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Looking for a good memoir


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Showing 26-50 of 283 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on Aug 6, 2011 6:07:29 AM PDT
rvtjr says:
Strength Within surviving bythe grace of god

Posted on Aug 6, 2011 2:27:12 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Sep 19, 2011 7:59:44 PM PDT
Two Shadows: The inspirational story of one man's triumph over adversity by Charlie Winger.
Not exactly foster care, but this author & siblings were mostly raised by relatives previously unknown to them after being abandoned by their mother / father unwilling to take them in with his "new" family. Compelling story of his downward spiral, time spent in prison (starting at 18), and how he turned his life around. Fascinating mountain climbing stories as well (in his later years).

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 7, 2011 5:59:09 AM PDT
Hey Everyone,

I've written a memoir that I hope would be worth your while to check out and read .

Game, Set, Life

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 7, 2011 9:56:31 PM PDT
My flight to freedom.

Posted on Aug 8, 2011 5:57:06 AM PDT
Real-I-am says:
In My Mind's Eye, by Justin Marciano

Posted on Aug 9, 2011 2:01:41 PM PDT
Rock My World, A rock & Roll memoir

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 9, 2011 11:02:19 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 9, 2011 11:06:21 PM PDT
To my readers, please check out my memoir. It is a fascinating story. I would love to enjoy feedback how you liked my book. It is about Germany, former EastGermany,how I escaped the Iron wall and my life growing up as a child right after the war. Book "My Flight to Freedom"Thanks so much..

Posted on Aug 10, 2011 3:16:50 AM PDT
Johannah says:
"For A Dancer" by Emma J. Stephens. It's not really about dancing but about life; hers being a rather unconventional one. Full of heart.

Posted on Aug 10, 2011 2:42:22 PM PDT
A much lighter comic memoir is Where the Hell Were Your Parents?. It's a true story about what happens when you let your kids run feral. It takes place in the rural south, and the boys start off by getting arrested 3 times as 10 year olds and it picks up speed from there. I laughed my @#$ off. I found it at www.nathanweathington.com, not sure if it is on amazon yet.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 10, 2011 4:48:44 PM PDT
rrp777 says:
BIPOLAR HOPE -
Manic Episodes and the Dark Side -
a Memoir of a Bipolar Life.

Always focus on a project. Take a course, write a memoir, etc. My attempt at a book is finally in print. The year-long process was the most cathartic and healing experience in my 34 years as a manic depressive.
It has made friends and relatives much more understanding toward me, as well as helping me understand my own life. I am interacting with my loved ones again instead of being ashamed of past episodes and avoiding the reminder of them.
The book itself may be helpful to you or a loved one, and encourage you to write one too. http://www.richard-patton.com

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 10, 2011 7:49:39 PM PDT
Three Little Words by Ashley Rhodes-Courter

Posted on Aug 10, 2011 9:08:33 PM PDT
I just read a funny and just delightful read called A GIRL NAMED ZIPPY by Haven Kimmel. Down to earth and just fun. It's definitely a stand out for me, as well as RUNNING WITH SCISSORS by Augusten Burroughs. Love all of his stuff. Can't think of anything else, but always love Beatle's Bios.

Posted on Aug 15, 2011 11:52:08 PM PDT
Rebone says:
Hello readers
Check out my latest work - a biography of a baby born of mixed gender but raised as a boy. It's called A Woman Denied...The Early Years and it's available bow

Posted on Aug 16, 2011 5:49:26 PM PDT
[Deleted by the author on Aug 16, 2011 5:53:05 PM PDT]

Posted on Aug 16, 2011 5:52:29 PM PDT
The Lost Boy: A Foster Child's Search for the Love of a Family by Dave J. Pelzer

