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Is Blu-ray being beat out by it's predecessor?


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Showing 1-25 of 47 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Jan 16, 2013 3:15:52 PM PST
Jack Pacini says:
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Posted on Jan 16, 2013 3:52:54 PM PST
Walmart is a discount store. Your theory is like saying "I went to Long John Silver and there aren't any lobster dishes there any more. Lobster must be going out of business." Your other flaw is your data sampling. One store does not an industry trend make.

Posted on Jan 16, 2013 5:17:19 PM PST
IlliniGuy08 says:
Couldn't have said it better, C. Barbus.

Posted on Jan 16, 2013 11:47:33 PM PST
Zhimbo says:
There's simply no reason for 4K for home use, not until very large projector screens are common in households. Not happening any time soon.

If anything, Blu-ray will be beat by online streaming, not DVDs.

Posted on Jan 17, 2013 4:23:32 AM PST
MikeT says:
There were lots of VHS movies "on sale" when DVD really started catching on. Still see many VHS movies being sold?

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 17, 2013 5:25:59 PM PST
Jack Pacini says:
Not saying Walmart is the definitive end all of the industry. It just strikes me as odd that they would give real estate once dedicated to the new kid on the block to the kid that is supposed to be moving out. At the very least, where were the Blu-rays that used to be there? They weren't moved, they were just gone, and replaced by 10+ year old movies on DVD. I mean shouldn't Walmart be pushing the current tech more than the obsolete tech?

Posted on Jan 17, 2013 7:32:54 PM PST
A. Cook says:
I could see Best Buy pushing new tech. Walmart is interested in selling things cheap... and DVDs are cheap. Besides, You also have to consider Walmart's target Demographic.... Poor? Redneck? Cheap?

What ever the case, their targeted demographic may not be buying Blurays... at least in that location. Personally, I shop at walmart as they really do usually have better prices; but I no longer purchase DVDs. No Point.... and streaming can't compare to 1080P or 4k. Especially with ISP companies now implementing data caps as well as throttling speeds... Streaming is going no where unless it comes from the ISP.

Posted on Jan 17, 2013 9:31:12 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 17, 2013 9:31:47 PM PST
turkish says:
there is no reason for blu ray to die off, or lose it to DVD. today a blu ray disc is almost exactly the same price as DVD's and blu ray players are as cheap as 35 bucks. Dark knight rises was 17.99 on blu ray and 15.99 on DVD when it came out. the gap is really small, if anything, Blu ray is most likely gaining more and more of the market over DVD. I personally havent purchased a DVD for 3 years now. it just doesnt make any sense to do so.

Posted on Jan 17, 2013 9:48:58 PM PST
Charlie says:
I agree with turkish, allthough DVD is still the highest selling format, blu-ray continues to climb. People who don't care to rush out and upgrade their equipment will some day need a new television, DVD players and standard definition televisions are no longer produced, maybe it won't be too long before DVD's aren't either. I recently read in an online forum where somebody was looking to find out if Avatar is available on VHS.

Posted on Jan 18, 2013 1:46:34 AM PST
C. Klingbeil says:
You are correct, Charlie.

Something for everyone to chew on: 8 track tapes, cassette tapes, and vinyl records are now collectables. Example: When I bought my first DVD player, it cost almost $650, with less than 50 titles available. Now they can be purchased for under $20. My first 540 Mb hard drive cost $500; and I just bought a 1.5 Tb external drive for under $80. Try and find a CRT TV these days...

I held out on BD until the HD-DVD/Blu-Ray war was finished. When it was, I saw prices start to drop rapidly, and they should continue as more people make the conversion. I purchased my first (and still own) BD player for $88. Plus, as popularity grows, more older films are re-mastered into HD (eg 'Mad Max' and 'The Road Warrior' look great on BD), and as such prices drop to market levels. DVD's will not suddenly disappear, they will just just fade way like the cassette tape. And eventually, if the 4k technology becomes affordable to the average consumer, we may see BD fade. But that will be many years to come.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 18, 2013 6:52:12 AM PST
bfore13 says:
"I mean shouldn't Walmart be pushing the current tech more than the obsolete tech?"

No, that's not what I'd expect from Walmart. They sell stuff cheap and have an inventory of old DVDs. I don't see anything out of the ordinary here.

Posted on Jan 18, 2013 9:01:13 AM PST
Cavaradossi says:
DVDs are hardly obsolete! It's still the dominant format.

