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After blu-ray, what comes next?


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Posted on Oct 21, 2012 4:34:31 PM PDT
Cavaradossi says:
Otter0911

Memphis Belle is only on a non-anamorphic DVD? Yikes! I'll stick with my laserdisc.

I'll have to take your word for it that the others you mentioned look better on streaming. It just hasn't been my experience. But even if streaming looks and sounds fantastic, it would still bother me that what I'm seeing isn't mine.

I know that most of what I see on TV isn't mine, but if it's something I want to own, I'm just not going to be satisfied with just watching it streamed on the HDTV.

BTW, congratulations on your collection. You can certainly speak to this subject since you experience both sides.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 22, 2012 6:31:47 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 22, 2012 6:32:44 AM PDT
Nat Whilk says:
In my neighbourhood, AM, which that "u" betrays is on the other side of the Atlantic, people in cinemas don't need to buy popcorn - they're generally bombarded with it by the teenagers in the rows behind. And the petrol (sorry, gas) and parking costs of a car trip to the flicks would be a lot more than $5! Joking apart, I get the impression that once a Brit has got a reasonably good theater kit at home, he often never sets foot in a cinema again. And if he's a friendly guy, his home gradually turns into the favourite cinema of his chums! Multiplexes here are so geared to the young that older people visiting them tend to feel like aliens.

Posted on Oct 22, 2012 7:03:17 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 22, 2012 7:04:32 AM PDT
Cavaradossi says:
Nat Whilk

You are also describing loads of home theater enthusiasts here in the U.S. Since I got into home theater over thirty years ago, I have seldom visited a theater, and certainly not since I bought a projector and an LCD HDTV, along with Laserdiscs, DVDs, HD DVDs, and BDs. A large component system provides the sound. As a result, I'm blissfully free of sticky floors, constant cellphone talkers, flying popcorn, and amorous teenagers all around me, not to mention the occasional crying infant, none of whom ever seem to be removed from the room by a parent.

Posted on Oct 22, 2012 7:37:41 AM PDT
stevign says:
[After blu-ray, what comes next?]

Death and the Afterlife?

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 22, 2012 5:37:43 PM PDT
"And how much is the bus fare to the Best Buy or Walmart where you buy your discs?"

Hint: This is Amazon.com...

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 22, 2012 8:26:19 PM PDT
LOL, what? You can't just make a broad statemtn like "most people are not that materialistic" in a culture built on materialism and consumerism and expect people to take it seriously? I mean you can, but it's not advisable lol

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 22, 2012 8:29:02 PM PDT
true but lets not forget its also that attitude that had people in the 80's realistically thinking somewhere in the 21st century we would have flying cars and other things that never came to be

There is always an initial boom and then typically simply a refining of those concepts, Cars have made great strides but since the 70's/80's the only real difference has been in fine tuning and adding computer chips that make it nearly impossible to completely work on your own vehicle

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 22, 2012 8:32:12 PM PDT
Just because we don't care doesn't mean we don't understand, lol, it's an Amazon forum, people type to get their thoughts out not to create a coherent literary work.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 22, 2012 8:34:57 PM PDT
general trend of most people is to buy movies they really like and rent others only because the costs are so high, but in comparison most people listen to the radio rather than buy a CD, they only buy the CD if they really like the song so the analogy might work for you personally but I think its problematic to generalize it past the group you would belong in, which may place music above films

In my group I know many people who watch the same movies over and over for the same reason yours would listen to the same music over and over, it creates an emotional experience of some kind for them and they enjoy reliving that

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 22, 2012 9:48:47 PM PDT
Then their thoughts should be made understandable, since they're so important to the writer. There, done!

It's a wonder in this forum, how its participants don't care anymore about being understood. It's only fourth grade English skills I am remarking about, gee willikers.

Posted on Oct 22, 2012 11:23:17 PM PDT
Georgedc says:
❤4K + OLED + No Glasses 3D + 100"❤

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 23, 2012 5:22:47 AM PDT
stevign says:
re: "Multiplexes here are so geared to the young that older people visiting them tend to feel like aliens."

Yep, they're pretty bad here in America as well. And the worse thing is, some of the screens are not much bigger than what you find in a fancy sports bar. Here are some of my movie-going tips:

1) Go during the week when the kids are in school.

