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Death of the CD?


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Initial post: Apr 29, 2012 5:45:02 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 29, 2012 5:46:35 PM PDT
KenOC says:
March, where did your thread go? You referred to this article:

http://www.side-line.com/news_comments.php?id=46980_0_2_0_C

Anyway, some debunking.

http://tinyurl.com/7j8h67g

Posted on Apr 29, 2012 6:37:01 PM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on May 16, 2012 6:21:53 AM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 30, 2012 4:45:34 AM PDT
Here is what I wrote on this thread in the music forum:
http://www.amazon.com/forum/music/ref=cm_cd_et_jump?_encoding=UTF8&cdForum=Fx1YA4ZE83NG9MC&cdPage=2&cdThread=Tx3JM0GI9F82O9J#CustomerDiscussionsLPIT

Honestly I'm not convinced that this is a reliable source - I would like to see it confirmed in other publications... (refering to Side Line)
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CDs and downloads are already history. Streaming via Spotify and other services is the present and the future. If CDs aren't abandoned now they will be later - you might as well get used to the fact... I'm as old-fahioned as anybody else here clinging to the physical format, but I see great advantages in the new technology.

Posted on Apr 30, 2012 4:58:43 AM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on May 16, 2012 6:21:42 AM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 30, 2012 5:06:22 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 30, 2012 5:07:52 AM PDT
march

You said it!
I was going to make streaming my primary source for listening to music, but ran into various technical problems that are very annoying - so I will definately keep my CDs - I haven't even thrown out my old LPs yet! As time goes by I think the technology will get better and more reliable, but for now it's still nice to have the physical discs.

BTW : Here in Denmark one of the biggest book publishers is planning to offer streaming of books in a year or two!! - interesting perspective...

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 30, 2012 5:06:51 AM PDT
K. Beazley says:
Ken,

There was a simlarly scathing essay in response to the "Side Line" article in the January "Gramophone" by their Audio Editor, Andrew Everard, who pointed out that, on current projections, CD's will *still* account for 57% of market share in 2015. As he says, "In other words, far from the CD being a dodo within the year, it'll still account for the majority of the market four years from now".

So Rasmus, it appears you'll be able to continue being "old-fahioned" for a good while yet. ;-)

Kim.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 30, 2012 5:12:32 AM PDT
Kim

Good to hear that!
Another factor to reckon with here is : PRICE. For old-timers like us the prices on CDs are ridiculously low. A box set with 10 cds often cost about as much as a single CD from a big label cost in the old days. That makes many people over 30 hold on to the CDs. Compared to what we grew up with it's just so cheap that we can't help buying...
See the current discussion on the Orders thread about an 8 disc Neumann Dvorak set for 7 dollars!!!

Posted on Apr 30, 2012 7:54:44 AM PDT
HB says:
I was once told that surround sound would eliminate stereo receivers and amplifiers. Stereo is still around. And way back in the early '50's, television was supposed to eliminate movies. Movies are still around.

No doubt, the major recording companies would rather sell downloads than the more expensive, but much less profitable, CDs. But I predict that CDs will stay around for a long time due to their superior sound, etc.

Posted on Apr 30, 2012 8:42:17 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 30, 2012 8:51:31 AM PDT
as I have pointed out.
My current cds aren't going anywhere, even if the format gets 'phased out' and I cannot get new recordings on cds, I just don't see myself getting rid of my collection that I have spent 28 years acquiring. when cds first came out, I couldn't replace my LP collection fast enough because they just sounded better.

maybe if a new format comes around that sounds better than cds I might change my mind.

by the way, I born in 1960, I'm comfortable with having a physical library.
Needing storage space is part of my existence. Kind of like dressers for my clothing.

