Buy New
$14.34
Qty:1
  • List Price: $17.00
  • Save: $2.66 (16%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 19 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Trade in your item
Get a $3.45
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Los detectives salvajes (Vintage Espanol) (Spanish Edition) (Spanish) Paperback – February 9, 2010


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, February 9, 2010
$14.34
$9.99 $10.00

Frequently Bought Together

Los detectives salvajes (Vintage Espanol) (Spanish Edition) + 2666 (Spanish Edition) + Estrella distante (Vintage Espanol) (Spanish Edition)
Price for all three: $42.29

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

eBooks Kindle en Español
Descubre más de 75,000 libros en Español, incluyendo best sellers, libros exclusivos y Kindle Singles. Compra ya

Product Details

  • Series: Vintage Espanol
  • Paperback: 609 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage Espanol (February 9, 2010)
  • Language: Spanish
  • ISBN-10: 0307476111
  • ISBN-13: 978-0307476111
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 5.1 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #80,841 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Born in 1953 and a resident of Spain since 1977, Chilean author Bolano didn't publish his first work of fiction until he was 43, but he's certainly made up for lost time. In the last five years he's published seven books, the last of which, Llamadas telefonicas (Telephone Calls, Anagrama, 1997), solidified his reputation as one of Latin America's premier postmodernist writers. In this his latest novel, Bolano presents the life of Sebasti n Urrutia Lacroix, a Chilean priest and minor poet who, under the pseudonym H. Ibacache, doubles as one the country's most important literary critics. "Now I'm dying," Sebasti n declares in the book's first line, "but I still have a lot to say... There are some things that must be cleared up." Thus begins a hallucinatory rant in which Sebasti n recounts his adventures as part of Santiago's literary scene and attempts to justify his flirtations with the darker side of Chilean politics. (After all, this is the era of Pinochet, when, in Bolano's view, even society women can hide horrors in their basements.) A classic use of the unreliable narrator and a powerful allegory about the deceptions of political life, Bolano's novel is another success. Strongly recommended for both libraries and bookstores. Marcela Vald?s, "Criticas"
Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Review

“Uno de los más grandes e influyentes escritores modernos”. —The New York Times Book Review

“Desde Gabriel García Márquez… ningún latinoamericano había rediseñado el mapa de la literatura mundial tan enfáticamente como Roberto Bolaño”—The Washington Post Book World

“Una obra maestra”. —The New Yorker  

More About the Author

Author of 2666 and many other acclaimed works, Roberto Bolaño (1953-2003) was born in Santiago, Chile, and later lived in Mexico, Paris, and Spain. He has been acclaimed "by far the most exciting writer to come from south of the Rio Grande in a long time" (Ilan Stavans, The Los Angeles Times)," and as "the real thing and the rarest" (Susan Sontag). Among his many prizes are the extremely prestigious Herralde de Novela Award and the Premio Rómulo Gallegos. He was widely considered to be the greatest Latin American writer of his generation. He wrote nine novels, two story collections, and five books of poetry, before dying in July 2003 at the age of 50. Chris Andrews has won the TLS Valle Inclán Prize and the PEN Translation Prize for his Bolaño translations.

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

35 of 40 people found the following review helpful By Javier A. Moreno on November 9, 2004
Format: Paperback
I was there, I saw them walking on the street leaving the world behind. I was there when they left Mexico and when they came back. I was one of the few who remembers the chilean who saved the girl. I was there when Belano arrived to Africa. I've never understood their motives. I was a distant witness of a story thousands and thousands larger than mine. I was there, like a ghost.

Los Detectives Salvajes is the kind of book that you read to realize that you haven't read enough. This astounding novel takes you in a strange journey following the steps of two latinoamerican poets while they escape from an unknown past. It's a novel about the books that will never be written and the writers who were condemned to be their authors.

I strongly recommend you this book. This is Bolaño's best, and Bolaño is, undoubtly, one of the best spanish-speaking writters of late 20th century.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
23 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Castulo Aceves Orozco on August 12, 2004
Format: Paperback
Enrique VilaMatas said about this book, "And historic Move on to Cortazar's Rayuela". Since then, and a year after Bolaño's death, I've hear all kind of opinions. The real fact is, that in despite of comparing the quality, the structure or the author, this book is a step over the latinamerican literature.

