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Shutter Island 2010 R CC

(868) IMDb 8.1/10
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Academy Award winning director MARTIN SCORSESE once again teams up with LEONARDO DICAPRIO in this spine-chilling thriller that critics say "sizzles with so much suspense that it's hot to the touch."** When U.S. Marshal Teddy Daniels (DiCaprio) arrives at the asylum for the criminally insane on Shutter Island, what starts as a routine investigation quickly takes a sinister turn. As the investigation unfolds and Teddy uncovers more shocking and terrifying truths about the island, he learns there are some places that never let you go. **Peter Travers, ROLLING STONE.

Starring:
Leonardo DiCaprio, Mark Ruffalo
Runtime:
2 hours, 19 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

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Product Details

Genres Thriller, Mystery
Director Martin Scorsese
Starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Mark Ruffalo
Supporting actors Ben Kingsley, Max von Sydow, Michelle Williams, Emily Mortimer, Patricia Clarkson, Jackie Earle Haley, Ted Levine, John Carroll Lynch, Elias Koteas, Robin Bartlett, Christopher Denham, Nellie Sciutto, Joseph Sikora, Curtiss Cook, Raymond Anthony Thomas, Joseph McKenna, Ruby Jerins, Tom Kemp
Studio Paramount
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 48 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

99 of 104 people found the following review helpful By Lostgirl on June 12, 2010
Format: DVD
I think that some of the mixed things I'd heard about it come from the fact that some audiences were a) expecting something different and b) don't like to think. To be fair the studio mislead them by selling Shutter Island as a fun, edge of your seat, thrill ride. It's really a psychological drama disguised as a B grade horror movie. It indulges in all the gothic tropes: the isolated mental hospital, the hurricane that cuts everything off from civilization, hints of Nazi experiments, even the music plays into it. But really that's just the setting. If you take it as the whole thing, that's where you'll run into disappointment. It's more about what's happening in the mind of the main character- which is a puzzle in itself- than the big twist ending. I think that The Sixth Sense and others of it's ilk did a disservice to audiences in a sense. People look for the "trick" in movies, studios advertise the "big twist ending". But this isn't a movie about a twist. Yes, there's a big reveal in the end, and the "what" of the reveal is fairly obvious. It's the "how" and the "why" that we should be thinking about. These are the answers to the psychological puzzle of the film. People get so into the "what" after being groomed on twist endings that they forget there is a "how" and a "why". When the big reveal comes it's more about the catharsis, the coming full circle, the emotional confrontation, than the twist itself.

Yes, it can be confusing not to know whether the main character is dreaming or hallucinating, or really seeing what is. But with patience that becomes clear and the beautifully photographed, eerily haunting dream sequences are worth watching without trying to "figure them out".
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158 of 172 people found the following review helpful By Robin Friedman HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on March 15, 2010
Format: DVD
I tend to look for movies that draw me in and that provoke an emotional response. Martin Scorcese's "Shutter Island" did indeed draw me in, even though I found the film disturbing. Scorcese explores difficult questions of guilt, personal identity, and mind control.

The movie takes place in 1954 on a craggy, remote and forbidding island off the coast of Boston. (I have some familiarity with a United States possession called Navassa, an uninhabited, little-known island in the Carribean surrounded by steep, inaccessible cliffs and was reminded of Navassa by the movie.) Shutter Island serves as a hospital and prison for the criminally insane operated by the United States government. A United States Marshall, Teddy Daniels, and his ostensible partner, Chuck Aule, who calls Daniels "boss", are ferried to Shutter Island to investigate the disappearance of a female inmate who has apparently escaped. The inmate is said to have drowned her three children before her incarceration. Daniels himself carries with him many emotional issues. He witnessed the liberation of the Dachau concentration camp and has had problems with alcohol. His wife died in a fire set by an arsonist. Daniels sought an assignment to Shutter Island because the arsonist and another individual from Daniels' past are incarcerated there, and Daniels wanted to see for himself what was going on.

At the hospital, Daniels meets the head psychiatrist, a bearded, crafty and intelligent individual named Cawley, and his sinister German assistant, Nehring. He meets with staff, with prisoners, both male and female, and with inmates of the "C" ward, used to house the most dangerous prisoners.
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34 of 37 people found the following review helpful By Hudson on June 11, 2010
Format: DVD
It goes without saying that Martin Scorsese is an incredible filmmaker. He has added another classic to his resume with the mind-bending thriller, "Shutter Island". The film stars Leonardo DiCaprio as a federal marshal who is investigating the disappearance of a patient / prisoner from a mental institution for the criminally insane. DiCaprio shines in his part, perhaps brighter than he has in any other Scorsese film. He is accompanied by Ben Kingsley, Mark Ruffalo, Max von Sydow, Ted Levine and Jackie Earle Haley, amongst others. "Shutter Island" does a great job of playing mind games with the viewer. This film makes for a great DVD to own, because you can watch it as many times as you would like and you can discover new clues in the plot over and over again. Also, after viewing the film the first time, once you know the outcome of the plot, subsequent viewings are really terrifying if you put yourself in the main character's shoes, knowing the ending. That's what I do when I watch the film now, and I think it's genuinely scary because it is so competently written. Scorsese's direction is excellent, as are all the actors' performances in the film. The film is a dark noir styled trip down the rabbit hole that is frightful and tense throughout. Definitely a modern Scorsese classic here, folks. Well worth checking out, multiple times. Highly recommended! 4.5 stars.
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37 of 47 people found the following review helpful By Jacques COULARDEAU on April 11, 2010
Format: DVD
It is in many ways a great film. It questions the "heritage" of the Second World War and the horror the American soldiers discovered in the camps, in this case here Dachau. It is also more than clear on the passage of some of the researchers of Nazi Germany to the US to continue their research in peace, including if necessary with human experiments when dealing with medical research. It is unluckily well-known that prisons and orphanages were places of hellish torturing and violence in the name of research or reform. That's the first level of the film. The second level is: what can society do with the few human beings who are so bad that they can't be reformed? Various solutions are available: lobotomizing them to turn them into docile pets, pharmaceuticalizing their cases so that they become chemical zombies, or manipulating their minds to make them convinced of what they have done and of the necessary punishment called treatment they are receiving. The film goes even as far as imagining the production of human killing tools that could be used in wars. Surgery, drugs or mental manipulation, that's the choices envisaged here. The three of them are all just fully wrong. But the film is a lot more disquieting than that if we deal with the simple fact that the decision of a psychiatrist to classify you as anything psychic or psychological is absolutely irreversible and everything you may say or do to prove you are not will be turned into the evidence that you are and will be used against you. In other words the lady always protests too much. That's the Kafka aspect of the tale.Read more ›
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