2) Never go to a movie during its 1st week. Call the theater manager (only the manager) during the 2nd week and find out how much longer they will be keeping the movie and if they plan on moving it to a smaller screen, when?

3) Go to the earliest matinée (that's usually around noon). It's cheaper and will have less people. I use these methods and find that I'm usually only one of maybe 2 or three other people in the entire theater; it's like a private showing, I love it.

* Of course no system is perfect, so for those times when you do find kids and/or adults who like to talk during a movie, a pellet gun is mighty handy.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 23, 2012 5:42:53 AM PDT
stevign says:
re: "culture built on materialism and consumerism"

Not to get too picky but that's a pretty broad statement in itself. America was built on freedom, not materialism. And to be fair (and accurate), people of "all" cultures are consumers and will try to pad their nest as nice as they can. Of course some countries are more advanced and economically better off than others, so they can afford to pad their nests with luxuries like boats, TVs, stereos, etc. Nothin' wrong with that though.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 23, 2012 5:44:42 AM PDT
stevign says:
re: "that make it nearly impossible to completely work on your own vehicle"

So sad, so true.

Posted on Oct 23, 2012 10:44:48 AM PDT
Green Meanie says:
4D Theatres are coming soon to your neighborhood. They have been very successful in Mexico, Canada, Europe & Asia. The 3D Movie plus Flight Simulator type seats plus physical elements like water sprays at you, wind, heat, aromas ( like smell-o-vision but automatically released by a computer program ) during key moments during the film.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 23, 2012 11:00:53 AM PDT
All 3D theaters are already 4D, shortie.

length x width x depth x time.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 23, 2012 11:52:57 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 23, 2012 11:53:29 AM PDT
stevign says:
"In 3D, we see things on our retina as a 2D picture. In 2D, things would be seen as a 1D "line", in 1D you would see things as a 0D point, and in 0D you would see nothing at all. A "creature" living in 4D would see things as a 3D "image" and would see "inside" and "around" everything 3D at once (just like you can see "inside" a 2D house or see inside of a 2D square-person)." ~ KAC

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 23, 2012 1:14:05 PM PDT
A M says:
"Here are some of my movie-going tips:"

Those are tips for people like you and Jonathan A. Chang who don't like other people. I remember seeing X2: X-Men United on opening night at the Westwood Village with a thousand comic book fan boys and their energy and excitement was palpable and made the experience more fun. I saw The Avengers in the Bruin (across the street) on a weekday matinee that was mostly empty, and it wasn't as fun. For me, I like the communal experience. I like getting out of the house and interacting with the outside world.

Also, on this board I hear people complain constantly about kids throwing popcorn, talking, texting, etc. during movies. Maybe it is because I live in Los Angeles, or maybe I am able to focus and tune it out, but I don't notice any of that when I am at the movies. The occasional whisper or murmur, but nothing egregious.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 23, 2012 1:17:03 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 23, 2012 2:05:14 PM PDT
A M says:
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Posted on Oct 23, 2012 1:24:41 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 23, 2012 2:27:35 PM PDT
Which was my point, in Hollywood I can see why you'd be too busy to watch films, in more rural areas where there is much less to occupy yourself with and life admittedly moves slower watching films again and again is a welcome (and mostly affordable when you pay once and can watch unlimited times) escape. Example: Inception came out only a few years ago and I've seen it probably twenty times, that may sound sad to some but I'll get home from a difficult shift or long day and put it on while I relax or while I clean or when I've got homework to go over during my school term I'll put it on (or other films) in the background so when I start to lag I can look up and have an immediate mental breAk.

