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CLASSIC MOVIE CHATLINE ~ Round 4 ~ (the original place for casual conversation)

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In reply to an earlier post on Jul 28, 2012 8:50:03 AM PDT
Indeed, Annie. I remember a program with Bernstein and he was also critical of Gershwin's concert works, albeit mildly so. They reflected a lack of concentrated classical training. They weren't organic wholes. I think Bernstein called them a string of tunes that segued into each other. Something like that. Still, of course, he loved them.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 28, 2012 1:37:59 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 28, 2012 1:38:34 PM PDT
Franklin--
Maybe Bernstein and Thomson were awed by and jealous of George Gershwin's originality and enormous talent.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 28, 2012 3:29:14 PM PDT
C McGhee says:
Annie- TWILIGHT ZONE: THE MOVIE (1983).

Yes, a sad day for movie making, but it is a show you'll enjoy.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 28, 2012 7:28:40 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 28, 2012 7:34:26 PM PDT
No, no, Annie. Why should they be jealous when they have enormous talents of their own. It's not unusual in the musical sphere that one will be will be very adept in a particular area and not others. Very often opera composers won't do as well in standard non-theatrical music. We remember Wagner for his operatic music, not his non-theatrical music. Beethoven, so far as I know, wrote only one opera, "Fidelio." And it's not a part of the standard repertoire at all. Mozart was an exception. Remember Gershwin came to classical music late. He was steeped in pop music. He began learning classical forms as an already prolific theatrical and pop music. Most pure classical composers begin as children. Porgy and Bess is a true opera and a marvelous one. Bernstein himself recognized his shortcomings as a composer of light theatrical music. He was often asked why he hadn't written more pop songs in his musicals. He said, it just wasn't in his training. But, even with his lack of pop songs, he brought a classical theatrical sensibility to his Broadway endeavors that expanded the form.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 28, 2012 8:24:16 PM PDT
Franklin--
I didn't say Lenny was without talent, but that Gershwin was his superior in pure inventiveness, and that's why he was quick to dismiss some great music. It's vanity. There's folks who will find any fault they can in another's work if they feel at all threatened or insecure about their own. It's a supposition based on general human behavior.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 30, 2012 5:47:39 PM PDT
Gorgar says:
I still can't imagine anyone else but "The S/h/a/t" performing in "Nightmare at 20,000 Feet".

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 30, 2012 5:50:38 PM PDT
Gorgar says:
I think Aaron Copeland blows both of them away at 50 paces...but that's just my opinion. I also believe that Scriabin was the best of the Russian composers. He was lightyears ahead of his time.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 30, 2012 6:40:01 PM PDT
C McGhee says:
Gorgar- S/h/a/t

Yes, he was perfect in that role. Another hurrah for casting!

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 30, 2012 7:52:23 PM PDT
Gorgar says:
IIRC, Bill was in at least one more Twilight Zone. He popped up frequently in the most-unexpected places in TV's 'salad' days.
Watching some Trek this evening, btw. Started off with "Space Seed" with an impossibly-buff Ricardo Montalban. Now checking out "Operation, Annihilate!" Superb digital transfers on Netflix. :^)

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 30, 2012 9:39:21 PM PDT
C McGhee says:
Gorgar- Star Trek

The Botany Bay!!!!!!!!!

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 31, 2012 7:39:28 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 31, 2012 7:43:16 AM PDT
Annie, we'll have to agree to disagree. As I said, Bernstein loved Gershwin's attempts at classical forms and, had he lived, he could well have mastered them.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 31, 2012 11:15:59 AM PDT
Franklin--
That suits me fine. I was just 's'posin' anyway. :?)

One thing is sure: George Gershwin would've done much more had he lived. His attempts to meld the jazz and classical idioms hadn't been fully explored, although the opera PORGY 'N' Bess was a major step forward in the classical jazz genre, if you will.

Posted on Jul 31, 2012 11:22:31 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 31, 2012 11:23:17 AM PDT
I've experienced a minor miracle, the triumph of electronics over idiocy, as it were.

Maybe a year or more ago, I clumsily dropped my Zenith VCR remote into a bowl of homemade vegetable soup. It was deader than dead. almost in self-destruct mode, so I pulled the AA batteries out of it and set the thing on a shelf. Since then I've been laboring along with a crappy universal remote, having no way to adjust tape tracking, to name one important function.

Just now, I went to plug in a shelf stereo system so I can review some vinyl LPs and there was the Zenith remote, sitting where I abandoned it so many months ago. What would be the harm in popping fresh batteries in it, right?

