Customer Reviews

18
3.7 out of 5 stars
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

21 of 22 people found the following review helpful
Beggars can't be choosers, and that seems to be true for takoyaki in the US. The delightful Osaka treat is rare enough even at Japanese restaurants, and the necessary implements for making it at home are even more so.

The absolute best set up is a round takoyaki pan, either on a gas or electric portable grill. Much of the fun of takoyaki comes from everyone sitting around the table and cooking together, putting in your favorite ingredients and popping the little balls out then eating them hot and fresh. That is how it is done in Japan, and home-cooking takoyaki isn't meant to be the province of a lone cook standing over a stove while everyone waits patiently for the food. It is a communal experience.

However, true takoyaki cookers are not readily available, and this pan is better than nothing. It doesn't take much, just a pan with round indents in it heavy enough to rest on the range while the balls are flipped over using long toothpicks. It isn't really designed to work with electric ranges, as they are pretty rare in Japan, but it does the trick. I don't recommend using the included steel pick, as it will scratch your pan and conduct heat while doing the flipping.
44 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on May 11, 2005
this is a pretty good item. comes in nice box, kinda heavy though, but one of the old fashion iron pans that make food taste great!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on April 29, 2012
I have a grill that looks exactly like this grill. The box art looks different so I'm guessing this is a standard grill that came from some factory and sold under different names. I think I got mine under 20 bucks at a local Japanese grocery store.

I love this takoyaki grill. It's the best thing short of the home version of the professional gas-powered grill that you see at Takoyaki stores in Japan. Works great on an electric stove (I have flat top) and even better on gas range. I've had a few grills of different sizes and shapes and this grill makes takoyaki balls large enough to satisfy and a dozen is great for each round. The size and shape of the grill is ideal for American stove tops. If any bigger or not square, it'd be too difficult to heat evenly. The handle is great. I think mine also came with the mop-head looking oil applicator. If yours does not, you can always use a wad of paper towel do apply the oil to the grill (make sure you get oil in each hole and around each hole).

If you're feeding your friends and family, you may want to pick up a second one and have them cooking concurrently. And while you're at it, you can teach them. Learning to make takoyaki is challenging but also very fun at the same time. The reward is a huge sense of accomplishment when you see your messy batter turn into round balls of perfection. Then you get to eat them! Learning to make takoyaki is like riding a bike. Once you learn, you're set.

Here are some tips for making good takoyaki - these are just my tips so YMMV:
- Heat the grill well. Use plenty of oil. I know it's not the healthiest thing but it avoids sticking. Also, change the temperature of the grill during the course of cooking. First keep it high, pour in the batter, then turn it down to med and slow cook the remaining way.
- DO NOT use the steel pick that comes with the grill. You will end up scratching the grill. Instead, go buy some bamboo picks that are often used for yakitori and kabobs. They work great.
- Buy flour specifically made for takoyaki. You can find it at Japanese grocery stores. It can be a bit expensive but it's way better than using conventional flour.
- When adding more than one egg, I usually use more egg whites than egg yolk. Egg whites help with the shape and crispiness but too much egg yolk changes the texture and flavor too much.
- I wash and take out the innards of the octopus and boil the octopus lightly so it's still soft (do not cook completely). Then you can chop up the semi-cooked octopus. I let the stock cool down and use that to mix with the takoyaki flour. You get more taste this way. You can add more stock to control the thickness of the batter. I add just enough so that the outside of the balls turn out crispy while the inside is still gooey. If you don't like the gooey inside, you can use less stock, but keep in mine authentic takoyaki has gooey inside :)

Where can you get octopus? You can get the big ones at Japanese grocery shops but they can be expensive. Usually, I just pick up the frozen packs at Korean grocery stores (i.e., H-mart, Assi). They're smaller and they're not the distinctive red octopus when you cook them but hey, they're cheaper.

Other ingredients (note, you can use these for okonomiyaki too)
You can find these at Japanese or Asian grocery shops:
- Diced green onions - add to batter if you like.
- Pickled red ginger - these are called "beni shoga" ("shoga" pronounced like "shouga") or "kizami shoga" usually for $2-3 in the refrigerated section. Chop these up and add to your tokoyaki right after you put tako in.
- Tenkasu - these are tempura batter shavings... totally optional. Put them in at the same time as red ginger.

