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Answer:
This radio operates on two different frequency categories: GMRS & FRS. This radio does not operate on the CB (Citizens Band) frequencies. You will not be able to listen or speak to anyone on the citizens band frequencies.
The General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) is a North American land-mobile FM UHF radio service desi… see more
This radio operates on two different frequency categories: GMRS & FRS. This radio does not operate on the CB (Citizens Band) frequencies. You will not be able to listen or speak to anyone on the citizens band frequencies.
The General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) is a North American land-mobile FM UHF radio service designed for short-distance two-way communication. It requires a license in United States but can be used license-free in Canada. The United States permits use by an adult individual who possesses a valid GMRS license, as well as his or her immediate family members.[1] Immediate relatives of the GMRS system licensee are entitled to communicate among themselves for personal or business purposes, but employees of the licensee, who are not family members, are not covered by the same license. In 2010 the Federal Communications Commission posed removing the individual licensing requirement. As of August 2013 no final action has been taken.
Family Radio Service (FRS) radios, and share the FRS frequency band near 462 and 467 MHz. Mobile and base station-style radios are available as well, but these are normally commercial UHF radios as often used in the public service and commercial land mobile bands. These are legal for use in this service as long as they are GMRS type-approved. They are more expensive than the walkie talkies typically found in discount electronics stores, and are generally considered higher quality.
GMRS & FRS radios are typically handheld portable devices.
If citizens band frequency is our your goal, then you will need to purchase a citizens band radio. Frankly, I would say skip it because citizens band frequencies are cluttered with foul mouthed clutter. If you are interested in exploring over the radio, you might find it more entertaining too purchase a radio that can receive shortwave and long wave frequencies typically called "ham radios". You need a license to transmit on ham radio frequencies, but you do not need a license to receive. There are many radios available that receive shortwave and long wave ham radio. You will need to brush up on your foreign languages if you expect you to understand some of it. Remember, with ham radio you are receiving signals from across the world as well as locally. That's part of what makes it more interesting.
Good luck to you and enjoy. see less

By Pen Name on October 20, 2013
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Anything GMRS that transmits with over ½ watt (500 milliwatt) effective radiated power will require a license. This unit is 4-5 watts. Any U.S. citizen is eligible for the license. No test required. Your GMRS license covers your entire family. The only exception is in the event of an emergency you do not need to h… see more Anything GMRS that transmits with over ½ watt (500 milliwatt) effective radiated power will require a license. This unit is 4-5 watts. Any U.S. citizen is eligible for the license. No test required. Your GMRS license covers your entire family. The only exception is in the event of an emergency you do not need to have the license. In a life threatening emergency it is legal to use this without a license. The range depends on obstructions such as buildings and trees. Consider it mostly line of sight. In town you can get a few blocks or more. In open country you might go over a mile or more. USA - license required. Range, pretty good for this type of 2-way radio. If you want better range get a HAM radio. see less
By coltswalker on June 1, 2015
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I have an iPhone. This is unable to charge. Try Goal Zero solar panels-very small and work well.
By L. James Miller on April 12, 2014
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2 tps for 90 sec = 60 minutes charge time is what the specs say
By Amazon Customer on December 1, 2013
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The crank is used to recharge the batteries, so it doesn't directly power the radio. It takes quite a bit of cranking (at a low effort level) to get much charge built up. But it's a good feature to have on an emergency radio.
By John Allen on December 4, 2013
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I have not had to use it in an emergency, but I believe it would do well. It is full 2-way on the FRS/GMRS UHF band.
By Burt on August 22, 2015
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No idea I got rid of it plastic toy
By Cyrus on December 31, 2013
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Check your power switch settings. Make sure the battery switch is on rechargeable and not alkaline. If that isn't the problem, then you have a bad battery pack.
By Robert D. Cole on July 6, 2014
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I wish I could help you, but I have no idea. My radio was terrible, and would not work. Couldn't get
any good reception on AM>FM or any of the other frequencies. Finally ended up throwing it away. For me, it was a waste of money. Hope you have better luck. Sorry, I wasn't more help. Smokey

By Harry Miller on May 16, 2014
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yes, just like in the picture. It has a handle like a CB.
By JeanH on August 7, 2015