Posted on Jan 18, 2013 9:35:56 AM PST
J. Kibuule says:
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Posted on Jan 18, 2013 11:39:46 AM PST
A M says:
"Who on earth still buys those"

Wow, you really are in your own bubble. People who still buy them are... those who don't have HDTV, can't afford HDTV, have one, but haven't gotten a Blu Ray player yet. college students who don't own a TV and mostly watch movies on their computer/laptop. People who are not technically inclined (like my brother) and don't really care. People who buy movies to keep their kids occupied and would rather spend a few less dollars since their kids aren't really going to care about the difference in picture or sound quality.

Posted on Jan 18, 2013 3:06:38 PM PST
Cavaradossi says:
A M

I would duck, if I were you. The Blu-ray forum is often not a friendly place to those who post good common sense answers.

Posted on Jan 18, 2013 3:20:19 PM PST
Foxy says:
I was at Best Buy today and I was very surprised to see DVD's mixed in with BDs. This is five years after BD won the format war over HD DVD.I purchase about 95% BD vs 5% DVD but after five years shouldn't BD be the dominant format over DVD?

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 18, 2013 3:35:39 PM PST
Jack Pacini says:
I still buy the majority of the media I buy on DVD, because frankly much of what I actually watch isn't available on Blu. Most older TV shows and anime wont ever see a BD release. That is where I believe DVD will continue to thrive.

For example; Three's Company will (likely) never get a BD release. Honestly does a series from the late 70s & early 80s need a HD release? There is not a whole lot that could be done to improve the picture or sound quality over the DVD set I already have. Plus there isn't a huge market for it on BD, as fans of the show most likely already own it on DVD. Double dipping an 8 season show would be truly throwing away a lot of money. Unless all 8 seasons came in a $40-$50 Blu-ray set, it would be very expensive and unnecessary to buy the individual seasons. Especially considering that the quality improvement would be negligible.

I believe DVD will be here to stay for quite a while, even after everybody on Earth has a BD player.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 18, 2013 3:39:01 PM PST
Jack Pacini says:
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Posted on Jan 18, 2013 3:46:02 PM PST
Dantes says:
All of the Wal-Marts I have been to don't have a great blu-ray selection, if you can even call it that. I rarely buy blu-ray movies there. Best Buy though more of a selection has just been a cluttered mess recently by throwing DVD and blu-rays all together just makes it all that more difficult to find what I am looking for. I avoid them too when I can. But as everyone has stated, blu-ray is not going away.

Posted on Jan 19, 2013 1:11:59 AM PST
Charlie says:
Some DVD players were a DVD/VHS combo, but all blu-ray players will play DVDs, making the format a survivor.

Posted on Jan 19, 2013 5:28:21 AM PST
Jersey Girl says:
Jack...I too have noticed this at my Walmart. Just when I am hoping they will add MORE blurays,they take half of them away and put dvds there. My Walmart has three $5 dvd bins. A spanish movie dvd bin,a four sided dvd display and two entire isles of dvds. The average person isn't going to convert to bluray if they feel that their movie buying options are limited. I buy almost all of my blurays from Amazon,but everyone I know buys theirs from Walmart or pawn shops. They buy dvds. I don't know anyone who buys blurays except for me. I wouldn't call Walmart the definitive of what is tech savvy,but they get the new Ipads,Ipods and gaming consoles when they come out. Stands to reason that they should try and push bluray a little bit more.

Posted on Jan 19, 2013 5:54:16 AM PST
Cavaradossi says:
Maybe Walmart customers are buying their BDs online instead of paying higher prices for them in stores. Isn't that what most of us are doing? Besides, where is it written in stone that Walmart customers can't also be savvy shoppers?

(The only thing I ever purchased from a Walmart ((and the only time I've ever been in one)) was my first HD DVD player.)

Posted on Jan 19, 2013 6:32:17 AM PST
Fred says:
BD is better when the transfers are good... some DVDs look better upscaled over a bad transfer or source material. Also unlike VHS which was a highly perishable format... tape getting erased, eaten in the machine etc, DVD last basically forever as long as it's handled with care. The more people that buy HDTVs or 3DTVs the more Blu-ray market will grow. It's sickening the way Microsoft has bribed the movie studios early on to back HD DVD, throwing a huge stumbling block in the way of BD and 3D entertainment... dumbing movie and gaming entertainment down simultaneously.