Once takoyaki is off the grill and on the plate:
- Takoyaki or Okonomiyaki sauce - this is the sauce you pour after taking takoyaki off the grill.. You can also use tonkatsu sauce instead.
- Ao-nori (literally means "blue nori" but is actually green) - this is shaved green laver and is a must in my book. Can be expensive though. Sprinkle after tonkatsu sauce.
- Katsuo-bushi (shaved bonito flakes) - Sprinkle on top after you pour sauce over finished takoyaki. This is usually the last step.
- Japanese mayonnaise - Buy Kewpie (Q.P.) mayonnaise in a tube. This tastes different from American mayo. You can just squeeze some off to the side on your plate and use to your liking.

Some may argue that you want to keep takoyaki simple with just batter and tako, while others love loading it up with everything. Just make it the way you like best! :)

Finally, as true with any cast iron grill, do not wash this grill! Just wipe it down clean with some oil and store it in a bag.

Enjoy!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on January 6, 2007
I always wanted to try takoyaki, make it myself you know. With this Takoyaki Pan I could. As the first reviewer said, it is heavy, but it's not bad. The Pan itself is big enouf to fit on a small burner on the stove. When I first opened it I was surprise how big the semi-spheres where, just good enouf to make the perfect size octopuss ball. Plus it comes with a pick, and a brush to oil the pan, cause it's not stick proof.

So anyway, it's a good product and all.

The shipping was fast and on time .
review image review image
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on January 12, 2009
The takoyaki pan in fact worked better for me over my electric range than the other range it was designed for. Outer depressions cooked more slowly than inner but on the whole electric dispensed the heat more evenly. As long as I liberally applied Pam with every batch I had no trouble in turning the takoyaki over. Though the included pick didn't scratch my pan I felt it was easier to flip the delicate dumplings the slighter wooden ones you can get in stores.

Add 1 part Sriracha hot chili sauce (with the rooster on the front) and 3 parts mayo for a terrific spicy sauce.

No complaints here! Very satisfied I can have this delicious and under appreciated treat whenever I please!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on July 15, 2010
Verified Purchase
Product shipped fast! A little smaller than I was expecting but it's nice not to have to store a big, heavy pan. The pan is approximately 8X8" with a handle that unscrews for compact storage. I am using a gas stove and I find the heat distribution is uneven...The middle sections cook much faster than the holes in the periphery. So it is a bit of a balancing act to get them all cooked right (but it is do-able). I am sure if you had a different heat source you may have better luck heating the pan evenly. I would recommend "seasoning" the pan before use. It is relatively nonstick but I use mine to make Ebelskivers and I always spray butter into each hole before pouring the batter. LOVE the turning stick it comes with. Works like a charm. All in all I'd say it was a decent purchase.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on December 14, 2010
Verified Purchase
The plate is very nice, except that the image has an octopus painted over.
I am very happy.
Thanks
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on May 14, 2008
Verified Purchase
Much better than the pancake puff. It makes 12 puffs as opposed to the pancake puff's 7, you don't need to pay extra for the handle cover because this already has a wooden handle, and it has a metal poker/flipper so yo don't need a lifetime supply of the wooden ones. I love it.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on September 21, 2010
In the description i doesn't say that it comes w. the little steal pick but it does. we made them for the first time and it tasted great!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Only writing this review so people are informed that it works and that there are certain requirements needed to be done before using this takoyaki grill set. First off like most cast iron equipment you need to "season" your cast iron which you basically coat the whole surface of the grill then blast it in broil for the oil to basically dry out on it, don't forget to let it air dry since you don't want to run cold water on it while its scalding it might cause it to crack. After all is said and done it will work fine no sticking etc etc.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Questions? Get fast answers from reviewers

Please make sure that you've entered a valid question. You can edit your question or post anyway.
Please enter a question.

     
 
Customers who viewed this also viewed


 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.

Your Recently Viewed Items and Featured Recommendations 
 

After viewing product detail pages, look here to find an easy way to navigate back to pages you are interested in.