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Aileen Wuornos: Selling of a Serial Killer 1994 R

A twisted tale of murder, alleged police corruption and conniving opportunists that tracks the sensational trial and conviction of "America's First Female Serial Killer."

Starring:
Jesse 'The Human Bomb' Aviles, Nick Broomfield
Runtime:
1 hour, 27 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

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Product Details

Genres Documentary
Director Nick Broomfield
Starring Jesse 'The Human Bomb' Aviles, Nick Broomfield
Supporting actors Cannonball, Steve Glazer, Brian Jarvis, Stéphane Markcovich, Michael McCarthy, Dick Mills, Tyria Moore, Arlene Pralle, Mike Reynolds, Aileen Wuornos
Studio First Look
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Peter Shelley on August 7, 2001
Format: VHS Tape
This excellent 1992 British documentary by Nick Broomfield about "America's first female serial killer" poses more questions than it answers which is indicative of the quagmire of duplicity that surrounded the case. Aileen was a prostitute convicted of the shooting murder of 7 men in central Florida between 1989 and 1990 and sentenced to death by electric chair. She is a tragic figure since she appeared to be surrounded by people who wanted to see her die and profit from their association with her. Her lesbian lover helped her be arrested, her adopted stepmother convinced her to plead guilty, her lawyer more excited about his rock career, the police more interested in the movie rights, state politicians who needed her dead to be re-elected. When we finally get to meet Aileen in prison we see what an intelligent and open person she appears to be, which deepens the tragedy, though we never learn her fate. Broomfield spends a lot of time on camera with Aileen's stepmother and lawyer, filming their negotiated contracts, and travelling the area trying to unravel the story, though ultimately failing. Aileen claims that the killings were all acts of self-defense, an opinion we tend to believe when we hear her horrific evidence in a filmed trial. The most fascinating person is the one we never meet - the vanished ex-lover whom Aileen is willing to die to protect and who seems to hold the key to the truth.
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Format: DVD
Well documents the sad and absurd people and circumstances in Aileen Wuornos' new life as a serial killer in 1992. Best if seen with the 2002 interviews "Aileen - Life and Death of a Serial Killer" in order to appreciate how bizarre it all gets over time. Actually, it is essential to see them together.
Very objective in trying to find the truth in Aileen's unfolding and complex insanity.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
The story of Aileen Wournous is at frist glance morbid and somehow incomplete. Where some light finally shines is in this brilliant and unflinching documentary. More than the story of what makes a serial killer - this is the story of one womans free fall through the cracks of society. Where everyone drops the ball in one giant foul play of greed and incompetance.

From the police that arrested her and were eventually fired in a sting operation for peddling her movie rights. To the woman who adopted her to sell interviews at 10 grand a pop to her incompetent lawyer who both abused her civil rights and sold her out. And all the way back to her tormented childhood - this film is terrifying but not so much for her crimes as it is for the collective rape of her rights before she was found guilty by due process.

The film doesn't excuse her crimes nor does it try and justify them. It's unflinching and blinding light comes from Wauornes herself as she exposes each dark corner and each secret of both her life as a killer and the Laws and institutions that failed her.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Very interesting account of how lowest of the low swarmed in to try to make money off Alieen. The born-again christian? who adopted Alieen and then tried to sell her story. Also, the attorney was a complete and total joke. The disorgainzation of Alieens personality became apparent as the film progressed. I felt the movie was well done and a must for anyone interested in this case.
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By A Customer on April 25, 1999
Format: VHS Tape
Potential viewers turned off by the subject matter should be apprised that the murders committed by Aileen Wuornos are not shown, not dwelled upon, and not the main interest of this film; Broomfield is more interested in focusing upon the gallery of eccentrics, lunatics, and con men who have descended upon the imprisoned Wuornos to profit from her notoriety. Serious questions are raised by the conduct of her lawyer, a fringe-type who, here, is more interested in playing his folk songs on the guitar (presumably dreaming that this documentary will earn him a wider audience) than he is in fighting for his client; the thunderbolt that he was not licensed to actually defend a client in court is enough to make you realize that Wuornos, whatever her crimes, was entitled to more. By the time Wuornos appears for a brief interview at film's end, she emerges as the most sympathetic character in the film! Broomfield, who also made quality documentaries about Heidi Fleiss and Courtney Love, is no shallow celebrity-chaser; he has a genuine talent for getting people to reveal their true souls on film, often to their extreme detriment -- but to the benefit of the truth that may have been overlooked by more conventional news coverage. Nobody could have made up this stuff -- and it is frequently very, very funny.
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Format: Amazon Video Verified Purchase
After seeing Monster, the 2003 crime drama film about serial killer Aileen Wuornos, I was intrigued enough to watch a couple of documentaries about the person who has become known as the world's first female serial killer. This film by documentary filmmaker Nick Broomfield included video footage of Aileen Wuornos, plus original footage taken by Broomfield of Wuornos and people who knew her. The film includes a lot of footage of interviews with Arlene Pralle, the woman who adopted Wuornos after she was arrested; Steve Glazer, a musician turned lawyer who defended Wuornos in court; and a cop who exposed other cops who were negotiating movie deals for the story. Wuornos herself claimed that her trials were to gather grist for the film that would be made about her, and that the conspirators did not want her to plead guilty. It's a fascinating behind-the-scenes look at Aileen Wuornos and those who knew her.

And seeing the film gave me an even greater admiration for actress Charlize Theron's physical transformation into Aileen Wuornos for the 2003 film Monster. If the two were standing side by side and speaking, I'm not sure if I could tell which one was the real Wuornos. Seriously, Ms. Theron's Oscar for Best Actress was well deserved.
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