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Showing 1-10 of 86 questions
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You will need batteries (AA I believe) wading and and rocket motors
By James L. Tanton on November 20, 2013
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You will need to purchase the rocket engines. They are sold in packages of three and come complete with wadding and igniters. Estes recommends B4-2 for the 1st flight of the Amazon (larger rocket) and B4-4, B6-2, C6-3 and C6-5 are also compatible. The Crossfire (smaller rocket) will accept A8-3 (first flight), B4-4,… see more You will need to purchase the rocket engines. They are sold in packages of three and come complete with wadding and igniters. Estes recommends B4-2 for the 1st flight of the Amazon (larger rocket) and B4-4, B6-2, C6-3 and C6-5 are also compatible. The Crossfire (smaller rocket) will accept A8-3 (first flight), B4-4, C6-5 and C6-7. You will also need to purchase both plastic model cement and wood glue (white school glue okay) for assembly. Lastly you will need to purchase a small can of spray primer, a small can of white spray paint and a can of clear spray paint (optional) to finish the smaller rocket as it is constructed from paper tube and balsa wood with a plastic nose cone. The larger rocket is mostly plastic, already finished and just requires stickers to be placed after assembly. The only tools required to assemble either rocket are an exacto knife, a small piece of fine sandpaper and scissors. The larger rocket is much easier to assemble and I would recommend tackling that one first. It also accepts many of the same engine sizes as the smaller one so you may get by with purchasing just a couple of sizes. Engines are selected by letter with A being the weakest and D being the most powerful. The first number after the letter type represents how many seconds the "burn" is and the last number represents the delay before deploying the parachute. Choose accordingly and start with the lower powered engines first to properly test your rocket and confirm your launch location is big enough. Trees, wind, houses and fenced in yards with dogs can be potential setbacks. My son and I had to contend with all of these our first launch despite utilizing a local park with six or seven acres of open area. Hope this helps. see less
By Barry R. on December 2, 2013
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Wadding and motors. Plus battery for controller.
By MJ on November 26, 2013
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First flight: Crossfire- A8-3; Amazon- B4-2. After that, up to C6 engines on both, though the Crossfire will go crazy high on a C. Amazon on a C6-3 is perfect.
By K. Lehmkuhl on December 4, 2013
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The rocket is completely reusable - the only one I have ever lost came down in a 60' Oak tree and was lost that way. The ENGINES and wadding have to be replaced between each flight. You can buy packages of three engines with sufficient igniters and wadding for three flights separately. They can be ordered on Amazon - w… see more The rocket is completely reusable - the only one I have ever lost came down in a 60' Oak tree and was lost that way. The ENGINES and wadding have to be replaced between each flight. You can buy packages of three engines with sufficient igniters and wadding for three flights separately. They can be ordered on Amazon - we usually get ours at Target or Wal-Mart simply for convenience. These are real solid fuel rocket engines - these rockets do not uses pumped pressurized water or air like some other systems for propulsion. see less
By George H. Avery on July 2, 2014
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My best guess is this set is for the novice. So the engine that is recommended for the first flight is the smallest and won't go vary far and also you would be able to tell if you were in a large enough area to launch and retrieve the rocket.
By Raymond Schleif on July 22, 2014
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Our grandson was 12 when he 'launched' his rocket. He had four adult 'assistants' and got permission from the local junior high to use their practice football field for the launch. Everything went extremely well - the rockets did what it was expected to do and our grandson was very pleased with the results. Good ex… see more Our grandson was 12 when he 'launched' his rocket. He had four adult 'assistants' and got permission from the local junior high to use their practice football field for the launch. Everything went extremely well - the rockets did what it was expected to do and our grandson was very pleased with the results. Good experience all the way around! see less
By William Kinnison on June 1, 2014
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Not pre assembled. It doesn't take too much work. The wadding is a type of barrier that protects your parachute from burning. The bottom of rocket ignites to go up. Then the top ignites to blow the cone off the body tube and defend back to earth.
By K9 on May 14, 2014
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It could be a bad launcher, bad igniter, poor igniter contact, or a bad engine. Frequently the igniters can break if not handled properly. Check to make sure the ignition residue hasn't come off or cracked. Replace the igniter if it has. Make sure it has contact with the engine. Next, try a different engine. Last… see more It could be a bad launcher, bad igniter, poor igniter contact, or a bad engine. Frequently the igniters can break if not handled properly. Check to make sure the ignition residue hasn't come off or cracked. Replace the igniter if it has. Make sure it has contact with the engine. Next, try a different engine. Lastly, try new batteries in the igniter. The igniter key has to be inserted and pushed firmly (and held) and the light will come on. At this point, you can hit the launch button. see less
By Charles on September 6, 2013
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You still need the engines (they go inside the rockets), and batteries for the launch controller. Other than that, I believe it comes with everything else you need. When shopping for engines, pay attention to the model of them to ensure they are right for your rockets. There are a lot of different options out there. A'… see more You still need the engines (they go inside the rockets), and batteries for the launch controller. Other than that, I believe it comes with everything else you need. When shopping for engines, pay attention to the model of them to ensure they are right for your rockets. There are a lot of different options out there. A's are the smaller weaker ones for small body rockets and beginners, then they have B's and C's as well. You will need a bigger one (at least a B) for the larger Amazon rocket. see less
By James Duvall on March 31, 2016