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please recommend autobiographies about non-celebreties

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Posted on Apr 30, 2012 6:50:37 PM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on Apr 30, 2012 7:52:40 PM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 30, 2012 7:16:23 PM PDT
A book that is a definte must read on my list...

Posted on Apr 30, 2012 11:10:04 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 30, 2012 11:11:03 PM PDT
T. Moore says:
Here are two very different autobiographies probably never discussed together before:

Nuns Story by Kathryn Hulme, the basis for the Audrey Hepburn film of the same name.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Nun's_Story
(Oops, a biography not autobiography but stands the test of time)

Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly is a New York Times bestselling non-fiction book written by American chef Anthony Bourdain. He was not a celebrity at the time, so this fits the description.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kitchen_Confidential

Posted on May 1, 2012 3:55:12 AM PDT
'The Invisible Thread, a journeyy home' by Elizabeth Wallace
Review for The Invisible Thread by Elizabeth Wallace
I `met' Elizabeth on a writer's forum, a site looking for books by unknown authors. After reading a review of her book, I sent for it on Amazon. I intended to put some time aside, to read a book that I thought would be different from most memoirs. When I finally found that time, I wasn't disappointed.
However on first receiving this book, I wasn't sure I was going to like it as it was written `the wrong way round'. Elizabeth, unlike most authors, began her story at the end and not the beginning. How wrong could I be! The first thing that drew me in was a line that read `I met my father when I was forty'. This intrigued me.
I want to say so much about this book but don't want to spoil the story for those who will, I hope, read it.
When life finally allowed me the time to read The Invisible Thread, I immediately liked Elizabeth's style of writing, easy and enjoyable, sometimes even funny. I was amazed at her almost blatant honesty. In her early life, she was a bit of a tearaway for reasons that become clear. She stole, started fires and really didn't seem a very nice child. The picture she paints of young Beth is a child you wouldn't want your children to go around with. But she was, if nothing else, a resourceful little girl.
Sometimes whilst reading her story, I felt I was intruding, that I shouldn't be there and perhaps should stop not read any further. It was her vivid descriptions and open way of talking, that kept drawing me in and eventually I felt I was walking alongside her, holding her hand. There were times I wanted to scream at her, to stop her but all I could do was to read on.
Beth was a fatherless child born to a mother, who herself was not without baggage. Numerous homes, lots of moving around the country would have daunted most children, but not Beth. She was determined to not only to survive but to succeed in many things. She tells her story in an honest, enjoyable and believable manner.
At 13 she decided to take very drastic actions to gain her mother's attention. She played a dangerous game but succeeded in showing her mother, that life was not as safe out in the world as she had possibly believed. I won't say anymore for fear of spoiling this book for others, who in my opinion MUST read it.
The book takes us on a road with many unexpected obstacles and twists and turns, just when we think we know what is happening something else comes along and we are not as sure. Many people may question if this story is a true story, but for personal reasons I know that it is `ordinary' people, who can have extraordinary lives, some sad some happy, but often have a story to tell. This is one of them.
Before I read THE INVISBLE THREAD, lots of things got in my way and I began to look on reading it as a one would look forward to a sumptuous meal. I was not disappointed in the preparation, the presentation, the appearance or the taste. It was indeed a banquet for the mind. Elizabeth showed me danger and intrigue and kept me guessing throughout the story. Ultimately surprising me at the end.

A powerful heart-warming story, beautifully written and lovingly and honestly told. Thank you Elizabeth for taking me on your journey.I felt every emotion with you holding my hand, I felt anger, sadness, frustration and fear but most of all, you made me smile.
I hope many people will read this story and share Beth's journey.

Cassie Harte author I DID TELL I DID.

Posted on May 1, 2012 4:13:28 AM PDT
Every writer begin his journey with love of writing and possibly unaware that journey into the writing is not easy and it is hard as a rock. There aren't many people around that will help out new talented writers and we have to understand that when someone wish to write a story, an article or a book it could back fire, but if there is love for writing than success are also ahead. Elizabeth did intended giving to readers something that she believe is a fact towards her ability to tell the story it doesn't matter which shape she pick up, and one thing is most certain that she had a courage to do so and it is important that we should understand; it is her own work. beginner in writing are like children when they start in preps, but only in grade two they are told when they begin writing their story their golden rules to think are: 'WHO, WHAT, WHERE, WHEN, HOW'. And now after all someone did wake her up, when next time she blot again she will remember her first mistake.

