Customer Discussions > Classical Music forum

>>I can't help noticing how many of the CDs that adopted me and wouldn't let go this year contained performances by orchestras from slightly out-of-the-way places or reputations.<<


Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-12 of 12 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Dec 15, 2012 4:18:30 AM PST
says Fanfare reviewer Steven Kruger in a review of a new Debussy disc with conductor Stephane Denève and the Royal Scottish National Orchestra from Chandos.

Do you agree with him?

And can this also be said of lesser known chamber ensembles, solo artists and labels?

Here is the review I quoted in the thread title:

http://www.fanfaremag.com/content/view/50153/10261/

Posted on Dec 15, 2012 4:41:40 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 15, 2012 4:46:37 AM PST
Mandryka says:
The most imaginative and daring conductors can't hold down positions with big name orchestras. Their ideas are too bold for the sort of audiences that they want to attract. That's what happened in the past to Rosbaud and to Scherchen and Martinon and more recently to Gielen. So it's not surprising that the best performances are often away from the the most prestigious orchestras.

Posted on Dec 15, 2012 4:46:58 AM PST
<<<That's what happened in the past to Rosbaud and to Scherchen and Martinon and more recently to Gielen.>>>>
Horenstein belongs in this category.

Posted on Dec 15, 2012 5:40:37 AM PST
John Spinks says:
About 98% of my Gielen performances are with the SWR or SWF Symphony Orchestras. The other few are with Cincinnati SO on Vox way back. I have never found him to be lacking in any way.

Works in my collection include:
Berg -- 5 Orchestral Songs; Lyric Suite (3 pieces)
Busoni -- Turandot Suite; 2 Studies from Doktar Faust
Carter -- Piano Concerto (with Oppens); Concerto for Orchestra
Bartok -- Concerto for Orchestra; Piano Concerto No. 3 (R. Sherman); Wooden Prince
Beethoven -- Sym. No. 3, "Eroica"; Violin Concerto (Tetzlaff)
Schubert -- Rosamunde, D. 797
Stravinsky -- Sym. in C; Sym. in Three Movements; Sym. of Psalms
Zemlinsky -- Lyrische Symphonie, Op. 18

Posted on Dec 15, 2012 6:48:29 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 15, 2012 6:57:30 AM PST
Mandryka says:
Gielen recorded one of the greatest Missa Solemnis records ever made, with SWR. Same for the Beethoven PC 3 record with Stefan Litwin. The Mahler cycle is not to be sneezed at.

One thing I really enjoyed recently is the Knaben Wunderhorn CD. A bootleg of a Haydn 45 I have shows him to be a very sympathetic Haydnist, and there aren't many sympathetic Haydnists.

Posted on Dec 15, 2012 7:12:15 AM PST
HB says:
I have been promoting a Beethoven 9th for years on this forum by the Budapest Philharmonic and Maestro Rico Saccani. I have yet to generate one response to my recommendation. IMO, it is one of the finest Beethoven 9ths ever recorded. He also recorded superlative accounts of Sibelius No. 1, Tchaikovsky No. 6 and the Liszt A Faust Symphony. I downloaded all of these recordings when I subscribed to Emusic.com. Discovering Saccani was the best thing about my subscription to Emusic.

Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 "Choral"

Classic Masterpieces - Liszt: A Faust Symphony

Sibelius Symphony No 1 & Nielsen Symphony No 3 "Sinfonia Espansiva"

Tchaikovsky: Symphony No. 6 "Pathetique" & Francesca da Rimini

Posted on Dec 15, 2012 9:02:57 AM PST
[Deleted by Amazon on Nov 26, 2013 10:11:57 AM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 15, 2012 11:08:11 AM PST
HB says:
"On the subject of Gielen, I only know his Beethoven Syms. 1, 2 and 3 on DVD. He's an inexpressive, timekeeping conductor and the performances of these pieces were not outstanding. I know his Mahler is highly regarded, but I'm a bit of a skeptic I admit."

March,

I have the entire Gielen set of Beethoven symphonies on DVD. Watching Gielen is pretty tough since his baton technique is very rigid. I have played the DVDs in my garage where I have no TV and I use to music to exercise. The performances sound much more vital when you are not watching Maestro Gielen. I would give the entire set an 8 out of 10. My favorite performance is the 9th where the chorus is really outstanding.

Posted on Dec 15, 2012 12:35:12 PM PST
[Deleted by Amazon on Nov 26, 2013 10:11:57 AM PST]

Posted on Dec 16, 2012 10:05:11 AM PST
DavidRFoss says:
The major orchestras were always a bit on the conservative side when it came around to recordings. Back in the early stereo era (1955-1980) that was great because they had the whole standard repertoire to survey and many of those recordings are still the "reference" recordings for those works. Those recordings still sound great. Its hard for those orchestras to live up to their own legacy. The lesser-known orchestras can more afford to be bold.

Posted on Dec 17, 2012 10:49:23 AM PST
I saw someone say that Nigel Kennedy is now working with lesser orchestras like the Polish Chamber Orchestra, because he can't get the amount of rehearsal time needed to make a good recording/performance with the big orchestras - they simply don't have the time in their schedule - there are bills to pay, so they have to have new engagements all the time.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 17, 2012 7:30:11 PM PST
Yi-Peng says:
The Celibidache version of the Shahrazad suite is one such example. I know that it is an unorthodox version of the Rimsky-Korsakov piece but it had a seductive fairy-tale quality. The slow speeds were at least on the move and it hardly ever sounded perverse.
‹ Previous 1 Next ›
[Add comment]
Add your own message to the discussion
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Prompts for sign-in
 


 

This discussion

Discussion in:  Classical Music forum
Participants:  8
Total posts:  12
Initial post:  Dec 15, 2012
Latest post:  Dec 17, 2012

New! Receive e-mail when new posts are made.

Search Customer Discussions