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I bought my SX120IS a month ago, and I think it is a great camera for the money, a sure "best value" choice. The zoom lens is a key feature, as even 10x telephoto images look flawless. Note that the range of shooting distance of this camera is more than three times that of 3x zoom, and so very far away subjects can be … see more I bought my SX120IS a month ago, and I think it is a great camera for the money, a sure "best value" choice. The zoom lens is a key feature, as even 10x telephoto images look flawless. Note that the range of shooting distance of this camera is more than three times that of 3x zoom, and so very far away subjects can be photographed. What is more, the SX120IS is a camera for a beginner to grow on, because it can be used in several automatic modes or in manual mode. The latter has gives the photographer control of ISO, shutter speed, aperture, white balance, flash output, burst shooting rate, exposure bracketing, ISO/aperture/shutter setting priority modes, image stabilization, and more. In addition to manual mode, there is a Program mode that enables the photographer to save any configuration of settings for future use, such as one created for a particular indoor location where the the lighting does not vary. In short, the SX120IS is a very versatile camera that suits the beginner as well as the seasoned amateur and one that will produce about any photograph a non-professional may be inclined to attempt. It does not succeed at the extremes of fast motion or low light. Compared to professional-grade cameras, the SX120 has a relatively small CCD photocell, and this makes for images that are more coarse-grained at high ISOs. The greatest limitation of this camera is the absence of the RAW format option for recording photos, and this reduces the range and precision of effects when manipulating the digital image with Photostop or other software. Still, a lot can be done with 10 megapixel images saved in JPG which is how the SX120IS records them. Needless to say, it does not have all the features of a $1000 camera, but the SX120IS sure beats all others for sale at a discount price of around $200. see less
By Douglas A. Nimtz on March 21, 2010
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I'm using 16 GB. I don't know if there's a maximum.
By No Whites Baking on December 16, 2013
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Yes it can, go into menu, go to tools by the wheel,click right to achieve,then click down to date/time enter d/m/y. Time,it will automatically save to set OK.very easy to program, for now! J.R. Massachusetts
By james R on August 15, 2013
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There is no real difference betweeen the two, other than adding the newer digic 4 processor (replacing the older digic 3 processor on the SX110). I don't think this is worth a premium over the SX110. As already discussed in other discussion page, the sensor is slightly smaller (BAD!), and they upped the megapixel to 10… see more There is no real difference betweeen the two, other than adding the newer digic 4 processor (replacing the older digic 3 processor on the SX110). I don't think this is worth a premium over the SX110. As already discussed in other discussion page, the sensor is slightly smaller (BAD!), and they upped the megapixel to 10 (up from 9 -- almost useless).
I really don't understand Canon why they released this camera without anything really worth upgrading from the SX110. I would rather recommend you the SX200, which have much more features, like wide angle, longer zoom, proprietary battery so you can see battery meter on LCD (unlike with the AA batteries), has quicker flash recharge time, speaker is placed on better position, has additional features like color swap, color options like vivid red/blue/green, you can erase part of a movie, and is slimmer. Or, if you want more pro but not going DSLR way, check out the new G11. see less

By Good_Person on August 23, 2009
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I use the excellent Eneloop AA NiMH rechargeable battery in all our AA-using cameras (Canon PowerShots and Lumix) and have no complaints. The Sanyo chargers sold with Eneloop cells are good; the Duracell CEF23 charger and the LaCrosse BC-700 charger/tester are both excellent.
"Direct charge" (charging a camera's batt… see more
I use the excellent Eneloop AA NiMH rechargeable battery in all our AA-using cameras (Canon PowerShots and Lumix) and have no complaints. The Sanyo chargers sold with Eneloop cells are good; the Duracell CEF23 charger and the LaCrosse BC-700 charger/tester are both excellent.
"Direct charge" (charging a camera's battery while it's still in the camera) ties up the camera during the charge process, and it is a system to be avoided if at all possible.
All of our cameras have aux power in jacks or aux power in adapters. These are used for tethered shooting or with external battery packs. Few users need this feature, but it can be useful for things like time-lapse photography and lengthy continuous video. see less

By OldAmazonian on November 14, 2009
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I am a Canon fan but I´ve seen the Sony in action and it beats Canon. The downside is the battery and the memory, it does not work with AA and it only uses memory stick. Canon works with AA which you can get anywhere and beleive me, you will run out your battery when you least expect it and you can work an SD card with… see more I am a Canon fan but I´ve seen the Sony in action and it beats Canon. The downside is the battery and the memory, it does not work with AA and it only uses memory stick. Canon works with AA which you can get anywhere and beleive me, you will run out your battery when you least expect it and you can work an SD card with other electronics. If you are fine with these issues then Saony is your choice. see less
By Alberto Navas on February 20, 2010
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One of the things that contributes to the speed between shots is the speed of the memory card in the camera. The faster the write speed the better. Of course, the camera has it's limits as well. Memory card speed is determined by what "Class" it is. Class 2's are basic slow types. Class 4 & 6's are faster. Prices have … see more One of the things that contributes to the speed between shots is the speed of the memory card in the camera. The faster the write speed the better. Of course, the camera has it's limits as well. Memory card speed is determined by what "Class" it is. Class 2's are basic slow types. Class 4 & 6's are faster. Prices have come down on these cards and can be found on sale and at good prices in lots of places, including here. I'd get at least a class 4 (which is what I did) for this camera. Since this model shoots once every 1.4 seconds or so, a class 6 card would not be worth the cost since it's not a rapid shooting unit. Another thing that will slow down between shots is using a flash. The camera shoots faster than the flash can recharge, so if a flash is needed, there will be an added delay if the flash is turned on. I like the way the flash is designed on this camera. Flipping the flash up or down assures you, and does it simply, that the flash is in the mode you want it to be in. No mistakes, it's simple. No special mode or button to look for. Flash up, it's on, flash down, it's off. It is so neat that way.
Using some good quality rechargeable AA's will improve the flash recharge time between shots as well. see less

By S. Griggs on July 16, 2010
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I haven't had mine that long, but my wife has a similar one and it has never gone bad.
By Haven Wildcat on September 2, 2014
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Yes, the "viewfinder" is on the back of the camera and is about 2 x 3 inches. It provides a very nice view of the picture you are about to take.
By Judy Mylly on August 11, 2014