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Customer Discussions > Classic Rock forum

The Led Zeppelin Discography Breakdown Thread


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Showing 76-100 of 890 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2013 8:30:14 AM PST
As album openers, I prefer 'Come Together' and 'Gimme Shelter' over 'Whole Lotta Love'. I love their moody, mysterious feel.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2013 8:32:58 AM PST
AlexMontrose says:
Re : But anyways...Alex...is it true that Gillan only demonstrated his high-range to people "in private" before Led Zeppelin burst onto the scene?

Can't say for sure Rogers, I wasn't there. But Topper was ;)

But I will say this. You breath in private....right? He was a singer. End of story.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2013 8:36:08 AM PST
B. rogers says:
Hey man, how 'bout those reviews?

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2013 8:46:43 AM PST
AlexMontrose says:
:)

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2013 9:01:44 AM PST
I see you have not got to LZIII yet. After playing it again I think we were right on first listen, it is a good album. I think over time it has become overrated. I do not think there is one great song on it. There is a terrible song [Hats] and a boring song [Tiles] and some really good songs. It is a solid album, but I do not think it is a great album.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2013 9:11:34 AM PST
To clarify, my favorite, Tangerine, might be great, but it always seems like it is missing something. Also, to me the endings of Immigrant and Celebration are marred by Plant going on and on. Like most lead singers he should have known when to shut up. They should have had a better, more defined ending, like the longer, live Immigrant on DVD.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2013 9:20:26 AM PST
Tangerine does feel a bit too short to me but that maybe because I like it so much.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2013 9:28:39 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 2, 2013 9:29:11 AM PST
Exile says:
I agree. Zep really isn't to my taste.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2013 9:30:25 AM PST
Exile says:
A very good album, but not great. Nope, we didn't get there yet.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2013 9:32:51 AM PST
Exile says:
I was inspired to break out the Stones first album due to this discussion. That is the formation of punk rock, if you ask me. That sparse garage rock sound played faster...It's a style I would choose any day of the week over Zeppelin's.

Posted on Jan 2, 2013 9:36:57 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 2, 2013 9:53:16 AM PST
@AlexMontrose: Once again, after wading through three paragraphs of pointless insults (which is of course the real reason why you're here), you get to your actual 'argument', if one can call it that: "

"And they asked Ian Gillan if he wanted to play the part. As you probably know that is in fact what happened. So if the music was written in '68 or 69 (obviously it was on the drawing board then)"

The more you try to demonstrate your knowledge of rock history, the more embarrassingly inaccurate you become. First you tried to say that Gillan was singing in his full range with Episode Six, which is how this whole side-bar got started. When I crushed that to oblivion (have you even heard any Episode Six at *all*? LOL), you resort to more desperate measures...yeah...it was "Jesus Christ Superstar" that Gillan auditioned for in 1968! That was it!!

Once again, sorry to so definitively burst your bubble but composition on the work--which was a rock opera concept LP first--began in September 1969, well after the debut of LZ. Ian Gillan had already been in DP for months (and Plant on the scene for over a year) before he was offered the lead role in December of 1969:

http://www.jesuschristsuperstar.com/the-show/the-history/?yearDate=1969

You really should not jump the gun on things you do not know--at least google the history of what you're talking about first! Or there's always that standby, good ol' wikipedia, it might actually do you some good--it's better than foaming at the mouth and looking so completely ignorant. And you act like the years 1968 and 1969 are interchangeable ("So if the music was written in '68 or 69...") when clearly they're not, because of the arrival of LZ's debut in January '69. JCS (a horrifying rock musical, even worse than "Hair") was written in the fall of '69, so this is all a complete non-argument and desperate clutching at straws on your part.

"Never before, never in a audition, never in private, never when practicing, never when he was younger singing along with his real influences, Little Richard and Elvis, never in a gig that you wouldn't see on youtube."

Yup, that's *exactly* what I'm saying. You're finally getting it!

"until Plant decided to raise his voice one octave for one line."

You keep stupidly harping on this "one line" nonsense. Clearly, Plant sings in a never-before-heard high register throughout the entire album. You can't even name me one person who sang like that before him, let alone your girlfriend Gillan! Oh, but I guess all those singers were just singing that way in private or "when practicing"...but none of them bothered to put it on record or in concert. OK. Then that just makes it totally irrelevant, because Plant actually *did*. Singing in a certain way means *diddly-squat* if no-one can hear it, fool!

@B.Rogers: "Alex...is it true that Gillan only demonstrated his high-range to people "in private" before Led Zeppelin burst onto the scene?"

Rogers--do you honestly think AlexMontrose actually knows what he's talking about? You think he was there at those "private" sessions in 1968? I mean, you may not know this, but this is the guy who triumphantly claimed that Ritchie Blackmore invented the technique of using the bow on a guitar!!! This is the guy who thought that DP were the first rock band to use an orchestra (on "Concerto"). This is the guy who thought that Jon Lord was the first person to use the hammond organ in a hard rock setting. Deep Purple is allegedly one of his favorite bands, but he seems to know NOTHING about them, except to try and twist rock history to make it seem like the guys in the band were the first at everything they did. So if there's no actual recorded evidence of Gillan using his high range before '69 (even though he'd been recording for three years prior to that), obviously it was during some "private" rehearsal, right? Except that, conveniently, there's no proof of this anywhere. He's a joke.

