render Mars about the same size... much more than 'a point of light'.
However, to view any detail whatsoever on Mars, (or Jupiter) you'… see more
Actually, in even a modest telescope, i.e., a 120mm refractor with a 30mm eyepiece, Jupiter will appear the size of a pea held at arm's length. The same scope with a 15mm eyepiece will render Mars about the same size... much more than 'a point of light'.
However, to view any detail whatsoever on Mars, (or Jupiter) you'd need a very dark and still sky, with virtually no light polution... an extremely rare set of circumstances.
Once, at the Roper Mountain Observatory, I observed a global dust storm on Mars. We could actually see it advancing across the planet's surface. But conditions were ideal, and that scope is a huge Alvan Clark refractor.
No combination of telescope/filter/eyepiece will render planetary detail if conditions aren't at least good-to-excellent.
Hope this answers your question,
Bill see less

By Bill Wiegert on October 23, 2014
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All you will need is the lens that comes with the telescope. But you will need other lenses if you want to see fine details, like the divisions in the rings around Saturn. I'd also buy a moonlight filter for the lens.
By Jeffrey Tidwell on August 18, 2014