Automotive Deals HPCC Amazon Fashion Learn more Discover it Pink Floyd Fire TV Stick Health, Household and Grocery Back to School Handmade school supplies Shop-by-Room Amazon Cash Back Offer TarantinoCollection TarantinoCollection TarantinoCollection  Amazon Echo  Echo Dot  Amazon Tap  Echo Dot  Amazon Tap  Amazon Echo Starting at $49.99 All-New Kindle Oasis AutoRip in CDs & Vinyl Water Sports
Customer Discussions > Christianity forum

All true Christians have a duty to back Obama's healthcare reforms.


Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-25 of 984 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Nov 28, 2012 2:15:54 AM PST
MC Zaptone says:
I'm outraged when I hear people saying that Obamacare is a form of socialism, an act of liberalism too far or the Government's forcing people into something they don't want.
Surely, to God, this is about making sure every American has the right to
medical help should they need it, no matter if they are poor; old; disenfranchised; live unhealthy lifestyles or even stupid and lazy. This shouldn't even be a political issue. A first world country; a leader in so many thing, in the modern world must look after it's own people first and foremost and with complete equality, with complete love. Anyone who claims to be a true Christian would surely embrace this.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 28, 2012 5:40:44 AM PST
RKG says:
well i was refunded over $500.00 by my insurance carrier.

i for one love me some obama health reform!!!!

Posted on Nov 28, 2012 5:45:42 AM PST
King's Kid says:
TRUE CHRISTIANS? Ain't no such animal. If you accept Jesus' death and resurrection as salvific. You're a Christian. Everything else is just window dressing.

Posted on Nov 28, 2012 5:48:29 AM PST
Brian Curtis says:
I approve of your cause, but I can't accept your reasoning, M.C. Christians should never vote their religious beliefs into law, period. It's unconstitutional.

Vote for and support Obamacare if you think it's good for America--but NOT because it aligns with your religious beliefs, which have no place in U.S. law.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 28, 2012 6:51:05 AM PST
DocMMV says:
Really? "True Christians" replace doctors, not visit them.
Oh, and God has absolutely nothing to do with proposals out of the demoncrat party.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 28, 2012 6:54:49 AM PST
Vicki says:
Dear M.C. Williams,

There are good things about Obamacare and there are some troubling things about the law. I don't see why my being Christian should cause me to automatically overlook those trouble spots and call it all good.

Posted on Nov 28, 2012 7:00:09 AM PST
MC Zaptone says:
I'm the OP, and an atheist, just want to know how you guys roll with the whole God/humanitarian/political thing. Don't see too many Christians fighting the 'nay' corner!

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 28, 2012 7:03:00 AM PST
M. C. Williams: Every American does NOT have an automatic right to go to free doctors every 30 days and load up on refills of every sort of free pain pill, anxiety pill, psychiatric pill, and sleeping pill for decades until their organs are overwhelmed and their bloodstreams are toxic.

We are the world leader in drug addicts and it's getting worse every day. We don't have enough doctors and nurses to shift services away from the sickest to die of treatable conditions and toward countless able bodied drug abusers.

We can no more afford all these free pills than a free Cadillac in every driveway or a free Iphone in every pocket. Social security and medicare will already run huge deficits when all the baby boomers retire in 10 years. When leaders waste taxpayer money decade after decade, the whole population has to suffer some sacrifices.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 28, 2012 7:06:01 AM PST
RKG says:
a cadillac is not a necessity. your analogy is specious at best
any civilized society - any society that considers itself civilized should at a minimum provide health care to its citizenry.

Posted on Nov 28, 2012 7:09:41 AM PST
Sean B says:
Giving broad control over healthcare in America has nothing to do with compassionate Christian values. As a Chrsitian, I help people out based on love, not based on the IRS taking a tax out of my paycheck and paying for someone's healthcare based on some formula which is based on some regulation.

The responsibility to take care of health issues lies primarily with the person affected. Next, family can help out. Finally, an appeal to others can be made. In this way, all involved are blessed and accountability is bolstered. It si the most efficient (no wasted treatment, funds, etc.). And, when the person struggling can get better they will be motivated to pay it forward.

Government ran healthcare merely takes over responsibility for one's own health from the individual and family and places it in the hands of bureaucrats and regulators. Neither the giver (tax paying worker), receiver (sick person), or redistributor (government) are blessed.

And, I may be pushing this a little beyond me audience here, but has anyone considered the posibility of making our free market health care system compatible with that to the north (Canada) as a step toward a North American Union, which includes Canada, the USA, and Mexico. It's in the works if one desires to look into it. This would all seriously erode the importance of the US Constitution, values, and free market approach.