Just for the record, it was not Blackmore who was first to use the bow on a guitar (he didn't actually use it at all with DP in the 70s, Alex was mishearing another guitar technique used on "The Fool"), nor was it even Jimmy Page (who most people assume was the first). It was Eddie Phillips, the guitarist for a band called The Creation, who first used it on their amazing debut single "Making Time" in 1966. I mention this because I want to make it clear that I am not biased for the members of Led Zeppelin or trying to make up that they were the first at everything, like Alex does with Deep Purple. Page is an excellent, legendary guitarist, but was not the first to come up with the bow technique. But Plant *was* the first to put that kind of vocal style on record. If anyone can name me anyone who sang like that before him (and something with a little more proof than "private rehearsals" or mentioning some rock musical that was first developed nearly a year after LZ broke, LOL), then I'll prick my ears.

And the first rock group to record a full album with orchestra was, of course, The Moody Blues.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2013 9:38:29 AM PST
I just noticed all the Stones videos from the LA 75 concerts. Is there a DVD of it coming soon?

http://tiny.cc/zloaqw

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2013 9:40:54 AM PST
Exile says:
If they do, I sure hope it's not the bootleg I saw. Keith was a mess and it was a sloppy performance.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2013 9:41:17 AM PST
@Exile: "It's a style I would choose any day of the week over Zeppelin's."

Well, I'm not *too* surprised, considering your screen name. ;)

Mick Jagger has said that the only two Stones albums in their entire history that he likes are the debut album and "Beggar's Banquet". He dismisses *every* other one! The debut album is fine, but I think they got better over the next few years.

Although "Gimme Shelter" and "Sympathy" are both better openers than "Whole Lotta Love". Those are two of the best opening cuts for any album I can think of.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2013 9:56:26 AM PST
"He dismisses *every* other one" ~ this explains his exchange rate with women.

Posted on Jan 2, 2013 9:57:09 AM PST
@SA: LOL

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2013 10:24:12 AM PST
Exile says:
That's not uncommon where artists dislike their own work, is it? There are tons of examples of that. Jagger has a right to his opinion, but I also bet he thought his solo albums were the artistic pinnacles of his career. :)

I'm not downing Zep at all. Running through their catalogue will at least help me to appreciate them more, if not really convert me. As I stated in my OP, we like what we like...nothing more, nothing less.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2013 10:44:53 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 2, 2013 11:01:47 AM PST
B. rogers says:
I'll be interested to read your reviews of IV and beyond. That is the era that I think they really blossomed and made the albums I fell in love with in my youth. Give me "In Through The Out Door" any day over the debut.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2013 10:57:19 AM PST
Exile says:
I'll be quite busy with work today so hopefully I can give my 2 cents on the rest of II later tonight. But, as a tease....I think Zep IV was their last album of artistic growth. PG is pretty solid, very solid but I don't see it as expanding their sound as opposed to giving us more of what they have done up to that point.

It's been awhile so maybe I will see it in a different light this time around.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2013 11:01:18 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 2, 2013 11:02:30 AM PST
B. rogers says:
Well, III is pretty damned awesome as is(about 60%) of II. I guess the only Zep I have little use for is the debut album.

Posted on Jan 2, 2013 11:02:00 AM PST
Exile says:
Edit to the above...there would be more growth on Houses....but really it's been a long time for me. I recall liking half of it and feeling the other half was junk...I would rather wait until I relisten before sticking my foot in my mouth...LOL

Posted on Jan 2, 2013 11:06:24 AM PST
I remember Keith talking about Bonam saying that his playing made their name fit perfect. That heavy pounding beat very lead like. He said he would take Charlie any day cause of his feel and swing. Guess that a little bit illustrates a difference between the two bands.

I love Charlies playing it really fits Keiths feel but i also love Bonzo and that heavy pounding lead style which fits Jimi's power chords. "When The Leavee Breaks" that heavy beat is so cool but then you have "Sympathy For The Devil" and its building groove and feel that is heavy in mood, both rock for me.

"Immigrant Song" is a cool opener. Especially since the rest of the album is so mellow, nice contradiction.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2013 11:07:21 AM PST
B. rogers says:
LOL...I've been editing my posts, too! Whether there was continued "growth" or not I prefer mid-period/late era the best. The more I think about it, I would throw III into that *personally preferred* era. When I was a kid, it was my least favorite Zep release(other than the debut), but boy, has it grown on me over the years!

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2013 11:11:24 AM PST
B. rogers says:
Charlie Watts is fantastic...his playing got better and better as time went on. Yes, there was a great "swing" to his playing that fit like a glove with Wyman's playing. One of(if not THE best) rhythm sections ever.

Comparing Watts and Bonham though is strange...talk about apples and oranges!

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2013 11:24:58 AM PST
Exile says:
Keith said he felt Bonham was at times too 'heavy-handed' and I agree. But I also agree that was how Zep was so he did fit their style perfectly.

Levee is otherworldly.....

I see the natives are getting restless...I will try to finish Zep II in a little bit.
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Discussion in:  Classic Rock forum
Participants:  31
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Initial post:  Dec 30, 2012
Latest post:  Feb 3, 2013

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