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The Brick Bible Reviews


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Posted on May 15, 2012 7:31:06 PM PDT
G. J. Stein says:
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In reply to an earlier post on May 15, 2012 7:33:17 PM PDT
A customer says:
"Come on, Alex. You didn't find this interesting at all."

Actually, I do.

I was raised in a fundamentalist Baptist school/church, and there is very little in the Brick Testament (Bible), that I was not taught or exposed to as a child. Thus I find it interesting that some Christians appear shocked and outraged to discover that much of the Old Testament is violent and innapropriate for certain audiences.

In reply to an earlier post on May 15, 2012 7:41:53 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 15, 2012 7:49:36 PM PDT
A customer says:
"Because it is not hinest."

Oh, but it is. It may not be presented without bias--ie: God's angry eyebrows, etc., but the source material is entirely Biblical, and the author cites chapter and verse.

"It is a designed attack on the Bible..."

Perhaps it is that, too. Mostly I think it is an attempt to draw attention to the extreme violence within the Old Testament. Using a child's toy, legos, was, in my opinion, an ingenius use of juxtaposition.

If one side only cherry-picks the "good" stuff, is it out of line for someone eslse to cherry-pick the "bad" suff, saying, "look, this is in here, too."

Fundamentalists hold up the Bible as the source of all things good, the bedrock of our morality. So yes, I find it very interesting when some of the same Christians are incensed when they are shown a few of the things the Good Book tells us.

For the record, it is my understanding that the Brick Testament was not intended to be marketed for children, but that the medium, legos, has caused some confusion. That being said, I'll leave you with the words of Thomas Paine, "Any system of religion that has anything in it that shocks the mind of a child, cannot be true."

In reply to an earlier post on May 15, 2012 7:45:59 PM PDT
A customer says:
"Everything that is in the Bible is not approved by God."

That is true. However, the scenes in the Brick Bible were not only approved by God, they were the result of his direct commandments.

"But this is not what we begin teaching children."

And many of us, including me, think that's the problem that leads to indoctrination. We do not teach children the full story in the Bible, we pick out certain parts, sugar coat it, so it will go down. Get them to sing songs about animals going into the ark, two by two, color a few pictures, but never giving a thought to the reality of what the Noachian Flood represents: global genocide.

We only show kids one side, get them to accept that, and then maybe later, if they get around to reading the Bible for themselves, they'll see the other stuff.

In reply to an earlier post on May 15, 2012 7:48:51 PM PDT
Birutegal says:
Just to point out one big lie that these type keep circulating: "God commanding women to be raped."

One sentence misunderstood, ripped out of the greater context of the entire Bible, and the dishonest run with it because they are desperate to denigrate the revelation given by God which contains morals that they really reject: their preferred sin of choice.

In reply to an earlier post on May 15, 2012 7:56:44 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 15, 2012 7:58:22 PM PDT
A customer says:
"It must feel hollow to have no principles to stand on and a foundation so small no one can see it, let alone bother to mock it and tear it down."

Stein, there are two general problems with the notion of the Bible as a moral foundation, and they can be summed up thusly:

1) Much of what is commanded in the Bible is immoral or irrelevant by any standard of ethics today, including Christian ethics.*

2) Much of what is considered ethical today, is not found in the Bible; much of what is in the Bible that is still considered ethical, is hardly unique to the Bible.

*(Yes, yes; I know, I know. The Old Testament was for a different people, a different time; it was a different covenant, law, dispensation etc. Makes no difference. The fact remains that at one time, an assortment of barbaric practices *were* considered ethical. All this gives you is an argument for moral relativism--what is moral is relative to a given place/time/people, relative to a given covenant dispensation; what is moral is relative to God's will. I am not a moral relativist).

Posted on May 15, 2012 8:04:09 PM PDT
G. J. Stein says:
Alex, (for example), the fact that King David lusted after Bathsheba, arranged the pre-meditated murder of her husband in order to have her, then went on to be known as the New Testament man in an Old Testament world, should give men like you and I hope for salvation at this time. If God left that dirty laundry in there to show His grace for David, how much more easily could it be for you and me who haven't quite crossed any of those lines yet, have we?

You really believe the dirty low down of the bible is something to be turned around about? It's something very bold and honest in my opinion. God's not pretending. He's not making things up as He goes along. This isn't a 90 minute Hollywood tale with a musical score. He's not shielding us from what is ultimately the same painful reality we all experience today. For the most part the "crap" part of the bible represents you and me today. So the joke may be on you if you can't see that. But, the power of God to deliver His people from their enemies is not to be played down or overlooked either.

It's a history book that points us to the Lord Jesus Christ. Where you go from there is what matters. Do you believe Jesus Christ was a man on the earth 2000 years ago, even in a historical sense?

In reply to an earlier post on May 15, 2012 8:35:13 PM PDT
G. J. Stein says:
@Birutegal:

The whole thing is mind numbingly out of context in these forums with the title of Christianity!
It's very much like both sides speak two different languages yet are trying to communicate.
I think you know as well as me what that "actually" is so, I'll leave it at that.

