I can't decide for my 60d canon 85 mm 1.8 vs 60 mm macro , family,children,newborn is what I mainly photograph, like to start some macro for fun ~ I did just order, but haven't had a chance to play with it yet a sigma 30mm 1.4 for inside work. So I'm looking for something to compliment that for outside family work
[UPDATED] asked by Erica Carew on February 15, 2013
Sort: Most Helpful first | Newest first | Oldest first
Showing 1-8 of 8 answers
A
this would be a great camrea just for that. it will take great shoots, but team that up with a good speed flash and you got a killer camera.
Amazon Customer answered on February 15, 2013
Comment (1) | 2 of 2 found this helpful. Do you?  Yes No | Report abuse

A
My comment would be that for the 85mm, the minimum focus distance is pretty far away and pretty zoomed in for indoors. I would think the 60mm will give more flexibility especially for shots of the baby close up and baby plus mom
Edmund answered on February 15, 2013
Comment (1) | Do you find this helpful?  Yes No | Report abuse

A
85mm f/1.8 EF USM is a good choice for portraiture and standard photography, especially if you're shoot'n low light conditions using natural light with the wider aperture. 60mm macro would be fun..May I suggest the Canon EFS 17-85mm f/3-5.5 USM Ultra wide...it has a wide focal range, still wide aperture and GREAT for all photography ($750)...my Canon is always wearing it until I put on a larger 90-300mm lens :)
Shaun Ashmead answered on February 15, 2013
Comments (4) | Do you find this helpful?  Yes No | Report abuse

A
85mm for a newborn? For children running and playing; yes, but for babies the 60mm mac is perfect imho.
Richie Rich answered on February 15, 2013
Comment (1) | Do you find this helpful?  Yes No | Report abuse

A
The 85mm is perfect for portraits on a Full frame an almos equivilant on the 60d will be the 50mm 1.4. In my opinion a 50mm and the macro will be a better choice.
JM Mora answered on February 15, 2013
Comment (1) | Do you find this helpful?  Yes No | Report abuse

A
60 mm.................or the Sigma 15-50mm 2.4
Frank D. Nave answered on February 15, 2013
Comment | Do you find this helpful?  Yes No | Report abuse

A
You won't go wrong with either lens, but since the 60mm will also give you a macro lens, you probably should make that your choice. C'mon, that's the one you really want anyhow, isn't it.
Irish mike answered on February 15, 2013
Comment | Do you find this helpful?  Yes No | Report abuse

A
There's alot of assumptions I can make in this question. Did you buy the camera new? Did it come with a lens? If so, which one? Or did you just obtain a body? Is Money no object, or do you want the most for the least? And, are you on a budget? Do you think you will upgrade at a later date?
There are 3 standard EF-S lenses that come with this camera. The 16mm 2.8 *** the 18-135mm *** 3.5-5.6 *** and the 18-200mm 3.5-5.6. DID YOUR CAMERA COME WITH ONE OF THESE?
The big problem is always MONEY. The EF-S lens is a cropped lens designed for the 60d. (which has a cropped sensor) Better lenses for better camera's would be the EF lens and the L lens, (EF-L) being the better of the 3. The lower the "F" value, by number means the more light available to the lens, and the better the lens. A 1.8 lens is usually expensive, but very desireable. Generally, the lower the number in mm measure, the wider the view. A full frame sensor camera has a wider field of view naturally than the cropped lenses. In the more expensive lenses, a 24mm can have a wider view angle than say the 16mm in the 60D's EF-S lens, as it serves a full frame sensor. Put it on a cropped camera like the 60d, you won't get as much view. (angle width)
Now you never mentioned zooming at all. Most people do zoom from time to time.
I'd say the EF-S 16mm X 2.8 would do a fine job for you. The 18-135mm is not quite as wide of an angle for view, but you have zoom with it, and the 18-200mm gives you what the 18-135 has at the bottom end with more zoom.
I assume you are referring to the "L" lens when you list the 85mm X 1.8. My question is, if you can afford this L lens, why didn't you buy a full frame sensor camera instead of the 60d?
Anyway, if the lens you mention is the L lens, it would work OK on the 60d, but alot better on the 5d. It is a very nice lens, and an investment. It won't do as much as if you had a full frame sensor camera.
I wouldn't buy the macro, as it's primarily for close ups, which you will not be using, from what you state. But if you want to play with it, you really need both. The 85 will do more than the macro for what you want, but you might end up with both!
Ernest F. Carneau answered on February 16, 2013
Comments (2) | Do you find this helpful?  Yes No | Report abuse
‹ Previous   1   Next ›

See all questions about this product