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The education of Cyrus (Everyman's library, ed. by E. Rhys. Classical. [no. 672]) Hardcover – January 1, 1914


 
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Hardcover, January 1, 1914

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--This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition.

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Product Details

  • Series: Everyman's library, ed. by E. Rhys. Classical. [no. 672]
  • Hardcover: 305 pages
  • Publisher: E.P. Dutton & co (1914)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B000855KG6
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #9,196,637 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Wayne Ambler's elegant translation deserves to become the standard English version of this work."—The Weekly Standard



"There are many reasons to welcome this fresh, precise, and graceful English rendering of the Cyropaedia, the first since 1914. It is, of course, a central text for the study of Greek military technique in the age of professional warfare that leads up to Alexander. But it is much, much more. . . . Ambler's superb translation, accompanied by a glossary that matches key terms in the Greek with their semantic fields in English, and excellent notes, is an unfailing guide to the nuances of the Greek text and is bound to become the standard English reference edition."—Journal of Military History



"The Education of Cyrus is a major work of classical political philosophy that provides a portrait of extraordinary political ambition. . . . Ambler's precise translation makes it possible to engage in a close textual reading that establishes Xenophon as an important political thinker."—Translation Review



"I'm delighted, even profoundly moved, by Wayne Ambler's new translation of The Education of Cyrus. For the first time this entrancing book will be available in trustworthy English; we get fresh and reliable access to Xenophon's timeless portrait, perhaps the best ever, of extraordinary political ambition."—Robert Faulkner, Boston College



"Xenophon's The Education of Cyrus is a political masterpiece on the order of Machiavelli's The Prince. Xenophon makes Cyrus, his exemplary king, a worthy rival to Socrates, his ideal philosopher. This precise new translation is most welcome."—David O'Connor, University of Notre Dame



"At a time of renewed interest in Xenophon, and The Education of Cyrus in particular, Wayne Ambler has produced the most accurate and useful English translation to date. Only with this definitive translation can students profitably engage in the kind of close textual reading necessary to make sense of Xenophon as an important political thinker."—Christopher Nadon, Trinity College, author of Xenophon's Prince: Republic and Empire in the Cyropaedia



"At long last, Xenophon's masterpiece is available in an absolutely reliable translation that conveys even the charms of the original: clarity and grace, profundity and levity. An exemplary rendering of a marvelous book."—Robert Bartlett, Emory University



"The Education of Cyrus is a major work of classical political philosophy and Wayne Ambler's very impressive English translation is far superior to any other that I have seen."—Peter Ahrensdorf, Davidson College

--This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition.

Language Notes

Text: English (translation)
Original Language: Greek --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

28 of 30 people found the following review helpful By "u2121873" on February 24, 2003
Format: Paperback
Herodotus' Histories is often considered the gold standard of knowledge pertaining to the Persian empire. Little is made of the fact that this Ionian had certain political grudges against his political masters and had never visited Persia or had entry into Persian society. Xenophone however was a nobleman who lived amongst the Persians and the Medes and was acquaianted with their ways and histories. Xenophone's observations on Persian society and religion are far closer to modern scholarship than Herodotus. Furthermore even the chronological inaccuracies of Cyropaedia are in the Persian tradition. As evidenced by Sassanian histories, the Persians had the habit of attributing the conquests of dynasties to their founders. However the most fascinating and thrilling aspect of reading this book is that the educational stories attributed to Cyrus are identical to the stories found in Adab or the Persian courtly literature of Islamic era. Given that Xenophone was not translated into Persian or Arabic, this confirms the authenticity of the materials used by Xenophone. I love this book and have read it twice already. I recommend it to anyone who wants to have a closer look at the realities of Persia.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By ScipioColumbus on September 28, 2005
Format: Paperback
This truly is one of the most remarkable books I've ever read and I would encourage anyone with an interest in military science, government or leadership to take the time to read it. This book requires commitment and a quiet place to read and savor its thought-provoking passages. The investment of time and effort is dwarfed by the magnitude of the lessons this book has to offer. Make the commitment and you'll see why this book was a favorite of men like Alexander the Great, Scipio Africanus, Caesar and Machiavelli.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Ryan Mease on November 27, 2009
Format: Paperback
This translation is incredibly easy to read; I enjoyed it very much. My only complaint is that it uses endnotes rather than footnotes. Even so, the translation is so approachable that one can garner much from this work with little historical background. The introduction is interesting if a bit of a ramble.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
An excellent book that has more than its fair share of lessons to be learned by just about anybody. Purchased for a class but feel there is even more to be pulled from it than what we managed to.
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By Jessica Boissonneault on July 30, 2014
Format: Paperback
Really excellent condition, format is great, awesome read.
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16 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Ashok Karra on December 8, 2003
Format: Paperback
This book is not in the style of a Platonic dialogue, or a play (whether a tragedy or comedy), a Homeric epic (but if you're careful, you'll note parallels), or a history (like Herodotus).
No, Xenophon - a contemporary of Plato's, a student of Socrates - was considered a philosopher way back when. He tells a story and you might think it is a history that is meant to be accurate. There is nothing accurate about Xenophon's use of history in this book; however, the story is well-told and funny, and the prose moves fast in this edition. (Which was your primary concern, of course: that this was a good read.)
He does teach philosophy - ancient philosophy concerned with ethics and politics - in an interesting way. The plot of the book is as follows: Cyrus of Persia receives an education unlike any of his peers. With that education, and a considerable bit of ruthlessness, he attempts to take over the world.
It's difficult to write a story where different philosophical viewpoints define characters and events. Somehow, Xenophon pulls this off, and manages to entertain his reader with tales of battles, lots of humorous exchanges between characters, and even some love stories strewn throughout.
(If you do Classics, you probably want to get acquainted with Xenophon, fast.)
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