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Category 5 is the most basic. Cat 5 cable is available in two varieties: Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP), the type widely used in the United States, and Screened Twisted Pair (SCTP), which has shielding to provide a measure of extra protection against interference, but is rarely used outside of Europe. Cables belonging t… see more Category 5 is the most basic. Cat 5 cable is available in two varieties: Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP), the type widely used in the United States, and Screened Twisted Pair (SCTP), which has shielding to provide a measure of extra protection against interference, but is rarely used outside of Europe. Cables belonging to Category 5 are either solid or stranded: Solid Cat 5 is more rigid, and the better choice if data needs to be transmitted over a long distance, while Stranded Cat 5 is very flexible and most likely to be used as patch cable. Cat 5 cable can support 10 or 100 Mbps Ethernet, and has a capability of up to 100MHz.
Cat 5e (which stands for Category 5, enhanced) cable goes along the same lines as basic Cat 5, except that it fulfills higher standards of data transmission. While Cat 5 is common in existing cabling systems, Category 5e has almost entirely replaced it in new installations. Cat 5e can handle data transfer at 1000 Mbps, is suitable for Gigabit Ethernet, and experiences much lower levels of near-end crosstalk (NEXT) than Cat 5.
Category 6 is the most advanced and provides the best performance. Just like Cat 5 and Cat 5e, Category 6 cable is typically made up of four twisted pairs of copper wire, but its capabilities far exceed those of other cable types because of one particular structural difference: a longitudinal separator. This separator isolates each of the four pairs of twisted wire from the others, which reduces crosstalk, allows for faster data transfer, and gives Category 6 cable twice the bandwidth of Cat 5! Cat 6 cable is ideal for supporting 10 Gigabit Ethernet, and is able to operate at up to 250 MHz. Since technology and standards are constantly evolving, Cat 6 is the wisest choice of cable when taking any possible future updates to your network into consideration. Not only is Category 6 cable future-safe, it is also backward-compatible with any previously-existing Cat 5 and Cat 5e cabling found in older installations.
FROM: http://www.cableorganizer.com/articles/cat5-cat5e-cat6.htm see less

By Mark Strelecki on August 28, 2013
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Kerrith... I thought the same thing so i asked my home office web guys and was told on the Cat6 you can go as far as 300 ft before you have performance problems that is not the same with a Cat5 stay with the cat6 and just get the 50 footer you will not notice a thing it will work perfect i needed 50 feet and bought the… see more Kerrith... I thought the same thing so i asked my home office web guys and was told on the Cat6 you can go as far as 300 ft before you have performance problems that is not the same with a Cat5 stay with the cat6 and just get the 50 footer you will not notice a thing it will work perfect i needed 50 feet and bought the 75 footer I am using the cable on a Shore-tel phone and works clear as a bell. see less
By STEVE ELVING on June 3, 2015
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Better transmission performance but you will probably not notice any difference with your home network. Maybe with future devices and high bandwidths down the road it may matter. If all else is equal including price, I would just go with Cat 6 now.
By DJ on April 11, 2015
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Yes they are. But they are still flexible.
By southernman on February 23, 2014
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I don't think so, I believe outdoor wire is thicker than this is.
By Dan Maxwell on September 1, 2013
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The top to bottom measure is greatest...just measured and I think a 5/8" will do it, snug but should be enough.
By Jim from Wilmington on April 25, 2015
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as long as the cable isn't touching the radiator pipe where the hot metal could melt the cable covering it should be insulated enough to protect the wire inside. But I would keep it a few inches away from the radiator if at all possible.
By Kindle Customer on September 27, 2014
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Yes, cat.6 is just a newer version that feeds the info faster. It's is completely backwards compatible.
By Alexander nava on August 31, 2015
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On the web I found this information. Hope it is helpful. "Copper Installation temperature range: 32°F to 140°F (0°C to 60°C), Operating temperature range: -4°F to 167°F (-20°C to 75°C)" To read more check out this pdf: http://www.panduit.com/ccurl/284/133/Communications%20Copper%20Horizontal%20Cabling%20%28271513%29.pdf
By mrfixit01 on April 16, 2015
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I did not see any such rating, but I wouldn't put a cable of this low quality in my walls. Search Amazon for in wall Ethernet cable
By Cat6 on October 15, 2015