Posted on Aug 16, 2011 9:09:41 PM PDT
Full Quiver says:
'Surprised by Oxford' by Carolyn Weber (new book): a literature professor tracking her unlikely spiritual conversion while a doctoral student at Oxford University.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 16, 2011 11:12:10 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 16, 2011 11:33:34 PM PDT
gilly8 says:
to libertyreader: my all-time favorite memoirs are "Angela's Ashes" by Frank McCourt, a wonderful and moving true story of a large family, abandoned by their father, and growing up in extremely poor Ireland...no foster homes involved but the poverty these kids experienced is far above the poverty of any foster home children of today in the U.S// There is also a sequel, and a book by one of his brothers.
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I also was very moved by Rick Bragg's "Its all over but the shoutin", about growing up very very poor as a white boy in the Deep South. Their mother kept the family together; the dad had left. A touching scene is when a local Black family brings some food to their door....remember the time and place where this occured!
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Another set of autobiographies written by a manic-depressive (better known now as Bipolar) individual, Patti Duke, the actress. First was:
"Call Me Anna: The Autobiography of Patty Duke by Patty Duke" then "Brilliant Madness: Living with Manic Depressive Illness ". She was one of the first to bring out this devastating condition, and make it less of "moral weakness" and more of a true illness that can be made better with medication and well trained therapists.
Duke started out as a very young child actor, was on Broadway night after night acting in the stirring "The Miracle Worker"...then on to the movie of the same name. At some point her mother agreed it would be easier all around to have "Anna" (her real name) go to live with the couple who were her theatrical agents....they of course had already changed her name to "Patti Duke"....So, not only was her name changed, but her entire life. She slept on a coach at the couple's apartment, and as I recall---its been a while since I read the book---they managed to obtain quite a bit of her money during the peak earning years (childhood/ teens). There was also some inappropriate physical touching and so on....but she had no one to tell.
As soon as she became 18 or so, she left the agents abruptly, and---this being the late '60's---became involved in the drug and party lifestyle available to anyone then. She became pregnant with her first child, Sean.....but did not know for sure who his father was. For a long time it seemed his father was Desi Arnez Jr (son of Lucille Ball)....for years this remained unknown (pre-DNA testing). She later married John Austin, a mostly-stage actor, and Sean became Sean Austin (Lord of the Rings---Sam). There were several other children as well. She describes the life on the road of a couple acting in plays, living in trailers with several children, and being up and ready to act in a play nightly....she expresses her guilt over how she raised her children, how hard she was on them, and how often she threw "fits" or "tantrums" over some minor event....eventually she did find help, and most importantly, a diagnosis.
The second book goes on into her life as it was when she wrote the book, much happier, low key, remarried to another man, living in the country....I don't know how her life has turned out know, but I hope she's found some peace.

Posted on Aug 17, 2011 4:50:50 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Dec 8, 2011 5:44:04 AM PST
1923: A Memoir Lies and Testaments 99 cents

Review
It's a personal as well as a social history. Smith has the knack of bringing the times to life in a way that few writers can manage. It's the ability to tell a story, the knowledge of when to move on & not labour a point.
--The Bookbag

1923 is a book that succeeds in two ways with ease, both as a personal memoir of a life lived in a volatile age and as a record of that age for all time. --The Current Reader

1923: A Memoir "Heartbreaking & Uplifting" ***** (5-stars)--Celtic Connections
Product Description
To say that Harry Smith was born under an unlucky star would be an understatement. Born in England in 1923, Smith chronicles the tragic story of his early life in this first volume of his memoirs. He presents his family's early history-their misfortunes and their experiences of enduring betrayal, inhumane poverty, infidelity, and abandonment.
1923: A Memoir presents the story of a life lyrically described, capturing a time both before and during World War II when personal survival was dependent upon luck and guile. During this time, failure insured either a trip to the workhouse or burial in a common grave. Brutally honest, Smith's story plummets to the depths of tragedy and flies up to the summit of mirth and wonder, portraying real people in an uncompromising, unflinching voice.

1923: A Memoir tells of a time and place when life, full of raw emotion, was never so real.

Posted on Aug 17, 2011 2:14:07 PM PDT
I was not a foster child but was brought up in poverty during the Great Depression and World War II. Read my memoir, WHEN BROOKLYN WAS HEAVEN: A Memoir from Brooklyn to L.A. and Places In-Between. In this book you'll laugh, you'll cry, and you will be filled with nostalgia, especially if you are from New York. Go to http://www.amazon.com to find the book and to www.stanlevenson.com to find out about me.

Posted on Aug 17, 2011 2:27:05 PM PDT
I was not a foster child but was brought up in poverty during the Great Depression and World War II. Read my memoir, WHEN BROOKLYN WAS HEAVEN: A Memoir from Brooklyn to L.A. and Places In-Between. In this book you'll laugh, you'll cry, and you will be filled with nostalgia, especially if you are from New York. Go to http://www.amazon.com to find the book and to www.stanlevenson.com to find out about me.

Posted on Aug 18, 2011 10:56:23 AM PDT
Wolfsong says:
I Said "I Will"

A dying woman begs her husband to somehow make sure her grand-babies (age 16 months and 3 months) know who she is. As a result, he writes a book for them. It details the life of their grandma and the love she gave to her family while she was alive. Excellent read.

Posted on Aug 20, 2011 8:50:12 PM PDT
Joyce Bacon says:
If ever a memoir should be turned into a movie...this is it. 'A River of Dreams - A Memoir of a Pathetic Life' by V. J. Brenbecker is the story of one of the saddest lives I have ever read about. And with all this man has been through, he will still make you laugh and will also rip your heart out and make you shed tears. He truly is a pathetic figure that deserves to get his story out to the masses as I am sure it was not easy for him to relive his life while writing this book. You will love it!

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 20, 2011 11:45:52 PM PDT
Mack Mama says:
Tales of an Original Bad Girl by MackMama

Posted on Aug 22, 2011 11:18:18 AM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on Aug 24, 2011 3:04:24 PM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 22, 2011 1:08:50 PM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on Aug 30, 2011 12:01:53 PM PDT]
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Discussion in:  Biography forum
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Initial post:  Jul 1, 2011
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