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Precious 2009 R CC

Precious Jones, an inner-city high school girl, is illiterate, overweight, and pregnant...again. Nave and abused, Precious responds to a glimmer of hope when a door is opened by an alternative-school teacher. She is faced with the choice to follow opportunity and test her own boundaries. Prepare for shock, revelation and celebration.

Starring:
Gabourey Sidibe, Mo'Nique
Runtime:
1 hour, 49 minutes

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Product Details

Genres Drama
Director Lee Daniels
Starring Gabourey Sidibe, Mo'Nique
Supporting actors Paula Patton, Mariah Carey, Sherri Shepherd, Lenny Kravitz, Stephanie Andujar, Chyna Layne, Amina Robinson, Xosha Roquemore, Angelic Zambrana, Aunt Dot, Nealla Gordon, Grace Hightower, Barret Helms, Kimberly Russell, Bill Sage, Susan Taylor, Kendall Toombs, Alexander Toombs
Studio Lionsgate
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Perhaps "thought provoking" isn't the right phrase to use. This movie will whip you about and leave you breathless, most especially if you've never really considered the plight of children/people like Precious.

I have been teaching adult students for a little over ten years now, and I have had many women whose backgrounds were similar to Precious' background, so the subject matter wasn't new to me. I expected to be moved, but I didn't expect to have to struggle to stop crying after the movie was over.

The movie is about a teenager named Precious (a truly ironic name, as she is told and shown repeatedly that she is NOT precious to anyone in her immediate circle) and the horrific circumstances of her life at the age of 16. She is pregnant with her second child, the product of incest (her "father" rapes her, a fact which her mother chooses instead to see as Precious threatening her by taking away her man and giving him more babies than he ever allowed the mom to have), and she is barely holding together some semblance of a normal life by keeping her true circumstances from everyone around her.

When her school principal becomes aware of her pregnancy, she decides to send Precious to an alternative school, and for the first time, the teenager has an opportunity to see her own potential and to have that potential respected by others. It's a truly life-altering opportunity, and Precious takes it.

What's really amazing in this film is the excellence of the acting. You've likely heard time and time again how Mariah Carey doesn't wear makeup and looks haggard and old, and you've probably heard about Monique's superb turn as Precious' mother. What can't be conveyed without you actually watching the movie is what all that means.
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18 Comments 181 of 193 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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To my surprise, this soul-baring 2009 drama is neither as painful nor depressing as the subject matter would imply. In fact, director Lee Daniels' treatment alternates so fluently between gritty realism, social uplift, and fanciful episodes of fantasy that the end result is as much enthralling as it is emotionally draining. First-time screenwriter Geoffrey Fletcher does a solid job adapting the 1996 source novel by Sapphire, Push, but the strength and honesty of the cast is what sears in the memory. Daniels could have been otherwise charged with stunt casting had he not drawn out such powerhouse work from the out-of-left-field likes of comedienne Mo'Nique and pop diva Mariah Carey. Granted Daniels in his second directorial effort is not the most subtle of filmmakers (his first film was the strangely exotic Shadowboxer), but he does bring a level of florid passion that the subject desperately needs to alleviate the unrelenting bleakness of the title character's existence.

Set in Harlem in 1987, the story centers on sixteen-year-old Claireece "Precious" Jones, a morbidly obese girl so void of self-worth that she refers to herself without irony as "ugly black grease to be washed from the street". Nearly illiterate, she finds herself pregnant for the second time by her father, and the school principal arranges to enroll Precious at an "alternative" institution. She recognizes this as an opportunity to better herself, but her mother Mary discourages it and forces Precious to apply for welfare.
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5 Comments 50 of 56 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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This movie shows the reality of lives that are affected by incest and where choice seems a fairy tale. Both of Precious' parents are locked in a life of immorality and illegality and have no way out. Precious too seems headed down that road but for the intervention of her principal that moves her to an alternative school where she can get individual attention and where her past does not have to swallow her. Much abusive language but the effect puts the viewer into Precious' life so that you too can experience the threats and put downs. Not for the faint hearted but more films like this are needed to awake the world to the effects of incest and ridicule. First class acting throughout. A must see really! It is ironic that all of the people I know named Precious have had lives that attempted to stunt their development. What's in a name?
Comment 39 of 45 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Precious takes you on an emotional journey that you will not likely forget. There are some remarkable performances but the only one that stands out is Monique's character. She plays an abusive mother that knowingly let her daughter be molested. She actually blames Precious for her man leaving. She is so full of self hatred and anger it's hard to see how Precious has survived this long. The young lady playing Precious does a great job of portraying how broken Precious is. Precious's imagination is the only thing that gives her a break from all the abuse. I can't imagine anyone else playing the role of Precious. Mariah Carey has a small part in this movie. Her acting skills have improved but wow she looks really old without makeup. Some people will go to see this thinking that it's one of those inspirational movies. This is not one of those movies where at the end something positive happens and things start to look up for the main character. Things look even worse for Precious at the end of this film. Please keep an open mind. I actually wanted to give this movie 5 stars but it feels unfinished. You feel a little cheated at the end of the movie because nothing is resolved. However, Precious is easily one of the most captivating films i've seen in awhile. Not only is this one a Must See, you have to buy this one. It will be a welcomed edition to my dvd collection. HOLLA
2 Comments 9 of 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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