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Have you noticed Reviews becoming meaner?


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In reply to an earlier post on Jan 23, 2011 8:21:28 AM PST
Sara Howard says:
Walter, I flew in the 60s with VFR. I was working on my IFR rating when I found out that I was pregnant with 2nd son.
Doctors then were boobs and didn't want pregnant women to do ANYTHING. My flying years are a chapter in my book, "Something Funny Happened on the Way to the Moon."
I'm sorry about your non-flying career. Fate can be cruel. I agree that flying is VERY expensive.
Neil can be very funny. BTW Neil is BIG--he is well over 6 feet but not fat. One of his books is, "Death by Black Hole."
Even my non-science hubby laughed out loud.
I want to tell you another thing. Our family is 3rd Gen. U.S. Marine Corps. My father-in-law fought on Iwo Jima and in Korea. My husband was in Vietnam while I was working on Apollo. Our son just retired after 20 years as a Marine Corps Aviator. He received an Air Medal from the President of the U.S. for an incredible air rescue. He spent the last 4 yrs of his career teaching at the U.S. Naval Academy. We all have served this country we love with honor.
I would like to ask you to read the reviews on my book:
Something Funny Happened on the Way to the Moon
Then could you ask your local library to carry my book? The ISBN is: 9781609110635.
Just talk to :the acquisitions dept.
I would be forever grateful!!

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 23, 2011 2:00:16 PM PST
TO: Sara Howard

There might be problems with using nuclear engines for launch, but once you get to LEO, nuclear power is obviously the way to go for lunar trips and ANY trips beyond cis-lunar space - especially asteroid interception, if that ever becomes necessary. (I am, of course, ignoring all of the POLITICAL problems that would be caused by technophobes.)

RE: "I want to ask you something: "Why are you interested in returning to the moon?""

Why, that's obvious; the moon would be an excellent source for all kinds of resources. Because it's at the bottom of a gravity well (admittedly, not one as strong or extensive as Earth's, but you need to use up fuel to land and leave again), it wouldn't be as good a resource base as would the Asteriod Belt, but you have to crawl before you can walk. Yeah, I realize that the Belt is a long way out - and back - but there are all those lovely metals and elements out there! Another case for nuclear propulsion!

Also, the moon could serve as a maintenance base, a construction center, a rescue station, and research and exploration center, and an R & R haven. And the long-term commercial possibilities are endless! All of this presupposes the beginnings of an era of permanent human activity in, and habitation of, the space environment.

Posted on Jan 23, 2011 2:34:36 PM PST
Sara Howard says:
Walter, there is a problem in using nuclear power other than interception to an asteroid or to journey elsewhere. You're right, it should never be used for launch. People would go bonkers. I have never seen such fear as nuclear power generates. Some years ago we travelled to England and Europe. Beautiful clear skies. Here: crap. You've flown I assume. See the layer of brown in our skies? Jet fuel pollution. Europe has safe 100% nuclear power without any disasters. People do not realize that there was no casualty or death in three-mile Island. It is up and running just fine.
There is a reasonable solution to any asteroid problem and Rusty and Neil created it. I know I am all over the map but I have some chores to do.
I am going to weigh in on settling the moon. Here are some problems: 1. Micrometeorites, 2. radiation from cosmic rays and gamma rays, never mind
our sun (flares and CMEs) 3. the working environment 4. garbage 5. heavy equipment needed for many tasks 6. what fuel would be used to power the moon station? 7. and last but not least: has anyone worked in a spacesuit for very long times? Ugh, yuk!
There would be so much required for this, I think it maybe would be done by private enterprise. The tonnage is mind-boggling. Smile.
Gotta go!

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 23, 2011 3:18:03 PM PST
TO: Sara Howard

I do intend to read Dr. Tyson's book. I've already reserved a copy at the public library.

RE: "I want to tell you another thing. Our family is 3rd Gen. U.S. Marine Corps. My father-in-law fought on Iwo Jima and in Korea. My husband was in Vietnam while I was working on Apollo. Our son just retired after 20 years as a Marine Corps Aviator. He received an Air Medal from the President of the U.S. for an incredible air rescue. He spent the last 4 yrs of his career teaching at the U.S. Naval Academy. We all have served this country we love with honor."

My gratitude to you and your family for your service. Thank you.

RE: "I would like to ask you to read the reviews on my book:
Something Funny Happened on the Way to the Moon
Then could you ask your local library to carry my book? The ISBN is: 9781609110635."

I've already read the reviews and requested the library to order it. I've also put it on my Amazon wish list. I can't buy EVERYTHING I want all at once! (smile)

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 23, 2011 4:09:55 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 23, 2011 4:14:32 PM PST
TO: Sara Howard

RE: "I have never seen such fear as nuclear power generates."