Excelsior! The thing works as if it had never stopped. Something told me when this stupid accident occurred not to throw the remote away. Now I'm glad I didn't! LOL

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 31, 2012 1:35:17 PM PDT
C McGhee says:
Annie- Zenith

That doesn't seem remotely possible. :)

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 31, 2012 2:00:15 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 31, 2012 2:00:57 PM PDT
McGhee--
Ugh! lol
Believe it or leave it, baybee! :?D

Oh, the music I've been spinning this afternoon, all on original, nicely preserved vinyl:

LIGHT AND RIGHT - Neal Hefti Quintet
A COLUMBIA stereo rarity from 1956, by the guy who wrote the "BATMAN" theme is small group neo-bop.

BALALAIKA FAVORITES (1962)
The first-ever American recordings made inside the USSR by MERCURY sound engineers, after 10,000 lbs of sep van and equipment was shipped from NY to Russia. Fabulous stereo music!

THE SUPREMES SING HOLLAND DOZIER HOLLAND (1966)
Two of their hits plus covers of songs other Motown artists charted with and several now-forgotten HDH compositions.

INSIDE THE MIND OF BILL COSBY (1972)
His last release on the UNI label before it transitioned to MCA is Cosby's 16th overall.

RAY CHARLES LIVE IN CONCERT (1964)
Recorded in both mono and stereo at LA's Shrine Civic Auditorium includes great versions of "I Gotta Woman" and "What'd I Say."

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 31, 2012 6:35:51 PM PDT
Was it rinsed out before you put it on the self long ago? Or did the vegatable soup just dry on it?

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 31, 2012 9:24:09 PM PDT
Nancy--
I wiped the remote off as best I could after the accident and left it sitting buttons down on a towel, hoping whatever got inside might run out, but after a couple of days it still wasn't working, so I put it away and bought a universal remote. Never thought that it would ever work again. Kinda like my brother-in-law (rimshot!).

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 31, 2012 9:43:43 PM PDT
C McGhee says:
Annie- Never thought that it would ever work again. Kinda like my brother-in-law

I didn't know we were related by marriage. Hi sis!

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 31, 2012 9:47:42 PM PDT
McGhee--
As Nixon said on the Watergate Comedy Hour album: "Hold the rimshots!"

Posted on Jul 31, 2012 11:22:46 PM PDT
C McGhee says:
Annie- Watergate Comedy Hour album

Now that is one I missed.

I just finished revisiting the disco era cortesy of Joan Collins in The B/i/t/c/h & The Stud. It's strange that I remember those years existed but I can't remember why. Another child of the sixties born after the realization that the pendulum of the material idealism of the sixties must swing to the other extreme I suppose. What a terrible job of sound editing then (used quite frequently) the music blares & you can hardly hear the voice track. It's still nice to see a woman wearing a big fur coat with only undies underneath though. :)

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 31, 2012 11:54:39 PM PDT
McGhee--
It's the first track on Side two of that Burns & Schreiber political satire LP. Done as a spoof of the Tonight Show, with an Ed McMahon clone yelling aa-oooo! and a guy doing a great Nixon impression playing the show's host.

This is a bit overmodulated, so turn the volume low:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IdN6K9osB80

HOLD THE RIMSHOTS!

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 1, 2012 9:45:51 AM PDT
Yep.

Posted on Aug 1, 2012 12:31:26 PM PDT
*¨*`*☆∴**¨*`*☆∴*Good Afternoon Classics*∴☆*`**¨*`*☆*`* *¨*`*

Happy Hump Day and Happy August!..

YAY!!!

·*¨) ¸.·*¨) ¸.·*¨* (¸.*´ ¸.·´*'~* ♥♡♥ ~☆*Bittersweet*☆~

Posted on Aug 1, 2012 12:33:32 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 1, 2012 12:33:59 PM PDT
I just stopped by to say HI and to tell you that i haven't watched ONE film....old or new...all summer long <deep breath> but i did miss you anyway!!!

Well i did rent WANDERLUST...what a BUST!!!

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 1, 2012 2:16:38 PM PDT
C McGhee says:
Soooo Bittersweet- miss you anyway

Yep & we missed you too. I was going to tell my wife the difference between a Full Moon & a New Moon in a manner that didn't involve human maturity. I discovered that I couldn't remember your explanation of that. Could you help me out.
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Discussion in:  Classic Movie forum
Participants:  30
Total posts:  10000
Initial post:  Apr 18, 2012
Latest post:  Apr 16, 2013

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