Posted on May 1, 2012 4:29:02 AM PDT
[Deleted by the author on May 1, 2012 4:34:27 AM PDT]

Posted on May 1, 2012 5:07:41 AM PDT
Sorry Raymond, I am a bit confused.What was Elizabeth's 'first mistake'? Her story was an excellent read and I promote it for readers on this site.Please forgive me if I have misunderstood your post.
Cassie

Posted on May 1, 2012 6:22:16 AM PDT
CHsummer says:
I highly recommend "Lily, Duchess of Marlborough" by Sally E. Svenson.. Anyone who loves New York and London Society, the Gilded Age, Winston Churchill and life at an English Manor House or Castle(a la Downton Abbey) will savor this fascinating book. It's the story of an American girl, Lily Price Hamersley, widowed at a very young age, who goes on to marry the 8th Duke of Marlborough, holder of "one of the most elevated titles in Britain". The author has done a thorough and accurate job in presenting Lily's life. The book allowed me to "know" the personal story of Lily and her three marriages. All anecdotes and stories are well documented in the notes and bibliography. Lily learned how to rise above time, place and circumstance to become the heroine of her life. She had courage and many obstacles to overcome. Lily experienced loss and discouragements, and yet persevered to have an extraordinary life. She is an inspiration in strength and adaptability. Sally E. Svenson's excellent story-telling skills distinguish this book from other biographies. The result is a wonderful and enlightening read!

In reply to an earlier post on May 1, 2012 8:27:13 PM PDT
Wasn't the story written `the wrong way round'... or I'm wrong.

In reply to an earlier post on May 1, 2012 9:28:39 PM PDT
T. Taylor says:
Hello Patricia,

Read the Color of Gay by Tridai Taylor

In reply to an earlier post on May 2, 2012 12:47:09 AM PDT
Hi Raymond. I think you may have misunderstood. At first, because Elizabeth began her story, as today, I thought, that to me, it was 'the wrong way round' but it worked. It wasn't a mistake, it was just different. It didn't take anything away from the story which was an excellent easy read. I enjoyed it and will promote it as one of the best books I have read. Hope you will too.
Cassie Harte author I DID TELL I DID

Posted on May 2, 2012 2:19:42 AM PDT
Though the Heavens Fall by Mikhail Kulakov, an inspiring autobiography about a man imprisoned by Stalin for his faith in Soviet Russia.

Posted on May 2, 2012 9:38:37 AM PDT
...but they call me Sonny Easy read and true story,

Posted on May 2, 2012 6:03:53 PM PDT
John says:
A Sea Story: The Untold Story of the U.S. Navy Response to 9/11.

In reply to an earlier post on May 2, 2012 9:59:42 PM PDT
I found this post as I read through what I think are posts concerning or inspired by the book "INSPIRED" by Mccrary. whoever mentioned they would like to know about inspirational books about or by average people, let me say how happy I felt that I found someone so quickly that was thinking the exact same thing as me.. This I thought without having even read the book yet. I only noticed that all the people mentioned were found in less than average circumstances now.. I don't know how others feel about that but as for me it diminishes somewhat what they have to say on the subject. I tend to think that they may have forgotten the desperation that comes from an ordinary life with no safeguards or contacts to fish you out of the simplest of situations.. I will speak of this at my church next Sunday for sure..thank you...

Posted on May 2, 2012 10:03:52 PM PDT
I found this post as I read through what I think are posts concerning or inspired by the book "INSPIRED" by Mccrary. whoever mentioned they would like to know about inspirational books about or by average people instead of the rich and famous thrilled my heart as it was precisely what came to my mind as I glanced through the book bio, but let me say how happy I felt that I found someone so quickly that was thinking the exact same thing as me.. This I thought without having even read the book yet. I only noticed that all the people mentioned were found in less than average circumstances now.. I don't know how others feel about that but as for me it diminishes somewhat what they have to say on the subject. I tend to think that they may have forgotten the desperation that comes from an ordinary life with no safeguards or contacts to fish you out of the simplest of situations.. I will speak of this at my church next Sunday for sure..thank you...

In reply to an earlier post on May 2, 2012 10:13:11 PM PDT
My book, Missing the Big Picture, is my autobiography. It is about how I grew up with my mentally ill grandmother, was a victim of bullying, contemplated suicide, and turned things around to start doing stand-up comedy. The link is Missing the Big Picture (Volume 1)

In reply to an earlier post on May 2, 2012 10:14:55 PM PDT
Hi Pam, my autobiography, Missing the Big Picture, deals with how I grew up living with my mentally ill grandmother, was a victim of bullying, suffered from my own mental illness, and turned things around to start doing stand up comedy. Missing the Big Picture (Volume 1)

Posted on May 2, 2012 11:59:05 PM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on May 29, 2012 2:11:52 PM PDT]

Posted on May 3, 2012 1:19:16 AM PDT
lozan365 says:
One Life to Live

"One Life to Live" by Alexander Crombie Cordiner

This is the story of an ordinary young man from an ordinary family in the North East of Scotland. Like other young men of his generation, Crombie was called up at 18 to join the Army in World War II. He soon found himself in a world totally different from that of his happy childhood in Aberdeenshire. He served with the 9th Battalion Royal Tank Regiment, landed in Normandy a short time after the Normandy landings, moved with his regiment across France, Belgium and the Netherlands, liberating the town of Roosendaal, and served in Germany at the end of the war.

