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[UPDATED] asked by Carolyn on April 8, 2010
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A
Jumping through hoops and "not deep thinking" are not confined only to academic pursuits. These symptoms of organizational disease exist in almost every medium-to-large-sized American corporation.
Michael L. Preiss answered on April 15, 2010
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A
I am not currently involved in any such organization and my experience with the business world is minimal, but I would guess it is most probably true of that as well.
Carolyn answered on April 15, 2010
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A
If success is defined as accomplishing your goals, and Langan's goal was to become an academic, he might be considered a failure in that respect. But if his goal was simply to be gainfully employed or to be a bouncer, then by this definition he would be considered a success. Whether or not a person is successful depends on what your definition of success is.
VioletVal answered on April 21, 2010
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I agree with that statement. However, sometimes the initial goal doesn't satisfy and another definition of success becomes necessary. Goals are one thing, but people change their ideas. The book never stated what his goals were. He came from difficult beginnings and perhaps just surviving was the goal.

He probably knows things nobody else knows and the author's view is that his only chance to be "taken seriously" would be to achieve academic credentials. However, I believe there may not be many people who would understand his ideas because of his extremely high IQ.
Carolyn answered on April 22, 2010
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