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Quiz time!


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Initial post: Oct 22, 2011 4:46:35 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 22, 2011 4:58:52 PM PDT
KenOC says:
Ask a question in this thread. Rule: You gotta know the answer. Not a rule but the honorable thing to do: If you can give the answer, ask a question of your own.

Softball question: Who wrote the first tuba concerto? In the repertoire, anyway...

Posted on Oct 22, 2011 4:59:48 PM PDT
Would that be Mr. Vaughan Williams? Unless there is an earlier one I don't know about...

OK, here's a really nasty one that we were once asked as a bonus question on a college exam:

What opus number of a piano trio by a famous composer, when squared, will give you the opus number of a violin concerto by another famous composer?

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 22, 2011 5:04:30 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 22, 2011 5:19:08 PM PDT
KenOC says:
Radames, you got it!

Now about your question. Easy. It's...hmmmm...my head aches...got it! Brahms' Piano Trio Nr. 1 Op. 8 and Mendelssohn's Violin Concerto Op. 64. Right?

Question: What living and active composer has written (so far) the same number of symphonies as Shostakovich? His name is like an exclamation of surprised discovery, mispronounced.

Posted on Oct 22, 2011 5:18:53 PM PDT
Right, my dear scholar!

Here's another one: What famous oratorio chorus does Bernard Herrmann subtly quote, snarkily and with deliberate wrong notes, in his score to "Citizen Kane" to presage Kane's ethical downfall?

Posted on Oct 22, 2011 5:20:41 PM PDT
KenOC says:
OK, two questions out there. I'm retiring for a bit to take an aspirin after that last one.

Posted on Oct 22, 2011 6:05:16 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 22, 2011 6:07:31 PM PDT
I haven't seen citizen kane in years. 'subtle quote' is something I can't remember.

odd guess has to be 'hallaluhah chorus'

so no question from me even if it is right.
I just think this is a good opening to show off my bit of knowledge.
the most interesting classical music 'trivia' coming out of 'citizen kane' has to be the fact that the 'insipid' aria written for Kane's dreadful wife.
Has actually been recorded by KIRI.Kiri! Her Greatest Hits Live

Posted on Oct 22, 2011 6:30:17 PM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on May 17, 2012 2:22:32 PM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 22, 2011 6:41:17 PM PDT
KenOC says:
March, it is -- indeed -- Aho! OK, gotta work on your question...

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 22, 2011 6:52:38 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 22, 2011 6:53:03 PM PDT
KenOC says:
March -- the charmed opus number is 77. Haydn Quartets, Dvorak Quintet, Brahms and Shostakovich violin concerti.

Posted on Oct 22, 2011 6:57:20 PM PDT
I was narrowing in to 77, got to prokofiev's incidental music for 'Hamlet' and thought I was heading in the wrong direction.

Posted on Oct 22, 2011 6:57:27 PM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on May 17, 2012 2:22:29 PM PDT]

Posted on Oct 22, 2011 7:00:18 PM PDT
OK, still waiting for a "Kane" answer. In the meantime...

Contrary to popular belief, "The Nutcracker" was not the first work by Tchaikovsky (or anyone else) in which the then-newly-invented celesta was used. What was the work?

Posted on Oct 22, 2011 7:00:41 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 22, 2011 7:07:37 PM PDT
difference of two squares would have been a good one
81-4 = (9-2)x(9+2)
well good for us math geeks.

Posted on Oct 22, 2011 7:06:17 PM PDT
KenOC says:
I owe a question too. What composer's name incorporates a brand of motorcar with three syllables? (softball question)

Posted on Oct 22, 2011 7:12:05 PM PDT
Wolf-Ferrari (I hope!).

Then there that Hindemith opera, "Cadillac"...oh, wait, that's "Cardillac"...

Posted on Oct 22, 2011 7:13:10 PM PDT
K. Ramba says:
Ken, i think i got it: Beetho-Van

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 22, 2011 7:16:00 PM PDT
KenOC says:
Radames is, of course, correct. K Frese gets a chuckle though.

Radames has the only two questions outstanding!

Posted on Oct 22, 2011 7:17:22 PM PDT
Ah...but would that they were outstanding questions...

Posted on Oct 22, 2011 7:28:02 PM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on May 17, 2012 2:22:24 PM PDT]

Posted on Oct 22, 2011 7:32:37 PM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on May 17, 2012 2:22:20 PM PDT]

Posted on Oct 22, 2011 7:35:29 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 22, 2011 7:36:45 PM PDT
I'm jumping in on shostakovich, just because I know his last quartet is op 144.
and that is a perfect square.just need to verify that his first Piano sonata is op 12.

Posted on Oct 22, 2011 7:38:21 PM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on May 17, 2012 2:22:16 PM PDT]

Posted on Oct 22, 2011 7:40:20 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 22, 2011 7:45:20 PM PDT
brahms sextets are op. 18 and 36. I think that answers the second
question.
What made it easier is that the conditions require the number of musicians to be even. hence trios and quintets were able to be thrown out.
there are only a handful of sextets and octets and so I checked those before hitting the quartets.

Posted on Oct 22, 2011 7:41:40 PM PDT
K. Ramba says:
And finally: What wind quintett has an opus number that, when multiplicated with the date of it's composer's birthday, divided through the number of teeth he had left when he composed a quartet with an opus number which when squared, minced and smoked in a pipe... aaaaahm, let me think about my question again...

Posted on Oct 22, 2011 7:45:47 PM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on May 17, 2012 2:22:07 PM PDT]
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Discussion in:  Classical Music forum
Participants:  27
Total posts:  585
Initial post:  Oct 22, 2011
Latest post:  Aug 20, 2014

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