Love seeing you in battle mode though. ; ]

In reply to an earlier post on May 15, 2012 8:54:49 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 15, 2012 9:00:18 PM PDT
Birutegal says:
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Posted on May 15, 2012 9:10:36 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 15, 2012 9:25:52 PM PDT
G. J. Stein says:
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In reply to an earlier post on May 15, 2012 9:27:43 PM PDT
Birutegal says:
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In reply to an earlier post on May 15, 2012 9:33:44 PM PDT
Birutegal says:
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Posted on May 15, 2012 9:44:45 PM PDT
G. J. Stein says:
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In reply to an earlier post on May 15, 2012 9:49:13 PM PDT
Birutegal says:
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In reply to an earlier post on May 16, 2012 5:14:11 AM PDT
BV says:
Alex - ""Any system of religion that has anything in it that shocks the mind of a child, cannot be true."

Thank you for showing me that Thomas Paine had no common sense!

In reply to an earlier post on May 16, 2012 5:21:02 AM PDT
BV says:
GJ - "People who fear homosexuality the most....."

People like to say that Christians fear it, but do they? Just because they say something isn't right, does that indicate fear? I mean, would they say that people who say "don't drink and drive" fear alcoholism?

I know that sleeping with a different woman every day is wrong, but I'm not afraid of that happening to me!

In reply to an earlier post on May 16, 2012 5:23:45 AM PDT
RKG says:
i have never heard of this book before. i read the first couple of pages from genesis via the amazon site. where is the controversy? it realyed the account as stated in genesis just in a shorter version.

In reply to an earlier post on May 16, 2012 5:28:26 AM PDT
RKG says:
mrs exp

i find your last statement fascinating. do you mind expanding on what you mean please.

In reply to an earlier post on May 16, 2012 5:41:13 AM PDT
JosephusD says:
Isn't that kind of what we do to them in school when they're learning history too? We don't start out teaching them crimes against Native Americans and genocide and Civil War. We start out teaching them the Constitution and the Pledge of Allegiance and the Declaration of Independence (ie the "good" stuff). We teach that Thanksgiving is a celebration of the first meal between the Indians and the Pilgrims. Not many schools that I know of add "before we overthrew and mistreated the Indians until we had them all rounded up on little reservations so we could take their land" to the third-grade history lesson.

In reply to an earlier post on May 16, 2012 8:10:26 AM PDT
A customer says:
"...unfortunately, the boys had to be killed for they would grow up to avenge their fathers. Hard facts."

Yes, unfortunately. This is not the first time I've been appalled by your night sociopathic apologetics, and unfortunately it isn't likely to be the last.

How is it that an omnipotent, all powerful god is frequently left with no choice but to kill...like, everyone.

Would it be moral to do this today? We live in a world of terrorism. Hard facts. Unfortunately we need to put all the Iraqi and Afghani and, why not, Iranian boys and young men into extermination camps and kill them, or else they'll only grow up to avenge themselve on the US.

When I say your sociopathic, it is not an empty insult--I truly think you have dificulties with human empathy. How else can one merely shrug their shoulders at the thought of children being put to the sword, their sisters abducted to be slaves and wives, and say, "hard facts."

"Thank God, he ended the live human sacrifice among the canaanites..."

You've been posting this for years, and you have yet to explain how killing people prevents them from being killed.

"They did not have pow camps, nor could they take care of the large number of children as the tribes were far larger than the Israelites."

I ask again, why is it that omnipotent Yahweh is left with no other option than death? They worshiped a god that literally rained food down from the sky and made water gush from desert rock, yet care for POWs and women and children of a foreign enemy--a moral obligation we recognize today, and your god is tapped out.

In reply to an earlier post on May 16, 2012 8:12:17 AM PDT
A customer says:
"Thank you for showing me that Thomas Paine had no common sense!"

"Without the pen of Paine, the sword of Washington would have been wielded in vain." John Adams

In reply to an earlier post on May 16, 2012 8:18:36 AM PDT
A customer says:
"What they all have in common is attacking the Word of God and Christian-bashing."

Too often any criticism of Christianity or unflattering remarks is labeled "Christian-bashing."

In reply to an earlier post on May 16, 2012 10:14:08 AM PDT
BV says:
Alex - "Without the pen of Paine, the sword of Washington would have been wielded in vain." John Adams

"It is impossible to rightly govern a nation without God and the Bible." - George Washington

In reply to an earlier post on May 16, 2012 10:30:29 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 16, 2012 10:36:57 AM PDT
A customer says:
"As the Government of the United States of America is not, in any sense, founded on the Christian religion..." Submitted to the Senate by President John Adams, recieved unanimous ratification in 1797.

I enjoy this little game. But my point was to illustrate the naivety of your statement, "Thank you for showing me that Thomas Paine had no common sense!"

It is of course Thomas Paine's pamphlet, "Common Sense," that greatly inspired support for the American Revolution, producing several hundrend thousand copies. Thus John Adams statement, "Without the pen of Paine, the sword of Washington would have been wielded in vain," illustrates that without Paine's "common sense' to whip up support, the war may have gone considerably different.

In reply to an earlier post on May 16, 2012 10:37:06 AM PDT
mrs exp says:
Alex Miller,
"If one side only cherry-picks the "good" stuff, is it out of line for someone eslse to cherry-pick the "bad" suff, saying, "look, this is in here, too."

It fine if it is made clear that it isn't approved of by God but is the result of human sin.
exp
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Discussion in:  Christianity forum
Participants:  22
Total posts:  450
Initial post:  May 14, 2012
Latest post:  Jun 16, 2012

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