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The Skin I Live In 2011 R CC

(165) IMDb 7.6/10
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A gifted plastic surgeon (Antonio Banderas) exacts revenge on the young man who assaulted his daughter. A shocking tale of retribution and obsession from Oscar-winning filmmaker Pedro Almodovar.

Antonio Banderas, Elena Anaya
2 hours, 1 minute

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Product Details

Genres Thriller, International
Director Pedro Almodóvar
Starring Antonio Banderas, Elena Anaya
Supporting actors Marisa Paredes, Jan Cornet, Roberto Álamo, Eduard Fernández, José Luis Gómez, Blanca Suárez, Susi Sánchez, Bárbara Lennie, Fernando Cayo, Chema Ruiz, Buika, Ana Mena, Teresa Manresa, Fernando Iglesias, Agustín Almodóvar, Miguel Almodóvar, Marta R. Mahou, Guillermo Carbajo
Studio Sony Pictures Classics
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

91 of 97 people found the following review helpful By Whitt Patrick Pond TOP 1000 REVIEWER on December 19, 2011
Format: Blu-ray
The most important thing I can tell you about Pedro Almodóvar's film, The Skin I Live In (original Spanish title: La piel que habito) is that you should avoid as much as possible knowing anything about it beyond the most basic setup before seeing it. This is one of those cases where spoilers truly can rob you of the full experience of a film. I say this as someone who went into the movie knowing little about it beyond the fact that Pedro Almodóvar directed it and that it had to do with a plastic surgeon obsessed with a mysterious female patient. And that really is the best way to see it.

Adapted from Thierry Jonquet's novel Tarantula (original French title: Mygale) by Pedro Almodóvar and his brother Agustín Almodóvar, The Skin I Live In is a complex and, as the background layers are peeled away through revelation, deeply disturbing and chilling film.

It begins in the present day where we see Robert Legard (Antonio Banderas), a prominent plastic surgeon and medical researcher who, because of the tragic death of his wife in a fiery auto accident several years earlier, is obsessed with creating a new kind of skin superior to the skin we're born with, one that is not only both tougher and more resistant to burning and injury but also heals quicker and with little to no scarring. In his mansion, Dr. Legard has a special patient under his private, personal care, a young woman named Vera (Elena Anaya), on whom he is trying his new skin out. Our first impression is that Vera is a burn victim that Legrand is caring for, but it quickly becomes clear that Vera is more prisoner than patient. But just who is Vera? And how did she come into Legrand's rather questionable 'care'? And why does she so strongly resemble Legrand's dead wife?
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By K. Gordon on April 7, 2012
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
A fascinating and powerful departure for Almodovar, or perhaps more
accurately more an terrific hybrid of the best of his old and new.
This has the darker, more actively perversely disturbing and violent themes
of some of his early work like 'Matador' but shot and directed with the
far smoother and more mature hand he has developed over the years. It
also uses the more complex and fractured time structure style of
Almodovar's more recent work, to great effect.

In the end it's a gorgeous looking, philosophically complex mystery and
horror film. Although not gory, this is a disturbing work, both on a
literal story level, and also for the questions it raises about sexual and personal
identity, love, sado-masochism, and passion run amok.

These themes are all Almodovar touchstones, but delivered here with a
visually stunning icy touch, and with much more complete logic than in
his early works, which often felt less fully thought through, and had
more frustrating plot holes and character leaps.

Not a 'scary' film, but a creepy, moody and highly effective one. A
dark fairy tale as told by, say Stanley Kubrick.

It's good to see Antonio Banderas reunited with Almodovar, and he
delivers a wonderfully complex and quirky modern day Dr. Frankenstein.

Less emotional than my two very favorite Almodovar films (Talk to Her,
All About My Mother), but its exciting to see this extremely talented
film maker continue to evolve and grow, and I think this represents
work that can stand among his best.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Judy Croome on November 2, 2013
Format: DVD
As a movie to watch on Halloween I couldn't have chosen a better DVD. Pedro Almodóvar's film, The Skin I Live In (we watched the original Spanish version La piel que habito, with excellent English sub-titles) is a movie that proves the power of the imagination is far more chilling and intense than any graphic or gratuitous violence can ever be.

It's impossible to review the movie without giving away too much of the complex and clever plot and it's that which keeps you breathless throughout the whole 115 minutes. All the cast presented superb performances, from the brutal Zeca (Roberto Álamo) to the foolish Vincente (Jan Cornet), from the blindly loyal Marilia (Marisa Paredes) to the haunted Vera(Elena Anaya).

However, it was the commanding performance of Antonio Banderas as prominent surgeon and researcher Dr Robert Legard who played a pivotal role. In the hands of a lesser actor, the labyrinthine torment that motivated Legard's actions could easily have become parody; Banderas played the role to perfection.

Although Almodóvar kept the tension high right until the penultimate scene, the final scene was less satisfying than the rest of the film demanded, although I'm sure many viewers will be perfectly satisfied with it. If Banderas' performance of Legard had not been so immaculate, I may have been satisfied with the ending but, as it is, the complexities of love and desire which were explored in the final stages of the relationship between Legard and Vera had too-convenient a resolution.

Still, it was a strong enough ending to keep the movie a 5* viewing experience that is both thought-provoking and powerful. And far too scary, even for Halloween!
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