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Showing 1-10 of 28 questions
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The 13" is a big loaf, so it's certainly going to be either the L or XL. If you use a breadmaker, then you want this pan! It's known as a Pullman pan or a Pain de Mie pan. The loaves are baked with the lid on, this gives a perfectly square sandwich slice and minimal crust, perfect for sandwiches. I don't even buy bread… see more The 13" is a big loaf, so it's certainly going to be either the L or XL. If you use a breadmaker, then you want this pan! It's known as a Pullman pan or a Pain de Mie pan. The loaves are baked with the lid on, this gives a perfectly square sandwich slice and minimal crust, perfect for sandwiches. I don't even buy bread anymore, It's so easy to make in my breadmaker and bake in my Pullman, that buying bread just doesn't make any sense. The King Arthur Flour website has tons of recipes specifically developed for this pan, and they work great with a breadmaker. If you're considering this pan, consider no longer. Just buy it. And don't get a similar one, get the USA Pan brand, you'll thank me the first time you wash it (all it needs to be wiped out with a paper towel). It's truly a great pan and it makes great bread. Search the King Arthur site for "Pain de Mie", you'll find recipes specifically for this pan and specifically for the smaller pan. Those recipes should give you an idea how to set your breadmaker. see less
By Jolenealaska on January 12, 2014
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Using a Pullman pan can be a little tricky. The recipe has to be sized for the pan or it could start flowing up and out either while rising or while you are baking. After much trial and more error, I use the lid during the rise and leave the lid off for baking. I end up with a nice "store bought" sized loaf as the brea… see more Using a Pullman pan can be a little tricky. The recipe has to be sized for the pan or it could start flowing up and out either while rising or while you are baking. After much trial and more error, I use the lid during the rise and leave the lid off for baking. I end up with a nice "store bought" sized loaf as the bread crowns over the top of the pan during baking. see less
By Stephen on December 16, 2014
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There were no instruction sheets, or recipes with this item.
By Lisa A. Tsiao on May 4, 2014
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I used to always bake bread and take it to hunting camp, and...it would always mold because we had no refrigeration. Then my Grandma told me to use HONEY in place of the sugar ( unpasturized) and NO more moldy bread. It lasts forever!!
By than on September 29, 2014
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I used to put a piece of parchment paper on top of and to the sides of regular bread dough in a Pullman pan, because I did not want to coat the sliding top with butter and flour (I didn't want butter leaking to the bottom of my oven) but completely lining a bread pan with parchment paper on the bottom and the sides loo… see more I used to put a piece of parchment paper on top of and to the sides of regular bread dough in a Pullman pan, because I did not want to coat the sliding top with butter and flour (I didn't want butter leaking to the bottom of my oven) but completely lining a bread pan with parchment paper on the bottom and the sides looks like an awful hassle to me. My bread books say indeed that the sourdough starter should not come into contact with metal - but I guess it's alright when you're in the dough phase, that you can bake in a metal pan. see less
By Marco Schuffelen on July 10, 2013
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After hand washing in warm soapy water and thoroughly rinsing, towel dry as best you can and then leave pan open to completely air dry. Additional information included:Use and Care* Hand wash your USA Pan pullman pan prior to first use and after every use in warm water with mild dishwashing soap, sponge or nylon pad. R… see more After hand washing in warm soapy water and thoroughly rinsing, towel dry as best you can and then leave pan open to completely air dry. Additional information included:Use and Care* Hand wash your USA Pan pullman pan prior to first use and after every use in warm water with mild dishwashing soap, sponge or nylon pad. Rinse and dry thoroughly. Do not use harsh abrasives or steel wool pads. Do not soak the pan in water to remove baked-on food or stains. Dishwasher detergents may damage the surface of the loaf pan.
* Use only wood, nylon, rubber or plastic tools.
* Do not cut food in the loaf pan. see less

By CHEFS* on November 16, 2015 SELLER
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No.
By Petra McGown on October 6, 2015
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I feel it should be fine watch your rise ,most people let their bread rise to long this pan makes a great loaf I don't make gluten free i have been baking all of our breads for40yrs if you decide on this pan watch your rise
By dot hennessee on June 7, 2015
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Nope! I only need to wipe it clean most of the time. Love it. Such great quality that I own three of them.
By Megan Bunker on June 6, 2015