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brahms piano concertos!


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Initial post: Apr 10, 2012 10:49:01 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 10, 2012 10:49:20 AM PDT
club 7 says:
What are the TOP 5 BEST Recordings?
Let's hear ya!!!!!!!!!!!

Posted on Apr 10, 2012 10:55:18 AM PDT
Gilels/Jochum
Fleischer/Szell
Gelber/Kempe/Decker

Posted on Apr 10, 2012 10:57:11 AM PDT
A very impressive set from Ivan Moravec, Czech Phil, Jiri Belohlavek - a very under-rated conductor in brahms as well, his Serenades are fantastic.

Otherwise, Gilels and Jochum are something rather special as well.

Posted on Apr 10, 2012 10:57:23 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 10, 2012 11:25:15 AM PDT
Edgar Self says:
No. 1 - Rubinstein/Reiner, William Kapell/Mitropoulos, Horowitz/Walter and Toscanini
No. 2 - Marc-Andre Hamelin/Andrew Litton/DSO, Edwin Fischer/Furtwaengler, Elly Ney/Max Fiedler

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 10, 2012 11:25:28 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 10, 2012 11:30:07 AM PDT
club 7 says:
williamkasimer:
nice mention of the gelber recordings.
the 1st won the gran prix du disc and i think it's excellant with depth and scintillating virtuosity and decker does a fine job.
what do you think of decker in particular?
of course kempe was a great brahmsian and shows his stuff too.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 10, 2012 11:29:08 AM PDT
club 7 says:
piso:
i like the rubinstein/reiner recording but it seems like it's very fast compared to gilels/jochum and others but it's a refreshing take and certainly presents Brahms "without the beard". obviously rubinstein and reiner have chemistry.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 10, 2012 11:36:43 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 10, 2012 3:52:36 PM PDT
Edgar Self says:
club 7: I like it too (Rubinstein and Reiner on the First), right from the first plunging orchestral note. Others play it slower, yet it's never occurred to me to think of it as fast ... Rubinstein's first entry, in the wandering minor thirds and sixths, and his "wrong key" entry later on convince me. He and Reiner fought like cats and dogs ... they always fought for some reason ... but the chemistry is certainly there and I'm on the edge of my chair until it's over.

I saw Backhaus play the First, with perfectly synchronised octave trills I've never forgotten. I have, or have heard, many Seconds ... too many ... Pollini, Weissenberg, Guy, Gilels, Freire, Richter, Rubinstein, Horowitz, Serkin, Anda, Richter-Haaser, Schnabel, Kempff, and the Firsts often included with them, but conquered my will-power and just named favorites.

Posted on Apr 10, 2012 11:49:52 AM PDT
General Orc says:
The best I've heard is Gilels/Jochum:

Brahms: Concertos for Piano No. 1 & 2, Fantasia Op. 116

Posted on Apr 10, 2012 11:55:35 AM PDT
MacDoom says:
I'm a great fan of Kovacevich/Sawallisch, with imaginative fillers:
Piano Concertos 1 & 2 / Songs for Alto
Available cheap (if you buy it used).

The piano 4-hand version is available in various excellent performances (Tal&Groethuysen being top of my list Brahms conerto #1 for piano 4-hands) but in this case I much prefer the version with orchestra.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 10, 2012 12:38:36 PM PDT
club 7 says:
macdoom:
kovacevich sawallisch is in my top 3
it rocks

Posted on Apr 10, 2012 12:44:30 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 10, 2012 12:50:32 PM PDT
Mandryka says:
Gelber/Kempe; Serkin/Szell; Richter/Kondrashin; Schuricht/Backhaus/VPO; Gilels/Reiner; Hess/Walter; Freire/Chailly; Kuerti/Rescegno for 2. I don't know anything about 1.

Posted on Apr 10, 2012 12:54:50 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 10, 2012 2:59:40 PM PDT
Larkenfield says:
Arrau/Haitink is a satisfying personal favorite: just the right amount of dramatic tension. ♬

Brahms: Piano Concertos (complete); Overtures (complete); Haydn Variations ~ Arrau

Posted on Apr 10, 2012 1:21:32 PM PDT
#l Serkin/Szell
#2 Backous/Bohm altho the list of other fine recordings is quite long.

Posted on Apr 10, 2012 2:46:10 PM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on May 16, 2012 10:28:39 AM PDT]

Posted on Apr 10, 2012 3:38:11 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 10, 2012 3:41:05 PM PDT
Jeffrey Lee says:
For #1 : Curzon/Szell London Symphony and Serkin/Szell Cleveland Orchestra
For #2 : Serkin/Szell Cleveland Orch. and Gilels/Reiner Chicago Symphony

Posted on Apr 10, 2012 8:12:36 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 10, 2012 8:14:28 PM PDT
1 - Moravec per CCB
2 - I've heard these Richter / Leinsdorf guys are good

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 10, 2012 8:54:19 PM PDT
D. M. Ohara says:
Exactly! My favourites too.

Posted on Apr 10, 2012 8:56:55 PM PDT
David M. says:
Curzon/Szell (1) & Richter/Leinsdorf (2)

Who's the troll down-voting this thread?

Posted on Apr 10, 2012 9:15:32 PM PDT
John Spinks says:
Jochum/Gilels
Chailly/Freire
Marturet/Lechner

Posted on Apr 10, 2012 10:42:30 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 11, 2012 10:34:40 AM PDT
So many ways at looking at these works. Here's a few that remain vital to me:

1+2 Arrau/Rozhdestvensky (Doremi) Moscow 1968
1 - Solomon/Jochum/Berlin Phil 1954 though Schnabel/Szell is still wonderful in this work.
2 - Serkin/Ormandy/Philadelphia 1956

I also like John Ogdon/Stokowski in the 3rd Mvmt. of the 1st.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 11, 2012 12:08:32 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 11, 2012 1:33:05 AM PDT
D. M. Ohara says:
Lark,
According to the timings on the Amazon download site, Arrau and Haitink take 61'47" over the first concerto, and 55'21" over the second. That seems very slow. I even find Barenboim too slow; and he takes just over 51 minutes in the first concerto and just over 50 in the second. Rubinstein takes just 46 and 47 minutes respectively. Neither concerto should take much more than 50 minutes; and many excellent versions take several minutes less.

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 11, 2012 12:11:31 AM PDT
Yi-Peng says:
Is it ok to mention Zimerman/Bernstein and Frere/Chailly?

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 11, 2012 5:13:13 AM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on May 16, 2012 10:28:01 AM PDT]

Posted on Apr 11, 2012 5:41:03 AM PDT
It's Wagner's ghost voting down the Brahms thread !

And D. M. - should speed really equal excellence ? I personally don't believe so. But there IS a fine line between dramatic and boring...

In reply to an earlier post on Apr 11, 2012 5:45:29 AM PDT
MZ - I am glad I am not the only one who admires Moravec's set. Listening to the First now; fabulous! If you can get hold of them though, do try the Brahms Serenades that Belohlavek did on Supraphon around five years later; and indeed Belohlavek's Brahms Symphonies. As admirable as Ivan Moravec is in these works, it's as much about the considered accompaniment; a similar comment could easily be made with Paul Lewis' recent Beethoven set...
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Discussion in:  Classical Music forum
Participants:  21
Total posts:  42
Initial post:  Apr 10, 2012
Latest post:  Apr 12, 2012

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