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As a previous owner of the Canon Rebel, and since you are a first time user, I feel strongly that you will do better with the Nikon D3100. I say this with experience and here's why; the Canon Rebel is a great camera with many features. It's speed, focus and user friendly operations allows for great performance, however… see more As a previous owner of the Canon Rebel, and since you are a first time user, I feel strongly that you will do better with the Nikon D3100. I say this with experience and here's why; the Canon Rebel is a great camera with many features. It's speed, focus and user friendly operations allows for great performance, however, with a price to come with it. I'm not going to tell you the price, only that it is a bit higher than the Nikon. With the Nikon, you get most of the same great features, "easy-to-use" with a guide for "easy shoot", CD/paper instruction manual, plus if you get the D3100 18-55 VR Kit, it comes with a f/3.5-5.6 VR Lens. Both the lens and camera are covered by extensive warranties which come included. (simply register online). I like the 5 year warranty on the lens alone. But price is the most important function, and if you're concerned with reliability, Nikon is just as a trusted name as Canon, so it will last you a while! I hope this shed some light on your decision. One more note, as with a previous answer to your question, about a "booklet" that comes with the camera, the CD version of the "booklet" will allow better visibility and clearer understanding of the example frames shown in the "booklet". The CD opens up the "booklet" to the size of your monitor on your laptop or computer which makes it easier to read. Thanks. see less
By Ray on May 5, 2013
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The D3100 is lighter and smaller-but not by much either way. The swivel screen is a big deal; it definitely increases the functionality of the camera, e.g., self-portraits, low and overhead shots, and video. Image quality is a wash. Yes, the D5100 has better dynamic range, but that will only matter if you shoot RAW … see more The D3100 is lighter and smaller-but not by much either way. The swivel screen is a big deal; it definitely increases the functionality of the camera, e.g., self-portraits, low and overhead shots, and video. Image quality is a wash. Yes, the D5100 has better dynamic range, but that will only matter if you shoot RAW and post-process. The D3100 is significantly more user friendly for noobies. Its controls are better arranged and better thought out, so it won't be hard to quickly get started. The D5100 has a few more capabilities that advanced beginners and enthusiasts on a budget will appreciate. Bracketing for HDR shooting is the feature that stands out. There are also a few more options in video including the option for an external mic on the D5100.
As an enthusiast looking for a small, compact, economical camera to complement my enthusiast-level Canon cameras, I opted for the D5100 instead of one of the Canon Rebel series (I've owned three and finally concluded that the Rebel AF was inadequate for my needs). However, making a recommendation to someone who had never used a DSLR or SLR, and just wants to get better pictures of family and friends, I would unequivocally recommend the D3100. However, for someone who thought that photography might become a serious hobby, the D5100 is the obvious step-up choice to get instead of the D3100.
Another consideration is how it feels in your hands. Both cameras are very small for DSLRs. Users with big hands are well-advised to try these cameras before buying. I've heard lots of complaints that these cameras are simply too small to comfortably use. see less

By Gatorowl on October 23, 2011
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Is it possible? Yes, but it depends on a few factors, such as whether the flash is on or off, if you are using manual or auto focus, if you need to re-focus between shots, etc.
The Nikon D3100 has a continuous shooting mode; in that mode, if you do not have to wait for the flash to reload and you want to keep the sam… see more
Is it possible? Yes, but it depends on a few factors, such as whether the flash is on or off, if you are using manual or auto focus, if you need to re-focus between shots, etc.
The Nikon D3100 has a continuous shooting mode; in that mode, if you do not have to wait for the flash to reload and you want to keep the same focus, then yes, it will take pictures for as long as you wish to hold the shutter, with almost no lag between photos.
However, if you are using the built-in flash, you may have to wait a couple of seconds for the flash to reload between shots (most cameras do this), or if you need to refocus between shots it may also take time to do that. But it is much faster than most point-and-shoot cameras.
I leave my D3100 in continuous mode most of the time; when shooting fast moving subjects, I have a better chance of getting the best shot when it takes several right in a row.
One final note: I've found this camera has the best shot-to-shot times when using an SD card with fast write times. Most of the cheap class 2 and class 4 cards are not able to write the pictures to the card fast enough to keep up with the continuous shooting mode and result in a "processing" screen that takes a few seconds to clear. When I put a class 10 card in the camera, that issue disappeared and I now happily take large numbers of photos in short amounts of time. see less

By JC on August 8, 2012
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Ok, short answer: If you get the kit lense, it's a 3x optical zoom, roughly (not sure where you think you saw a digital zoom rating... there shouldn't be one). Long answer follows (and you should probably read the long answer, because it's good information to have if you're looking at getting into SLRs)
The zoom for… see more
Ok, short answer: If you get the kit lense, it's a 3x optical zoom, roughly (not sure where you think you saw a digital zoom rating... there shouldn't be one). Long answer follows (and you should probably read the long answer, because it's good information to have if you're looking at getting into SLRs)
The zoom for an SLR is always in the lens you choose to pair with the camera's body, and that is always an optical zoom (digital zoom refers to what is, essentially, cropping the picture and blowing it up, which has an accompanying loss in resolution; you won't see digital zoom as a feature on an SLR as that essentially would amount to only exposing light to part of the sensor, which is ultimately pointless)
If you look at lenses, you'll see a bunch of numbers. It might look something like 55-300mm f/3.5-5.6. That first set of numbers is the focal length, and since it's a range, you're looking at a zoom lense rather than a fixed lense (a fixed lense might just say something like 35mm or 50mm). The effective magnification of that range is roughly 6x... but 55mm is already a bit magnified, particularly on a D3100, which has a smaller DX type sensor that effectively magnifies all shots by around 1.5x.
So if you got this camera with the kit lense, which is 18-55mm and a telephoto lense that is 55-300mm, between the two lenses, you'd have an optical zoom of a little less than 17x... though you would have to carry both lenses and swap between the two as needed in order to get that full range.
So essentially, the point is that the zoom of this camera is up to you. If you want to, you can even buy one of those fixed focal length mirror lenses rated at 1000mm or so and get some truly incredible magnification. But if you do, get yourself a tripod too. see less