Posted on Apr 30, 2012 11:41:23 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 30, 2012 12:57:46 PM PDT
scarecrow says:
our hearing capacity has only deteriorated since the radio; and now most consumers use bean-plugs, earphones, all versus LIVE music, and when music is live as Rock concerts, the decibel level is way beyond what our poor ears can take; the decibel level of orchestras has also accelerated,our ears are actually the poorest most primitive body part we got;

CDs will be around as long as the producer,composer can attach a concept to it, an icon, a lifeworld(like Lady Gaga), all that is required is "Symphony", that's an idea, a concept; or "phantom Sonata". . .or "piece for Bassoon in three parts"; but then all you need is a Tune,one piece, one item, an mp3, you don't need 50 minutes of music to instill a concept, an icon. . . to sell it. . and then in serious music, larger works can be performed in scaled down conceptions, as Stockhausen's LICHT, you can do/perform any part of it; even a solo clarinet fragment from it; this is consistent with Stockhausen's world philosophy that his music arguably is simply part of the ether of the universe; too bad there is always $$$$ attached to these fragments from the universe;
And then who today has long term durational listening capacity?

we are a dwindling minority--- those who can sit through 50-70 minutes of music, everything is accelerated, that's why there is no innovation in culture, for artists today are simply working off the achievements of the past, the tried and tested, there is no time to prance out, trot-out a new paradigm, too much time is required for that, no one has patience for that;How can I pay my bills if I'm working on a new paradigm for Art, it's wholly unrealistic; Fast, Fast, Make the Bucks$$$ no time.
Each generation works off the past.. . So on one level, the free electronics improvisors are working off the old avant-garde,post-Cage, and the post-WW2 avant-garde post minimalism, it's all there to utilize, why not use it. . . . Go write a Symphony you got plenty of models. . .shapes, forms,already given to make things go faster, much like in architecture today, they have pre-fabricated everything, and building materials where you can put up a skyscraper in less time than ever before; in music I guess we got faster building materials, minimalism, pop=avant-garde, melody, chord progressions, studio techniques, sophistication. . .even just intonation pieces are becoming more streamlined in production time required for a performance, you have just intonation specialists who go to rehearsals to check the tunings accuracy, much like Johnson Controls checks the air quality, air capacity for office buildings;

Posted on Apr 30, 2012 4:27:11 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 30, 2012 4:29:23 PM PDT
DavidRFoss says:
palJacky says:
as I have pointed out.
My current cds aren't going anywhere, even if the format gets 'phased out' and I cannot get new recordings on cds, I just don't see myself getting rid of my collection that I have spent 28 years acquiring. when cds first came out, I couldn't replace my LP collection fast enough because they just sounded better.
-----------------------------
The CD-to-file transition is going to be a much more seemless transition than previous format changes in history. We're not really talking about a change in "format". A CD-ROM is a "read-only memory" disc intended for computers to read. On that disc are "lossless" audio files. A CD player is just a mini-"computer" which reads the files and interprets them and sends instructions to the receiver/speakers.

While its true that there's more efficient ways to store 80 minutes of losssless audio these days than on a 12 cm plastic disc, lossless audio is lossless audio and computers will have a drive which reads CD-ROM for many-many-many years (its the same drive that reads DVD and BluRay).

So, even if there is talk of people buying CD's less and less, and even if the download community gets their act together and makes lossless downloads standard, you'll always be able to play CD's and they will still sound as good as lossless (because they are).

So, go ahead, keep buying CD's if you like them, they won't become "obsolete" like vinyl or tapes.

Posted on Apr 30, 2012 5:30:52 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 30, 2012 5:33:45 PM PDT
<<So, even if there is talk of people buying CD's less and less, and even if the download community gets their act together and makes lossless downloads standard, you'll always be able to play CD's and they will still sound as good as lossless (because they are). >>
currently,
I have at least a dozen working devices that play cds. this includes dvd and blue ray players, computers and video game consoles.

even if I never bought another working one again, I doubt they are all going to crash in the next 30 or more years of my life.