In a time when all the american boom's writters had started to repeat each others, "Los detectives Salvajes" is proposing a new kind of literature. A literature that is easy to read (fluid) but hard to understand. As Carver, everything is a metaphore of something big, in an aparently common anecdote.

Maybe you could like this book, maybe not. But it is a MUST if you want to keep in touch with the new literature.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Antonio Gonzalez on July 7, 2007
Format: Paperback
NOCTURNO DE CHILE is a short book, 150 pages. Its text is presented without subdivisions: no chapters, no parts I, II etc. The book is the final confession of a dying priest Father Sebastian Urrutia , in essence, the story of his life. The events are presented in chronological order. The author often strays into metaphoric soliloquies and sometimes springs us with shower of strange, names. Beware, this eclectic bibliographies do very little to obscure a straight forward plot:

While, still an adolescent seminarian, Sebastian receives and unexpected invitation by a famous critic, Farewell, to a week-end stay at a his country estate. More than ever, Sebastian considered himself now favored by the muses and his Christian God. All goes well: during the visit he is introduced by Farewell, to the Chilean Nobel Laureate poet Pablo Neruda. And he meets many other Chilean poets. After the official recitations and laudations of the night,the host invites Sebastian to secretely watch Neruda, reciting by moonligh in the garden, the entranced young man is abruptly brought back to reality, as he finds himself the object and subject of Farewell's sexual advances.

No, this novel is not another case presentation of character disorders or about Gothic class injustice. Farewell's weaknesses are not much of the story. But maybe Bolano is introducing a portent, a foreboding for Sebastian's gathering storm. The communist revolution is due in Chile and so is the blood bath of Pinochet following in step.

After having read four books by Bolano, I consider myself an initiated fan. I thus do not hesitate to recommend him as new genius. If you are concerned about buying a relatively expensive paper- back, by an unknown author, I suggest you may start with this book. NOCTURNO DE CHILE is easy to read, poetic and interesting, and equal to the best of Latin American prose styles.

Happy reading
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Campos on July 13, 2009
Format: Paperback
Muchos dicen que es lo mejor de Roberto Bolaño. Un libro difícil de categorizar. Algunas partes son un poco pesadas pero cuando llegas al final te das cuenta que en su conjunto es un libro muy bueno.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought this book for my Spanish teacher as a going away present and it was just what he wanted. Along with being an excellent friend and teacher this book was perfect for him since he loves Spanish literature and anything related to Don Quixote in general. Los Detectives Salvajes is a lot like my teacher since its characters represent some individual from Spanish literature and the main characters are modern day Quixotians. If you know anybody interested in Spanish literature or Don Quixote, this is the book for them.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
English translation is beautiful but the real gem of Bolano is written in his native tongue. One of my favorite authors because his stream of consciousness is spot-on.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Oliveira on July 7, 2013
Format: Paperback
Lo admito: Los detectives salvajes no es una obra para cualquiera. Muchas de las personas a quienes he recomendado el libro me objetaron que era muy largo, que tenía páginas de más, que no es un clásico porque un clásico te dice mejores cosas con menos palabras. Respeto su opinión.

Pero lo que yo he visto es algo completamente diferente. Lo que yo veo en la obra de Bolaño es una necesidad de escapar de las grandes novelas del Boom para escribir una grande y larga novela (en extensión y en ambición) que se lea con la rapidez de un bestseller. Lo que yo veo es un dialogo no sólo con Rayuela de Cortázar sino con una tradición en lengua española que se remonta a las crónicas de india. (Pensar en los viajes de Belano por África como una reescritura de estos viajes iniciáticos.) Lo que yo veo es la ambición de un escritor por querer abarcar la historia inabarcable del continente americano a través de los viajes de dos poetas malditos (o de dos malditos poetas).

Supongo que es válida la opinión de rechazo por parte de mis amigos lectores. Pero sigo recomendando esta novela porque creo que en unos años/décadas/siglos (en 2666 si el mundo por un milagro sigue en pie) se va a recordar el final del siglo veinte/principio de siglo veintiuno (si existe la justicia literaria) a través de una serie de obras y nombres: Sebald, Coetzee, Borges, Roberto Bolaño.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?