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After blu-ray, what comes next?


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Showing 1-25 of 255 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on Nov 2, 2013 10:17:25 PM PDT
Piano4all says:
Totally agree.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 2, 2013 10:16:31 PM PDT
Piano4all says:
It is not materialistic to want something to hold. How would you like a virtual baby when you have kids?

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 2, 2013 4:28:05 AM PDT
ACW says:
Netflix already testing 4k streaming in 2014. Decades? Agree, no way... more like next year. http://www.slashgear.com/netflix-begins-testing-4k-video-with-goal-of-2014-launch-01303901/

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 31, 2013 10:33:30 PM PDT
It's true.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 10, 2013 11:32:44 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 10, 2013 11:34:38 AM PDT
Otter0911 says:
Why? It's not like at the end of the format war they sent out a code that disabled the players or discs! They still work...I have replaced titles with BDs that had a upgrade in Audio or better PQ. Depends on the title...some are better on BD some on HD-DVD. Most of my physical media is just back up. Soon as I get a movie I rip it to my media players/NAS.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 10, 2013 5:23:59 AM PDT
Walking Tall says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Oct 9, 2013 12:25:32 PM PDT
Lol.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 8, 2013 8:57:27 AM PDT
FredColo says:
Thanks for the information. I won't think blue ray is so expensive anymore. I still
have bought several new blue rays on old movies (45-70) years on sale for $4.99.
I still buy DVD when they are in good condition and a movie I want, even slightly.
I have bought many used DVD's for $1-2 dollars at pawn shops.
I don't know how long I will continue to keep Satellite at ~$85/month.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 8, 2013 8:00:39 AM PDT
I heard this same argument when dvd started. There are places on this planet, yes, even in the United States, where streaming is not happening yet. They will still need a physical item to use.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 16, 2013 4:58:00 PM PDT
EdM says:
"Horrifically expensive, can you put a price tag on it?"

In a ballpark sense, it is in the millions of dollars. It depends in part on when the restorations were done, how old the "originals" are and the shape of the original elements. Computing power becomes less expensive over time, but labor to hand correct each frame of old film is very expensive. Consider this from "olden times" in remastering:

http://www.macnn.com/articles/06/06/12/macs.remaster.james.bond/

"600 PM G5 Macs remaster James Bond"

600 PowerMacs at roughly $5000 each in a custom parallel processing unix setup is around $3,000,000 for the Macs alone, without regard for the labor and software to not only recreate each frame [~24 frames per second of film times the time length of the film] of video, but also to process the audio from the best resources still available, possibly constructing a multi-track audio track from perhaps stereo originals. So, it is much more than just cleaning stray dust, dirt and hair specs, restoring the original color and overcoming film degradation defects for the complete package.

Make your own estimation for the cost.

Some films are fairly modern and in decent shape, while old film masters may be on poorly stored nitrate original negatives and mostly unreadable, so other near original sources must be found and treated for best modern master results. Obviously, computing power and software improvements continue with time, but older film materials continue to deteriorate with passing time.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 16, 2013 7:58:24 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 16, 2013 8:04:11 AM PDT
FredColo says:
"mathew J" and"I Have No Name"

What is Horrifically expensive, can you put a price tag on it?

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 16, 2013 6:30:42 AM PDT
Ev says:
For the people who only watch it once, they are not being forced to buy the movie, they can get it via streaming or redbox... But most people purchasing the movie, such as myself, need the the discs in their cases, so our movie collections can grow on our shelves... The point is that for the people who want to BUY the films, home media (discs) are what most of us want.. I don't see why discs and streaming can't both be used; if you want the disc, you can get the disc, if you want to stream, you can stream. Good point about the music tho.

Posted on Aug 13, 2013 9:05:33 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 13, 2013 10:51:51 AM PDT
John Doe says:
2160p (4K) is next & some version of BD (blu-ray disc) should handle that. The current BD tech can be further improved and will stick around for some time considering it is HD and it's growing market share. 3D is a gimmicky fad I wont pay for, ever. I also question it's safety in regards to it's effect to a person's eyes & brain after long term viewing.

As far as the media is concerned I used to think that HVD (holographic versatile disc) would be next, but I like the idea of using either SD cards or USB 3 (or something similar via HDMI port maybe) flash based tech. for both films & music (existing as high def. digital files).

I had wished BDs would replace CDs for music b/c the potential there would be amazing, but sadly it seems most are happy with the ok quality of streaming and lossy aac/mp3 tracks via their smart phones. I'm one not in favor of streaming as there are real bandwidth issues nor saving/copying films to hard drives as the size/space needed for video is tremendous.

One last thing sorta related - I wish the film industry, unions, directors, TV & movie studios could agree on 1 standard for aspect ratio so the movies/TV shows we buy would fill the entire screen so we could say bye to the annoying black bars for good.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 12, 2013 9:32:36 AM PDT
EdM says:
"What would improve our enjoyment would be an improvement of the current picture (eg contrast ratio, color depth) rather than more resolution. No point increasing the size if the fundamentals are still so wrong."