By Matthew C. Decamp on August 8, 2011
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Yea... too bad, I was just about to buy.
By Lan Reader on November 21, 2011
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hi Dan,
good choice! the d3100 is a great camera. i still sometimes grab it over my d7000 depending on what i'm shooting. photography is a daunting thing when you're first starting out. i spent about 2 months on the internet researching the exposure controls before i even had my camera and i still was lost when i first… see more
hi Dan,
good choice! the d3100 is a great camera. i still sometimes grab it over my d7000 depending on what i'm shooting. photography is a daunting thing when you're first starting out. i spent about 2 months on the internet researching the exposure controls before i even had my camera and i still was lost when i first started shooting. two really helpful subjects i recommend google searching and studying are "the exposure triangle" and "photography composition". ok on to your question. first, those lenses have better optics, so they'll give you slightly better image quality. it's not immediately noticable, especially if you're not blowing the images up to 100% magnification on your computer screen, but the images from those lenses will be better. the kit lens is a good lens though, so dont think it's image quality is bad. but the real benefit of those prime lenses i've suggested (35, 50, 85mm) is thier low light ability and depth of field control. when you look at the 35mm lens description you see 1.8. the kit lens is 3.5-5.6. what those numbers represent is the maximum aperture of the lens. the smaller the number, the biggger the iris in the lens can open to, allowing more light in. the 35mm lens can open to f1.8. the kit lens on the other hand is variable, at 18mm it's open to f3.5, but closes down to f5.6 as you zoom to 55mm. so the 35mm lens with it's 1.8 aperture will perform better in low light conditions compared to the kit lens. what that allows is faster shutter speeds and less motion blur in low lighting conditions. or you can lower your iso to reduce image noise. there are many benefits to a large aperture lens. depth of field control is another huge benefit of the large aperture lenses. google image search "bokeh". see how in most of those images the foreground and/or background is very blurry and soft looking, but the subject is in focus? that's a shallow depth of field. bokeh is a subjective term referring to the quality of the blurred portion of the image. so your aperture is one of the main controls over your depth of field, and the larger your aperture, the shallower your depth of field can be. so to really blur out the background in an image, you'll want a large aperture lens, say f1.8, or f1.4. another large factor in depth of field and bokeh is the focal length of the lens. in general, all else equal, a longer focal length (in mm) should produce better bokeh. so the 85mm 1.8g should (and does!) have a shallower depth of field and more appealing bokeh, than the 50mm 1.8g and 35mm 1.8g. the 50mm 1.8g should (and does!) have a shallower depth of field and more appealing bokeh than the 35mm 1.8g. so if you like to do portraits and want to really blur the background to seperate the subject from it, the 85mm 1.8g (or 1.4g) is the lens to get. sorry for being long winded, i have trouble explaining all this. but going back to the 35mm and the kit lens, the kit lens cant really do nice bokeh shots becuase it's not a large aperture lens. it's also going to perform worst in low light situations. one word of warning though, dont get any of those prime lenses i suggested (35/50/85) unless you learn A or M mode, as you'll need to set the aperture youself to control the depth of field and blurring. if you just use auto then you dont know what aperture the camera will pick, and you may not get the results you intended. anyhow i wrote alot, come back with any questions. see less

By Amazon Customer on June 7, 2012
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i have the d3100 and i love it. since you're a beginner on a budget save the $ and get the cheaper d3100, and stay with the kit lens it comes with. the d3100 can take wonderful photos, and handles very well. the kit lens is a good lens, great for beginners. once you're more advanced with your skills, and you've learned… see more i have the d3100 and i love it. since you're a beginner on a budget save the $ and get the cheaper d3100, and stay with the kit lens it comes with. the d3100 can take wonderful photos, and handles very well. the kit lens is a good lens, great for beginners. once you're more advanced with your skills, and you've learned some of the manual modes on the camera, then i'd recommend either the nikon 50mm 1.8g or 35mm 1.8g. one thing you might want to consider adding when you get the camera, is a telephoto lens for reach/zoom. the nikon 55-200mm af-s or 55-300mm af-s are great lenses and will give you more reach, so you can be farther away and get in close to your subjects. just something to think about. oh, another reason i like the d3100 over the d5100 for beginners, it's got a guide mode to teach you how to use the camera. very useful! good luck, let us know what you end up getting. see less
By Amazon Customer on June 22, 2012
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Yes, it does
By Juan G. Ruiz Correa on May 27, 2014
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I have 2 non-Nikon replacement batteries for my d3100, they work great.
By chickinspector on January 2, 2013
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It's come down about $50 in the last couple of months. However, I would not expect it to come down more. It might it, might not. But cameras usually do not fluctuate in price very much. $497 including card and bag is a good deal.
By Chet Ragsdale on October 23, 2012