Well, Joseph Goebbels showed that if you incessantly hammer people with the same propaganda, many, if not most, will believe it. In the '60s and '70s, the anti-nukes and other technophobes were a fringe element. Today it is part of conventional wisdom to be "green." And, given that much of the general public (especially the political and chattering classes) is ignorant about science and technology - and insistent on remaining that way - it bodes ill for any sort of rational development in the future. Well, it may not be THAT bad, but it is an uphill climb for rationalists and technologists.

RE: "1. Micrometeorites, 2. radiation from cosmic rays and gamma rays, never mind our sun (flares and CMEs)"

We could build underground. One example: did a trench, drop a cylindrical habitat into it, and cover it up.

RE: "3. the working environment"

Vacuum. Of course we'll need better spacesuits. Work is being done now on skin-tight (not bulky) spacesuits.

RE: "4. garbage"

Much of it would, of course, be recycled. The rest could be sterilized and buried.

RE: "5. heavy equipment needed for many tasks "

Of course, we wouldn't use a current production Caterpillar bulldozer, backhoe, or crane on the moon. Obviously, the whole concept of "heavy" equipment will have to be rethought. Special machines will have to be designed and built.

RE: "6. what fuel would be used to power the moon station?"

There are several possibilities that immediately come to mind. Nuclear power. Solar power. You could have an HUGE area covered with photovoltaic cells or other kinds of solar panels. Of course, a provision would have to be made to store power for use during the moon's 14-day dark period. Solar power satellites in polar orbit around the moon; they would beam the power down, using microwaves, for example. (That may or may not be the best transmission medium; I am NOT an RF or electronics engineer.) Those are the most obvious; there are other possibilities, magnetohydrodymics (MHD) for example.

RE: "7. and last but not least: has anyone worked in a spacesuit for very long times? Ugh, yuk!"

Yes, I know, current spacesuits are VERY tiring. Fortunately, development of new spacesuits is ongoing. Please see the following link: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2007/07/photogalleries/spacesuit-pictures/

RE: "There would be so much required for this, I think it maybe would be done by private enterprise."

Exactly! It will have to be - eventually. Never underestimate the power of greed. As the Gordon Gekko character said in the movie "Wall Street," "Greed is good!" (smile)

Posted on Jan 25, 2011 8:22:21 AM PST
Sara Howard says:
To Walter: Thank you for your logical ideas about colonizing the moon. There are a few things that I disagree with--mainly the horrendous cost
at this time. NASA is struggling now and I talk to many employees. Talk about dis-heartened! I really feel for them. I remember the terrible time in 1974 when Pres. Nixon canned everybody. That is a terrible story. Our American Apollo documents were grabbed by the Brits and Canadians.
Did you know that in the National Archives in Atlanta, there are hundreds of unmarked boxes about Apollo? Makes me very sad.
P.S. It is not the length of time one must wear a space suit--it is lack of facilities. (smile).

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 25, 2011 6:57:38 PM PST
TO: Sara Howard

RE: "...mainly the horrendous cost at this time."

Well, "at this time" is the key phrase. I am assuming that work is and will be done that will eventually bring the costs down, as has happened to all other human endeavors.

RE: "Our American Apollo documents were grabbed by the Brits and Canadians. Did you know that in the National Archives in Atlanta, there are hundreds of unmarked boxes about Apollo?"

I am not at all surpised. That's one big reason why the Constellation engineers had to visit aerospace junkyards to find parts, so they could reverse engineer them.

RE: "It is not the length of time one must wear a space suit--it is lack of facilities."

I wasn't referring to the length of time in a spacesuit. I was referring to the fact that current spacesuits are STIFF and it takes work to move in them, especially since most of our EVA experience is in orbit, where there's no place to stand and no gravity to assist you. At least, working on the moon wouldn't be quite as hard as that!

Regarding restroom breaks, aren't there drugs that will inhibit all excretory functions for a few hours, or to take the opposite strategy, cause the body to immediately eliminate all wastes AT ONCE, before one suits up for an EVA? I do know that providing adequate systems for bodily wastes continues to be a serious problem in spacesuit design.

Posted on Jan 26, 2011 11:52:31 AM PST
Sara Howard says:
Walter, I am up to my bones in alligators. Unbelievable avalanche. Sorry I cannot continue. I don't know when I can.
Hopefully we can chat again sometime. Good luck to you in building your moon base. (smile)
Sara

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 26, 2011 2:56:29 PM PST
TO: Sara Howard

And good luck to you with your "alligator wrestlin'." (smile)

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 12, 2012 2:34:23 PM PST
Charlie T. says:
No.
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This discussion

Discussion in:  Astronomy forum
Participants:  4
Total posts:  35
Initial post:  Aug 27, 2010
Latest post:  Nov 12, 2012

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