Posted on Jan 19, 2013 9:14:07 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 19, 2013 9:17:21 AM PST
EdM says:
DVDs - the physical disk production cost - are MUCH cheaper than BDs. Thus, really cheap places like Walmart might well be expected to fail as a fair sample for BD sales, compared to overall, combined sales. There is a fierce battle for consumer discretionary $$$, and streaming is making inroads. Accurate and complete data is not easy to find, as various sources have an interest in the outcome. Still, various sources show interesting things.

This, from a streaming favorable source and from August, 2012, makes no distinction between DVDs and BDs as opposed to streaming:

http://www.streamingmedia.com/Articles/Editorial/Featured-Articles/Studios-Push-Blu-Ray-for-the-Holidays-but-Discs-Time-Is-Ending-84621.aspx

"The major studios are making a concerted effort to sell classic movies on Blu-ray, but streaming is rapidly taking over from optical discs."

This streaming _takeover_ conclusion seems somewhat biased, to say the least. Yet, streaming is a growing consumption method for movie and TV content, especially when free as some TV show reruns are, e.g. Next, from about the same time:

http://blog.cdrom2go.com/2012/08/blu-ray-discs-still-growing/

"Despite the popularity of online content streaming giants, like Netflix, and potential upstarters, like UltraViolet, some consumers still prefer physical discs to digital content when it comes to enjoying movies and television series. The preference is substantiated by the fact that Blu-ray disc sales from the first half of the year increased 13% compared to last year's first half figures ...

"Blu-ray Replaces DVD
"As a result, Blu-rays are now the new standard in home entertainment, robbing the DVD format of its previous spot. Blu-ray's dominance also contributes to the rising number of homes equipped with Blu-ray compatible electronic devices."

It would seem fairer to report that BDs are the standard in high definition home entertainment, as DVDs are NOT high definition. See also:

http://www.homemediamagazine.com/blu-ray-disc/centris-blu-ray-player-household-penetration-reaches-26-26721

"About one in four homes had a Blu-ray Disc player or capable consumer electronic device in the fourth quarter of 2011, up 47% from the same period in 2010, according to new research."

This next source seems to have some reliability, although it is not easy to come up with cumulative numbers. Still, looking at the latest post:

http://forum.digital-digest.com/f145/nielsen-videoscan-home-media-magazine-blu-ray-dvd-hd-dvd-stats-updated-weekly-86912-30.html#post592951

"For the week ending 5th January 2013, here are the stats:'

"Blu-ray Share:
"Looper managed to have a Blu-ray sales share of just over 50%, at 50.28% to be exact, meaning the Blu-ray and combo versions outsold the DVD only editions, albeit only by a small margin...

"Year on Year Comparison ...
"Blu-ray sales increased by $7.55m (up 24.4%), while DVD sales decreased by $0.1m (down 0.1%) ...
"Blu-ray's market share grew, from 22.83% to 26.92%."

It really requires longer periods of data for the effect of anomalies to be smoothed out. Thus, this year on year data clearly shows that DVD is declining, while BD is growing. OTOH, despite poor quality of streamed content, ease of access and [some] economy by inclusion in cable plans is helping the growth of online - streamed and downloaded - consumption.

Going back through the weekly posts in this nielsen-videoscan blog is interesting, with the weekly variations on sales results, yet it is very clear that the answer to the subject or initial question of "Is Blu-ray being beat out by it's predecessor?" is NO. DVD sales are clearly declining, while BD sales are growing. Undoubtedly, in time, BD will truly be the king of optical disc sales, if it is not already, in some sense.

OTOH, the future of streaming and online distribution, while clearly growing at this time, seems somewhat murky because the cost for high bandwidth "speed" remains very high and there is limited radio spectrum available, especially for smart phone type devices that consume video content "on the road".

Posted on Jan 19, 2013 9:25:10 AM PST
Cavaradossi says:
EdM

"Blu-ray's market share grew......to 26.92%."

Blu-ray's market share, I presume, refers to optical discs. If so, it sounds like DVD still sells 73% percent of optical discs. That makes it sound like BD still has a way to go to become the dominant format.

Now, if market share, refers to purchased video content, that would include streaming. Do you know how "market share" is defined in these studies?
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Discussion in:  Blu-ray forum
Participants:  26
Total posts:  47
Initial post:  Jan 16, 2013
Latest post:  Jan 28, 2013

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