Sean B

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 28, 2012 7:10:11 AM PST
MC Zaptone says:
Then return your healthcare credits and ask your politicians to run better education policies with that money.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 28, 2012 7:14:02 AM PST
Vicki says:
Dear MC,

As a Christian, I find it troubling that we are expecting more and more from government- perhaps far far more than it is able to do and not necessarily what it was designed to do.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 28, 2012 7:19:44 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 28, 2012 7:20:45 AM PST
MC Zaptone says:
Your assumption is that everyone is 'blessed' with caring friends and families. National Health Services work well, funded from central government in most European countries and the UK. It's not perfect by a long shot but I believe you have to adopt the policy of saying "We don't believe in allowing people to slip through unaided, they are fellow countrymen" If you, as an American, fell ill in the UK for example you would have two choices, go private; pay top dollar and receive prompt, good quality health treatment or see a local doctor, wait your turn for treatment (depending on severity) like everyone else BUT you wouldn't be turned away. It's called putting people before money and should be a basic hospitality (where the word hospital comes from).

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 28, 2012 8:38:47 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 28, 2012 9:07:31 AM PST
RKG says:
and yet you are one of those same people that wants the government to legislate what women should do with their bodies

and yet you are one of those same people that wants the government to legislate who people should sleep with and love.

as a christian i find it troubling that we are expecting the government to be involved only when it's our pet projects.

Posted on Nov 28, 2012 9:06:21 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 28, 2012 11:33:19 AM PST
RKG says:
it is a downright shame that some christians do not see the immorality and amorality of their position.

the problems related to poverty in america are much too big to claim that charity is the solution and or everyone should pull him or herself up by his or her own bootstraps. less than 90% of the help received by the less advantaged comes from private sources. my church has a food bank that provides groceries to families on a weekly basis. we are seeing longer and longer lines with no increase in funds required feed the disadvantaged. some churches are in the same boat and some churches are not - because they do nothing, either because they can't help anyone outside their own congregation or because they choose to blame the poor for their situation and self-righteously turn their backs. i very much believe private charity has an important place, but it is delusional to think and to suggest that churches would do more if government would do less. both are needed and should be encouraged by Christians.

i am constantly also amused that the same christians who spew the rubbish about smaller government and everyone pulling themselves up by their bootstraps are not on the forefront of telling corporations to stop expecting government handouts and corporate welfare.

Posted on Nov 28, 2012 9:42:33 AM PST
Rev Otter says:
"If this is going to be a Christian nation that doesn't help the poor, either we have to pretend that Jesus is just as selfish as we are or we've got to acknowledge that he commanded us to love the poor and serve the needy without condition. And then admit that we just don't want to do it."
-- Stephen Colbert

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 28, 2012 9:44:05 AM PST
A Customer says:
I find it kind of funny when an atheist is telling Christians what their duty as a Christian is.

Next week he'll be telling Muslims what Muslim theology calls them to do.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 28, 2012 9:52:01 AM PST
MC Zaptone says:
Yep, hilarious isn't it.........the way people will do anything BUT address the question and the problem it raises.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 28, 2012 9:55:14 AM PST
[Deleted by Amazon on Jul 15, 2016 3:29:17 PM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 28, 2012 10:13:03 AM PST
Brian Curtis says:
"as a christian i find it troubling that we are expecting the government to be involved only when it's our pet projects."

Which is why I say that NO religious beliefs have a place in U.S. law--whether I personally agree with them or not. We can have religious laws or we can have freedom, but not both.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 28, 2012 10:19:09 AM PST
S. Kessler says:
Love this quote.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 28, 2012 10:19:33 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 28, 2012 10:20:13 AM PST
S. Kessler says:
That, too. Just underscores the hypocrisy of many Christians.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 28, 2012 11:01:51 AM PST
[Deleted by the author on Nov 30, 2012 2:56:04 PM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 28, 2012 11:23:07 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Nov 28, 2012 11:34:56 AM PST
RKG says:
you are forgetting the part where Jsus is apparently not only is selfish,but bigoted and a gun nut and only interested in abortion and gay sex, didn'tcha know...

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 28, 2012 11:24:02 AM PST
No, that was Moses (Charlton Hesten).
‹ Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ... 40 Next ›
[Add comment]
Add your own message to the discussion
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Prompts for sign-in
 


Recent discussions in the Christianity forum

 

This discussion

Discussion in:  Christianity forum
Participants:  68
Total posts:  984
Initial post:  Nov 28, 2012
Latest post:  Nov 16, 2013

New! Receive e-mail when new posts are made.
Tracked by 2 customers

Search Customer Discussions