And to clarify I spend plenty of time outside and with friends (me and my friends watch the same films over and over too, such as Goodfellas or T2) but sometimes we don't have money to go out to activities and during six months of the year it's freezing outside where I'm at so good luck going for a fun bike ride in the snow or going for an enjoyable jog

Another film I've watched many times is Social Network. Watching social network when brainstorming for my essays always helps me get an a+ because the dialogue is so well written (which I'm aware is not even near likely a cause and effect relationship but it helps me all the same)

To further my point, these films aren't the exceptions to the rule, I (and most people I know in my smaller town) have favorite films that we'll watch at least once a year (film lovers such as myself will watch them even more than that as I've said)

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 23, 2012 1:49:38 PM PDT
stevign says:
re: "Those are tips for people like you and Jonathan A. Chang who don't like other people"

What a ludicrous conclusion. I'm a very gregarious person, always have been. I just happen to like disappearing into a film when I go and other people are sometimes too much of a distraction. Besides, sitting in a theater alone, or almost alone, you have the pick of the seats. When possible I go with a friend but they're like me and don't like to talk while enjoying a movie either.

re: "I like getting out of the house and interacting with the outside world."

Well isn't that nice, so do I.

Posted on Oct 23, 2012 2:02:01 PM PDT
"I like getting out of the house and interacting with the outside world."

That sounds scary. My therapist thinks I can progress to that point by 2014. Thank goodness she does housecalls.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 23, 2012 2:23:21 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 23, 2012 2:24:58 PM PDT
First off, I will say you will probably disagree with my correction of your argument against my initial point. It just seems highly likely since we are both speaking from our own subjective viewpoints, from very different lives, and will thus focus on (perhaps) the opposite part of what the other considers important, but nevertheless I will try to explain why your counterpoint to my counterpoint is void (if you understand my original point properly)

You said (SORRY I NOW SEE A M SAID, NOT YOU, BUT THIS ARGUMENT STILL HOLDS) "most people are not that materialistic", that is a QUANTITATIVE statement. You can't make a quantitative statement of any kind from a subjective point of view AND EXPECT people to take it seriously. You have every right to make that statement but unless you can provide some sort of numbers, a quantitative statement based on your subjective opinion only holds true for your subjective world (and may hold up in the objective world surrounding you, which is where you perhaps got the notion from, but it is incredibly unlikely that it applies to the objective world of the entire country)

NOW, my statement "Culture built on materialism and consumerism" is a QUALITATIVE statement. I am speaking not about a percentage or any sort of amount, I am just stating that unquestionably materialism and consumerism are at the foundations of modern culture. It is a quality of modern culture that it has been built on consumerism and materialism, but I cannot say and never did say quantitatively how much of modern culture is built on consumerism and materialism.

See the difference?

Your response is further removed from my point because you started making statements about America as a country, which I never referred to. You seem to have focused on the word culture and taken it to mean the United States as a country, which is not what I was saying at all. Saying qualitatively that "CULTURE was built on materialism and consumerism" is not the same as saying QUANTITATIVELY (or even qualitatively) that the COUNTRY was founded on ideals of materialism and consumerism. I agree the country was founded on ideals of freedom, etc. (Or at the very least that it was the founding fathers intention as made evident by the constitution).
But CULTURE is an ongoing and constantly changing state comprised of many things including our collective institutions, beliefs, attitudes etc. The modern culture in North America (and yes as you say many other places, but that is besides the point) has been founded (to some degree, but I'll avoid quantification altogether here so you don't feel I'm a hypocrite) on materialism and consumerism. Materialism and consumerism are qualities found in modern culture. I don't know how many people would bother to argue that?

You arguing about what the United States was founded avoids my point altogether because I am not referring to the country but its current culture, which are two different things. Furthermore, to drive the point, I only made a qualitative remark while you made a quantitative one. (Though I admit there was obviously a degree of quantification in my remark as I was alluding to consumerism and materialism being a larger part of modern culture, but look around at all the advertisements, designer products and branding to at least see correlative proof).

IF STEVIGN DOESN'T SEE MY POINT BUT SOMEONE ELSE DOES PLEASE LET ME KNOW

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 23, 2012 2:27:37 PM PDT
stevign says:
re: "Thank goodness she does housecalls."

http://media.weirdworm.com/img/misc/5-celebrities-you-didnt-know-were-badass-soldiers/ruth.jpg

((shudder)).............

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 23, 2012 2:36:38 PM PDT
stevign says:
Thanks for the clarification but you could have skipped the 6-paragraph rebuttal and just said you were "alluding to consumerism and materialism being a larger part of modern culture".
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Discussion in:  Blu-ray forum
Participants:  59
Total posts:  255
Initial post:  Oct 8, 2012
Latest post:  Nov 2, 2013

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