This is so wrong. By making an all-encoompasing group, it implies that all LCDs, e.g., would be equal in PQ. However, the best HDTVs are notably better, and they cost more. You get what you pay for.

"4k is potentially a bigger earner"

Every time something new comes along, whether 720p HD, 1080p HD, 1080p/24 HD, 1080p 3D HDTV, and now 4k HDTV, the consumer electronics companies want everyone to go out and buy a new set. Many people to this day still are satisfied with 720p sets, or nominal 1080p sets, which are severely compromised for price reasons.

3D did not sell through, e.g. In some respects plasma can be notably better, but 4k plasma is very expensive. OLED is also quite expensive. Sony sold a small (11" ?) OLED HDTV for multi-thousands.

http://www.oled-info.com/more-details-sonys-new-30-4k-and-class-oleds

"forced to buy compromised LCDs (which is what most current 4k sets are)"

ALL HDTVs are compromises to reach certain selling points and to be economically viable. Note:

http://www.chimei.com.tw/en/feature-detail.asp?tech_id=54

"CHIMEI Wide Color Gamut - 130% NTSC Color Gamut (LCD Displays)"

"A typical LCD monitor today can display about 72% of the NTSC gamut..."

A wide color gamut, xvYCC, has been adopted, but only the more expensive sets can reproduce those colors. This relates to the color depth of the displays. There are also questions involving digital artifacts, e.g. proper 1080p/24 movie reproduction, macro blocking/bit rate, and more. It's all a series of compromises, in every set.

Posted on Aug 12, 2013 6:12:58 AM PDT
mojo_navigator, define what a compromised LCD is.

Posted on Aug 10, 2013 6:31:39 AM PDT
What would improve our enjoyment would be an improvement of the current picture (eg contrast ratio, color depth) rather than more resolution. No point increasing the size if the fundamentals are still so wrong.

But, of course, 4k is potentially a bigger earner than picture improvement since it means everyone will go out an buy a new tv (if they are gullible to believe the marketing speak)

OLED may be a good idea though since it would improve on Plasma's picture. I'd hate to see a world where we're all forced to buy compromised LCDs (which is what most current 4k sets are)

Posted on Aug 9, 2013 10:17:54 AM PDT
lennmoab says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Jul 31, 2013 3:19:07 AM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on Jul 31, 2013 11:33:14 PM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 30, 2013 7:01:08 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 10, 2013 5:37:49 AM PDT
bfore13 says:
It depends on how important AV quality is to you. I want 1080p video with some form of lossless HD audio. I'm not getting that from streaming and certainly not from digital copies so I'm sticking to Blu-ray for the foreseeable future. I also don't have any issues with scratched/lost disks.

Posted on Jul 29, 2013 12:16:33 PM PDT
K. Thomason says:
I think the pride of ownership, or whatever, that some feel when holding the physical product in their hands is probably generational. My 6 year-old won't necessarily need that when he's an adult. A digital copy alone will probably do the same thing for him. People are building digital music libraries without needing to buy CDs these days. I'm surprised that it's even a discussion.

My issue is that physical copies get scratched or lost. I'm at a crossroads. I have a huge collection of kids' DVDs that need replacing. But with what? I don't want more DVDs. Even with great care, between road trips, plane trips, visits to grandma's house and just regular use at home, they just get lost or scratched.

Should I be investing in digital copies? It seems like 2 movies take up all the storage on a tablet or similar. Seriously, what's the plan here? A massive hard drive that moves from TV to car to plane with you? It sure does seem like any viable streaming option is a ways off, and when you're trying to entertain a cranky 3-year-old, you need that thing to WORK and NOW. There has to be something better than physical copies that get damaged or lost, streaming that is shaky at best on the road, or a device management process that requires a tired parent to be constantly rotating just a few movies onto and off of a device (only to inevitably be told that they have loaded all the wrong movies).

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 10, 2013 7:24:50 AM PDT
Mathew J says:
For the most part, yes. The studios have to believe they are likely to make a profit. And a good film restoration can be horrifically expensive. I really can't blame them very much.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 9, 2013 7:03:09 PM PDT
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Posted on Jan 15, 2013 2:13:16 AM PST
Fred says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2013 5:12:56 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 2, 2013 5:17:07 PM PST
NetGod says:
+1@Izekael

What Izekael says makes perfect since. As much as you all would love to see physical copies go away, it's not about to happen. Much of the US does not even have broadband access and there are actually people who still have zero internet access.
and,
Are you really in a hurry to give up possession of a movie and trust the company holding it in the cloud never goes bankrupt? Seems extremely risky to me.

Posted on Jan 2, 2013 2:55:22 PM PST
BluWalker says:
After bluray will come holographic movies. After that, we will be the main characters. Holodeck here I come.
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Discussion in:  Blu-ray forum
Participants:  59
Total posts:  255
Initial post:  Oct 8, 2012
Latest post:  Nov 2, 2013

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