I tell people If I have to listen to solti's 'ring' on my PS1 in the nursing home. I ain't gonna care that if the nurse changing the disc thinks I'm an anachronism or not.

geezer Jacky"this machine plays 'final fantasy VII' too and the original 'Xenogears''.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 30, 2012 6:00:57 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 30, 2012 6:48:45 PM PDT
DavidRFoss says:
palJacky says:
I ain't gonna care that if the nurse changing the disc thinks I'm an anachronism or not.
-----
Moreover, unlike LP's and tapes, those 14 plastic CDs contain the *same files* as if you had them on your hard drive. If they re-invented digital audio today, they'd probably put the files on a USB stick instead of a plastic disc because it can hold more and its less fragile, but its the same files. This is not a "format change".

Posted on Apr 30, 2012 8:42:54 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 30, 2012 8:45:29 PM PDT
Larkenfield says:
When lossless streaming or downloads become available, listeners will still be able to burn their own discs as backups or to play on any of their disc players. Live streaming can be easily captured with audio recording software such as WireTap Studio for Macs or its PC equivalent.

Posted on May 1, 2012 7:59:45 AM PDT
bejart7092 says:
My biggest problem with downloads is the lack of information regarding performers, dates of recording, or any historical discussion of the works recorded. And often, what information that does exist is just wrong.

We may gripe that some discs come with just the barest minimum of info, but at least they come ith something.

Posted on May 2, 2012 11:19:03 AM PDT
At 0.99 per track, I'll not be likely to replace or get rid of my cds any time soon in order to convert or replace the collection with downloaded tracks of music to replace in any format I already have.

I have been putting music from my cds onto several duplicated SATA HDDs. I stand at about the ninety percent mark there.

Regards to all

Posted on May 2, 2012 11:24:45 AM PDT
Edgar Self says:
The CD is not dead, but collecting them is very, very sick.

Posted on May 2, 2012 3:38:57 PM PDT
Piso:

What then is collecting Downloads?

In reply to an earlier post on May 2, 2012 6:28:09 PM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on May 22, 2012 9:03:21 AM PDT]

Posted on May 2, 2012 6:32:04 PM PDT
KenOC says:
Question: As the market moves away from physical media to downloads, will everything be MP3s? What about people who want lossless files? Will these even be available? Extra cost, maybe?

Posted on May 2, 2012 6:32:29 PM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on May 22, 2012 9:03:21 AM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on May 2, 2012 6:35:56 PM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on May 22, 2012 9:03:22 AM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on May 2, 2012 6:36:03 PM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on May 15, 2012 3:49:58 PM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on May 2, 2012 6:50:54 PM PDT
DavidRFoss says:
march says:
I'd love it if lossless files became more compact. Don't know if that's a pipe dream!
-----------------
The hope is that eventually disc space becomes so cheap and easy-to-get that people don't notice how big lossless files are anymore. Its still a couple of computer-generations away, but getting there. Default bit-rate on downloads has gone up from 128 kbps to 256 kbps. I could see it going to 320 soon from there its not too large a jump to lossless.

If anyone has old photos and videos on your hard drive from ten years ago, its amazing watching them now. Because the image sizes are smaller and the video resolution is much grainier. People text each other higher quality images now than what took tens of minutes to download ten years ago.

The "high-def" lossless audio probably won't be the standard download for a while, though. Mobile devices have all gone to flash memory so the drive sizes have gone backwards a bit. That will correct itself in the long run either with larger flash drives or the mobile devices will stream from a larger home or cloud drive. Probably another 5-10 years on that one. So, keep buying CD's if you like lossless. :-)

In reply to an earlier post on May 2, 2012 7:35:33 PM PDT
Edgar Self says:
Distant Pfrommer -- Collecting downloads? Is that the down-side of uploading?
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Discussion in:  Classical Music forum
Participants:  14
Total posts:  25
Initial post:  Apr 29, 2012
Latest post:  May 2, 2012

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