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The Lucky Ones 2008 R CC

A timely drama about life in America today, THE LUCKY ONES is a story of three soldiers on leave trying to make sense of their lives during an unexpected road trip across the United States.

Starring:
Rachel McAdams, Tim Robbins
Runtime:
1 hour, 53 minutes

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Product Details

Genres Military & War, Drama, Comedy
Director Neil Burger
Starring Rachel McAdams, Tim Robbins
Supporting actors Michael Peña, Molly Hagan, Mark L. Young, Howard Platt, Arden Myrin, Coburn Goss, John Heard, Jennifer Joan Taylor, Katherine LaNasa, Leo Ford, Susan Yeagley, Emily Swallow, John Diehl, Annie Corley, Katie Korby, Kirk B.R. Woller, James Errico, Meredith Siemsen
Studio Lionsgate
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
Amazon.com recapped the plot ably if less than enthusiastically, so I'll just jump to the praise. A truly fantastic movie! Intelligent, hilarious, touching, surprising, thoughtful, wonderfully performed, even suspensful. Superlatives do not do this movie justice because each one demands it's own exclamation when instead they are all woven together into the seemless and harmonic beauty that is this film's quiet grandeur. And don't forget it's very funny. So do yourself a great favor and see a movie with characters you will not want to leave, or leave each other. Thanks, and have a nice evening.
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Format: DVD
"The Lucky Ones" shows that a great movie can be made on a shoestring, without car explosions or special effects or any whizbangery.

All it takes is terrific acting, moving characters, great writing, and appropriate (often spectacular, sometimes grimy) scenery.

This one is the story of three soldiers, on leave from Iraq for wounds, who meet and share a ride--then share much more. They become emotionally close, even spiritually intimate, all the moreso because the civilian worlds they are returning to crumble around them like fading dreams.

Colee (Rachel McAdams) is the youngest, most innocent: wide-eyed, eager, happy, frank, unashamed, friendly, loving, open to anything. She is the forever-child--who learns, but never loses her innocent wonder, no matter how many shocks she endures.

She provides the catalyst for Cheever (Tim Robbins), the old timer who is looking forward to being DONE with the army and war, but whose world collapses and who, the others fear, has reached suicide; and for T.K. (Michael Pena), the young hotshot who has life all figured out, ready for his climb to the top--until nothing works.

It's Colee who points out the wonderful beauty of life they are passing through--which the other two almost miss, and who indicates how they can start over.

The ending is terribly sad and uplifting and scary and hopeless all at once.

There are many "war" movies, and they are pretty much all the same.

This is a "peace" movie, which shows how difficult and how rewarding peace can be--but also how fragile.
Comment 13 of 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: DVD
The movie combines the well established road movie genre with the more recent 'returners from Iraq' genre. It is a comedy that makes light of personal tragedies and does it gracefully. I watched it in a 'combi pack' with 'Stop Loss', the much more serious film about soldiers who are forced to return to the front after their contracted term has expired.

In The Lucky Ones, Robbins is a sergeant who has completed his term and who looks forward to return to wife and teenage son. Pena and McAdams are on a 30 days home leave. The three get accidentally grouped together for a car trip from New York to Las Vegas and experience the difficulties of outsiders in an ambiguous situation. None of them has stable social circumstances, as even the Robbins character finds out to his shock. Their social backgrounds are quite divergent. They are variously feted as war heroes or attacked by the home crowd for being either too stupid to stay away from trouble or too luke warm about the war effort itself. The backseat drivers in middle American require heroic attitudes, not a statement that survival is a soldier's main objective.
This is the kind of movie that discusses problems without indoctrinating you.
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Format: DVD
While there are some disassociations with reality and home life for those stationed overseas in war, three returning wounded soldiers must objectively view their fortune when their home lives begin to dissolve around them. T.K. (Michael Pena), a leader returning to his fiancée in a precarious situation; Cheaver (Tim Robbins), an old veteran who is bidding adieu to his Army career but facing a home life that is potentially more volatile than war; and Colee (Rachel McAdams), a naïve but fresh-faced Private returning a loved one's heirloom to his family while dragging around her bum leg.

This wonderful tale of three soldiers sharing time on a cross-country road trip moves a bit slowly, but the realism, character development, and impeccable acting helps the pacing move along a bit. Friendship among the three appears to be real, and their bond forms quickly as they learn about one another's life and troubles. Charming chemistry is tough to come by; yet the camaraderie among these three returning soldiers feels genuine.

Much like Home of the Brave, there are some unfortunate clichés holding back the script. Not all soldiers sleep in their PTs, all soldiers coming home from war do not have PTSD, and despite what Hollywood would have us believe, they don't resort to violence as a first response to difficult situations when they have difficulties fitting into "normal" society. It's just a slanted view of troubled soldiers that gives the impression of people who are different from the rest of us, and I wish there were more movies that showed similarities instead of perceived differences. Our society has evolved quite a bit since the post-Vietnam days. I hate to say it, but I suspect this paragraph has something to do with Tim Robbins' politics.
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