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Celiac Foundation Issues Warning about Elisabeth Hasselbeck's Book


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Showing 1-19 of 19 posts in this discussion
Initial post: May 11, 2009 12:59:36 PM PDT
Hi guys, I hope everyone is aware that the Celiac Foundation last week issued a warning about Elisabeth Hasselbeck's new book on "g-free" dieting. The Celiac Foundation warns the book is highly inaccurate, dangerous and trivialises what are serious medical conditions. You should check out the Celiac Foundation's warning before buying the book.

Posted on May 31, 2009 5:35:04 AM PDT
I guess the celian foundation is covering their butts. But it seems to be that we all know that Elisabeth Hasselbeck is not a doctor. She's a person who has celiac and can only tell of her own experiences,which may be interesting to others, like myself, who have celiac. I know that my experience with celiac is unique to me and I could never advise anyone else how to treat the condition. But in my own memoir I do mention celiac and the effects that it had on me and my life and health. I have known others whose experience is different and they have to learn about their own body and listen to their doctors. Unlike some "diseases" it effects different people in different ways. The condition is more serious in some than in others. Her book tells of her condition. Use your brain when reading.,

Posted on Jun 7, 2009 8:43:13 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 7, 2009 8:50:05 AM PDT
The Celiac Foundation is an authority (but may not have all the information) which understands the range of Celiac Disease to the extent that research and other's personal experience, the warning is fair based on their understanding, not necessary covering their butts. Most individuals reading Elisabeth Hasselbeck's book most likely will remember that statements she made were based on personal experience but for those who are new to Celiac's Disease may mis-understand the variety of symptoms that can be experienced even though-out the years of the same person's life. Even many doctors who think they know what Celiac Disease does or could do are limited in their understanding since continual update regarding recent studies, research or checking up information through the foundation is necessary to gain this information. Also "g-free" dieting can be quite complicated if the individual has, like many with Celiac Disease, two or more diseases (which often happens). Sometimes it takes years before the individual has a clear idea of their health issues. In the event this is the case, just following the traditional diet can be only partially healing. Reading a book on an individual's personal experience has value if kept in perspective and not generalized including the dieting part. If a person wishes to be well-rounded on the subject, it takes effort to review many sources, and this book may be one.

Posted on Jun 14, 2009 11:32:57 AM PDT
critterlover says:
I don't know if I have celiac disease or not but I do know that I have lots of intestinal issues. I get cramping and bloating and have had medication many years ago for what was called an irritable bowel syndrome. I haven't taken anything in probably 20 years but I still have issues, I have been wondering if I should go gluten free?

Posted on Jun 14, 2009 11:32:59 AM PDT
[Deleted by the author on Jun 14, 2009 11:33:28 AM PDT]

Posted on Jun 14, 2009 11:33:02 AM PDT
critterlover says:
I don't know if I have celiac disease or not but I do know that I have lots of intestinal issues. I get cramping and bloating and have had medication many years ago for what was called an irritable bowel syndrome. I haven't taken anything in probably 20 years but I still have issues, I have been wondering if I should go gluten free?

Posted on Jun 14, 2009 6:50:20 PM PDT
Kbean says:
Having never read this book, I cannot comment on its content. In the very least, I'm grateful that Celiac Disease is receiving some attention considering the struggles millions of people face every day due to poor manufacturing & labeling processes. (I.e. just because a product is labeled "gluten free" does not mean it's gluten free. Also, gluten can be hiding in prescription medications, soap, shampoo, cosmetics, and more than someone having never been exposed to Celiac Disease can imagine.)
I did see her on The View discussing her struggles with Celiac Disease & current gluten free diet. I was a bit astounded she featured an abundance of gluten free products yet never mentioned that FDA is still in the process of regulating companies. After being diagnosed with Celiac Disease, I found out the hard way that many frozen meals & other processed GF foods contained gluten. Now there is a very slim list of companies I trust. Yet, I'm only one person and this is my experience. Others, I'm sure, have different issues and trials to face.

Like I said, I'm just grateful it's getting some sort of attention. Hopefully this petition is still open. It's a major problem for me and millions of other Americans.
http://www.celiac.com/articles/21745/1/Citizens-Petition-to-the-Food-and-Drug-Administration-FDA-to-Make-Drugs-Gluten-Free/Page1.html
It really sucks to need a medication that your doctor cannot prescribe due to the fact he/she is unsure if it's safe for you to take. We have enough medical problems and this would radically improve our lives.

