Frozen 2010 R CC

(401) IMDb 6.2/10
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A typical day on the slopes turns into a chilling nightmare for three snowboarders when they get stranded on the chairlift before their last run. As the ski patrol switches off the night lights, they realize with growing panic that they've been left behind, dangling high off the ground with no way down.

Starring:
Emma Bell, Shawn Ashmore
Runtime:
1 hour, 34 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Thriller
Director Adam Green
Starring Emma Bell, Shawn Ashmore
Supporting actors Kevin Zegers, Ed Ackerman, Rileah Vanderbilt, Kane Hodder, Adam Johnson, Chris York, Peder Melhuse, Will Barratt, Adam Green, Joe Lynch, John Omohundro, Cody Blue Snider, Dee Snider
Studio Anchor Bay
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 48 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

105 of 124 people found the following review helpful By Chris Pandolfi on February 22, 2010
Format: DVD
We've seen so many thrillers in which the threat comes from something unnatural, be it a ghost, a zombie, or a masked serial killer that cannot himself be killed. This is partly why "Frozen" is such a refreshing experience - nature itself is the threat. Human beings are capable of withstanding a great deal, but there's always a breaking point, and this movie does a pretty good job of searching for it. It begs the question: What would you do if you found yourself in a similar situation? Is there anything that could be done? Or is it merely a matter of waiting to die? For something that very easily could have been a mindless shock fest, "Frozen" is instead an effective story where suspense builds from a fairly plausible situation.

As far as the plot is concerned, there isn't all that much to describe. In fact, it can all be summed up in one sentence: At a mountain resort, three college kids struggle to survive when they're left stranded on a ski lift. Everything depends on how the plot advances, and this includes character development, which is surprisingly strong. Dan (Kevin Zegers) and Lynch (Shawn Ashmore) have been friends since the first grade. Because of Dan's new girlfriend, Parker (Emma Bell), Lynch now feels that their friendship is in jeopardy; their skiing trips have traditionally been a Guys Only thing, and yet here she is, tagging along. For the first twenty minutes or so, Lynch repeatedly tells Parker, as nicely as possible, that she's in the way.

Hoping to get in one last hill before the ski lift closes for the night, the three smooth-talk their way onto the ski lift. Unfortunately, there are two lift operators, and the second one doesn't realize that the three skiers who have just descended are not the same three currently ascending the mountain.
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Format: Amazon Instant Video
A dubiously labeled "horror" film--"Frozen" is actually a surprisingly strong film about survival. If you were disappointed by "The Blair Witch Project" (a harrowing film about being lost, not about witches) or "Open Water" (a film more reliant on the drama of helplessness than on shark scares), then you will probably see little point to "Frozen." If, however, the very real frights of those films unsettled you--this film should tap into the same sensibilities and be right up your alley. An incredibly tense tale of three friends who are stranded on a ski lift, "Frozen" explores very real and powerful feelings of isolation and desperation as the trio comes to terms with their situation. Realizing that to survive is to act is only the first hurdle. Unfortunately, it seems as if nature itself is conspiring against the kids.

"Frozen" is a surprisingly sophisticated drama despite its very simple premise. The terror is understated and real (not at all what I was expecting from the director of the middling horror/comedy "Hatchet"). Kevin Zegers, Shawn Ashmore, and Emma Bell do a fantastic job bringing this unpleasant experience to life. From joking bravado, to quiet desperation, to regret and recriminations, to acceptance and action--you really feel tapped into the emotions and fear of the protagonists. That's why "Frozen" is so disturbing and so great. The middle third of the film is so intense and memorable, it will definitely stick with me as one of the most horrifyingly bleak things I've seen this year! And while the film does strive for a "scary" payoff with a bigger action sequence at the finale, the palpable sense of danger of the film's quieter moments is never equaled.

I truly think it is a disservice to market "Frozen" strictly in the horror category.
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15 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Pristine on December 19, 2010
Format: DVD
It's a good conversational piece. And it is shot nicely to qualify as entertainment and a movie. So if you accept situations presented to you and you can sustain the belief without asking any nagging questions, then it's a movie to pass time with. But there are certain junctures where the characters made certain decisions that seem to serve stretching a movie out to 90 minutes. Are these kids just young and inexperienced? For the amount of times one boy boasts of experiences from the past semesters, we are to believe they are college kids. But either the quality of college education isn't what it used to be, or the Darwin awards are at work here.

I watched this movie with two 40-something guys, and they were basically tearing their hair out throughout the movie. There's no sense of urgency at advancing nightfall, frostbite, hypothermia. When the sun is up and it is warm, people chat and talk. Decisions are made to act only near night time when the mercury drops. Jackets are not zipped all the way to the top, up to the full length of the zippers. Hands are left bare, out in the open, when they should be tucked inside to retain warmth. People should cuddle to sustain body heat. None of this takes place.

If I knew it was going to be five more days before the resort opened. I would say "everyone, take off your jackets and pants (they are the tough synthetic material ski apparel are made from these days that don't rip easily). Tie it end-to-end and let one person slide halfway down the makeshift "rope" to the bottom. Take a leap, tuck-and-roll. Pull the shirts / pants back up, put the clothing on, throw the guy his clothes on the bottom, and the guy goes for help. End of story.
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