"One Life to Live" is Crombie's full account of his wartime experiences, other memoirs are "The Last Act: March - December 1945", "A Tale of Five Lads", and "Memories of a Nobody".

In reply to an earlier post on May 3, 2012 2:10:57 AM PDT
Hi Jamie.Some of the most tragic, most beautiful and most sincere and inspirational books are written by ordinary people and you will find them on this page. I am not sure what you mean by 'found in less than average circumstances now'. I wrote my story to inspire others and to enlighten some who haven't had bad lives and I don't think of my circumstances now as 'less than average'. I work with people who have suffered in all kinds of ways, I work with survivors of abuse, bullying, neglect. People suffering anxiety, depression, PTSD and my own life has helped me become the person I am today. I felt I should write particularly to assure you, that even though we, as survivors and authors, move on with our lives we have never 'forgotten the desperation that comes from an ordinary life with no safeguards or contacts to fish us out of the simplest situations'. I can only speak for me, but God wasn't listening when I was a child even when I asked him for help many many times. I hope, in your 'congregation' on Sunday, you have 'ordinary people' with a story to tell, who will agree with me. There are many stories on her that I could recommend, including THE INVISIBLE THREAD by Elizabeth Wallace and my own story I DID TELL I DID, maybe you could read them and let us know if you feel we have the right to speak on the subject that we write about. Hurt, pain, neglect, abuse etc. Thank you for reading this
Cassie Harte Author

In reply to an earlier post on May 3, 2012 9:54:52 AM PDT
Please look at my website-Jill Schaefer,
http://home.earthlink.net/~schaefer234 to view my two books:-

'Up The Wooden Hill' -a historical memoir about the author growing up in London's Blitz and her husband in Nazi Germany before, during and after World War II, featuring two tales seen through different spectacles. Stories of love and war, tears and laughter, families, friends and foes. From school days fraught with sibling rivalry and controversies with parents, lives are rebuilt, the Deutsche mark revalued and a father de-nazified. Both the young people mentioned in the book learn apprenticeships, experience calf love and the beginning of a postwar world.

Video: http://www.eopinion.us/videos/71/up-the-wooden-hill

AND

Jill Schaefer's "Coming of Age in California -English Style-" is a lighthearted account of the author's true story of herself, a naive English teen, fresh from home and convent school, venturing forth with a girlfriend to the California of the 1950s. The duo travel from Southampton, England on the Queen Mary to New York City, cross-country by Greyhound bus via Route 66 to a welcome in Pasadena. The two girls first visit California's small town of Bakersfield, then on to Hollywood with an involvement in a call-girl ring. The journey continues to Long Beach and a job with the Miss Universe Pageant, and finally to San Francisco, city of sophistication and singles bars. Along the way they encounter climate, communication, customs, and cultural challenges...and a disintegrating friendship.

video: http://www.eopinion.us/videos/44/coming-of-age-in-california-english-style

Posted on May 3, 2012 10:06:43 AM PDT
@Julia. Sounds interesting. I'll have to look into this. My father was a POW in WWII Germany. Thanks
POW #74324

In reply to an earlier post on May 3, 2012 11:41:43 AM PDT
Tom Harvey says:
Hi Patricia:

Please consider my just-released memoir, "The Eighties: A Bitchen Time To Be a Teenager!" now available on Amazon, soon-to-be-available in Kindle format.

Thank you!

Tom Harvey
AuthorTomHarvey.com

In reply to an earlier post on May 3, 2012 2:25:58 PM PDT
Hello Patricia Amis,
My name is Malikka Porter and I have 2 volumes of my autobiography published and I too am in the process of working with a great producer, that I will keep nameless at this time, but have a horrific life after waking from a coma and loosing all of my past memory and functions. You can go to my website MPORTER-PA.VPWEB.COM and read the page about us; also leave your complete contact info and when I have a booksigning in you state I will have a surprise celebrity guest and will give you complimentary passes, also sign my guestbook and take a look at some celebrities that my story have blessed me to befriend. I will support you also and purchase your book. I too like to know how regular society lives and that I`m not the only one with a story. God Bless fellow author and pray for all and any fortune to come to you now.
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Discussion in:  Meet Our Authors forum
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Initial post:  Apr 22, 2011
Latest post:  Nov 17, 2012

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