Posted on Jun 17, 2009 6:58:21 PM PDT
Sorry but the Celiac Foundation is not speaking for celiacs, this time. Frankly, we are thrilled that celiac is getting any mainstream attention. My teenage daughter is a celiac, and I would definitely recommend this book to her. Not to diagnose or treat her condition (duh!!) but to commiserate. Puh-lease. Why does every book written by someone with special needs have to be a medical book. Elisabeth H is a PERSON first, celiac second. So my daughter (and others) can relate to her as a person.
I hope there are more and more books like this.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 24, 2009 11:53:13 AM PDT
Ann Stone says:
Critterlover,
It depends on if you want to know if you actually have Celiac. Before my daughter had the biopsy to see if she had Celiac, she was told not to begin eating gluten free before the biposy, as it could possibly change the results. So, if you just want to see if you feel better on the GF diet, try it! But, if you want to know for sure if you have Celiac, see your gastro and schedule a biopsy first.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 3, 2009 7:36:28 AM PDT
SF says:
Get tested for Celiac, start with the celiac panel (your Dr. should know what to run) and see what that shows. Don't start a Gluten free diet until you get tested.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 18, 2009 7:39:17 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 18, 2009 7:45:35 PM PDT
FarmerJean says:
I'm not sure how you get the idea that celiac is different from any other autoimmune illness. If you consume gluten, your body has an autoimmune response which may manifest itself in everything from diarrhea to dementia to cancer. Lupus is similar in its widely varried effects, but the basic underlying mechanism is the same-its just a matter of what will the disordered immune response "attack". The conditon is quite serious in every single person that has it-while your symptoms may be mild at times, its a ticking time bomb. I did not have symptoms for years, now I have peripheral and autonomic neuropathy, dystonia...now if you're taking about gluten intolerance that is another thing (uncomfortable, sometimes severely so, but not fatal), but celiac should always be treated as the serious life threatening disease that it is. If possible you should always get a proper diagnosis so your doctor can monitor you for long term complications. I have them, and they are not fun! Now I need to go look up this book and see what the controversy is about, but please if you have celiac or think you may have celiac, take it seriously. I can no longer walk without a cane, and I have serious problems with my bladder, vision etc.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 19, 2009 8:21:54 PM PDT
Maybe...but please know that it is important to be diagnosed and you cannot be properly diagnosed if you are following a Gluten free diet already. You must be eating gluten for the testing to be accurate.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 21, 2009 11:28:39 AM PDT
Wayward says:
Critterlover:
First you NEED to go to a qualified dr and get tested for celiac disease. Look up The Gluten File on google for a list of tests to ask your dr to run. If you can't afford to get tested, or are dealing with insurance issues, you can use tests such as enterolab. However, once you commit to a gluten free diet you will never be able to "go back" and see if it really was celiac. A gluten challenge can make you very ill, after experiencing health! And it's possible to get enough gluten to cause damage without symptoms, so if it is celiac then it's better to have the dx and regular follow ups with your dr.

Once tested, if negative, it won't hurt to try going gluten free in case it is an intolerance. But rule out Celiac first. Good luck!

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 28, 2009 7:29:06 AM PDT
AJH says:
Get tested first before you go GF!!!! If you go GF before getting tested, you will not get correct results for your testing

In reply to an earlier post on May 10, 2010 8:04:46 PM PDT
Jaqui Karr says:
you need to get yourself to a gastro-intestinal specialist and get a biopsy - it's the only sure way. and do it before you go gluten-free, because that's the only time to check for the antibodies proving if you are Celiac or not

In reply to an earlier post on May 10, 2010 8:04:48 PM PDT
Jaqui Karr says:
you need to get yourself to a gastro-intestinal specialist and get a biopsy - it's the only sure way. and do it before you go gluten-free, because that's the only time to check for the antibodies proving if you are Celiac or not

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 26, 2010 6:07:47 PM PST
J. ONEILL says:
YES

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 12, 2011 3:49:48 AM PST
SDH says:
I had issues for years with what seemed like IBS and also later with GERD and anemia, etc...I've only recently been diagnosed with Celiac disease and already the change in diet (going totally gluten-free) has made an enormous difference in how I feel. You could try going gluten free and see how you feel however, you need to be eating gluten if you are planning to get tested because if you stop the gluten it can affect the test results. If you have a good GP you should discuss this with him/her and see about getting tested.

Posted on Jan 17, 2014 2:09:06 PM PST
Biopsies USED to be considered best test to determine Celiac Disease (CD). NOW there are Genetic Tests which can be ordered by your doctor (Naturopath doctor will order these) OR you can order the Gene Tests yourself @ www.Enterolab.com . It is clear diagnosis with the gene test.
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Discussion in:  Celiac forum
Participants:  16
Total posts:  19
Initial post:  May 11, 2009
Latest post:  Jan 17, 2014

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