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If you could have anyone write your favorite characters...


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Initial post: May 28, 2012 9:13:11 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 28, 2012 9:18:59 PM PDT
Who would you want?

James Ellroy to do Batman. I would say Mickey Spilane but Miller already has chanelled him so much in his work.
Ian Flemming to do Nick Fury
Walt Whitman to do Captain America
Toni Morrison to do Storm
James Baldwin to do Luke Cage
Fyodor Dosteyski to do the Punisher.
Mark Twain to do Power Pack
Christopher Marlowe or John Milton to do Ghost Rider, Hellblazer, Hellstorm, etc.
Homer to do Wonder Woman
George Orwell to do Civil War
William S. Burroughs to do Shade the Changing Man
Sylvia Plath to do Death
Friedrich Nietsche to do Superman or would that be to obvious?
Franz Kafka to do Blue Beetle
J.R.R. Tolkien to do Green Lantern
Anne Rice or Stephanie Meyer to do I Vampire or Morbius
Alexandre Dumas to do Batroc
Iris Murdoch to do Daredevil
Albert Camus to do the Phantom Stranger
Larry McMurtry or Zane Grey to do the Two Gun Kid
Ernest Hemmingway to do Wildcat

Posted on Jun 5, 2012 10:21:11 PM PDT
Forgot Philip K. Dick to do Mysterio, Mastermind, and Deathlok
Jack London to do Wolverine
Leo Tolstoy to do War Machine
Hunter S. Thompson to do Lobo

Posted on Jun 6, 2012 10:21:16 AM PDT
W.T. says:
I remember back in the nineties when Isaac Asimov wrote a Batman story (actually, one of his "Black Widowers" mystery stories with a version of Bruce Wayne/Batman guest-starring). It was a surreal trip, but fun in a tongue-in-cheek way. It left me a tad disappointed because I figured teaming a writer known for logic and analysis to the nth degree (the classic sci-fi mysteries of Lige Bailey and R. Daneel Olivaw) with the world's greatest detective would produce a story worthy of Sherlock Holmes' best, but Asimov went in a more lighthearted direction with it. His heart just wasn't in it, and I don't think he took the project all that seriously.

Posted on Jun 6, 2012 8:03:11 PM PDT
Maybe Asimov would have done a better job with the Metal Men or Magnus Robot Fighter? I haven't read that. I read a Harlan Elison written issue of Daredevil that was pretty good but he had a co-writer. Stephen King has written a few issues of comics over the years. But The Dark Tower series is the only one I've read and that's co-written with Robin Furth and scripted by Peter David. Larry Niven wrote a Green Lantern graphic novel called Ganthet's Tale illustrated by John Byrne. Alfred Bester author of classic sf novels Stars My Destination and The Demolished Man used to write comics in the 50's. There was a comic version of 2001: A Space Odyssey by Jack Kirby but neither Arthur C. Clarke nor Stanley Kubrick were involved.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 7, 2012 5:36:32 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 7, 2012 5:38:29 AM PDT
W.T. says:
I had forgotten about Ganthet's Tale. Niven writing that was a big deal at the time.

Edmond Hamilton, who is co-recredited (alongside EE "Doc" Smith) with creating the entire genre of space opera in the 1930's, moved into comics after the market for pulpy space opera dried up in the fifties. He wrote a ton of Superman, Batman and World's Finest stories. He wrote what I consider the best Superman story ever for Action Comics # 300, where Superman is time travels to the far future and becomes trapped because Earth's sun has cooled and expanded into a red giant. He also wrote most of the better silver-age Legion of Super-Heroes stories, establishing the bulk of the sci-fi elements of the teams' mythos.

Posted on Jun 7, 2012 4:54:41 PM PDT
Interesting. I'm not familiar with Hamilton but I'll look him up. I've read about EE Doc Smith and the Lensmen. Big influence on the Green Lantern Corp. Niven also wrote a "bible" for the Green Lantern mythos but DC apparently got cold feet about using it. Maybe Ganthet's Tale was a byproduct of the work he put into that. Jack Kirby's Forth World may have been a major inspiration for Star Wars along with Doctor Doom influencing Vader.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 8, 2012 5:36:52 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jun 8, 2012 5:37:05 AM PDT
W.T. says:
Also, I believe that Timothy Zahn wrote a "Star-Lord" mini for Marvel, though I don't think it was particularly successful as comics were going through a rough period at the time.

Posted on Jun 9, 2012 7:11:23 PM PDT
Having Orson Scot Card write Ultimate Iron Man didn't go over well at all. But I only like Ender's Game and Speaker For the Dead out all his output.

Posted on Jun 15, 2012 1:21:58 PM PDT
Gmon says:
Gail Simone on Stature
Grant Morrison on Ant man
Frank miller on Power girl/ psylocke
John Hickman on Superman

Posted on Jun 18, 2012 12:11:54 PM PDT
MAR2D2 says:
Neil Gaiman the continuation of Sandman.
Chris Ware on Punisher.
Crumb on Spiderman.
Art Spiegelman on X-men.
Garth Ennis on Jimmy Corrigan.
Alan Moore on Thanos.
Dan Clowes on an ongoing Rocky 100.000 BC series.
James Cameron on Alien 3.
Jim Shooter on all old Valiant characters.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 18, 2012 11:32:12 PM PDT
Nicos says:
The Crumb on Spider-Man... that made me remember there was this one-shot or miniseries by Peter Bagge:The Megalomaniacal Spider-man (Startling Stories) I never got to read it but I think this is as close as we are ever going to get to an R. Crumb penned Spider-Man.

Posted on Jun 19, 2012 8:37:18 AM PDT
you guys should check out the spiderman book jim butcher wrote, he captured peter parker perfectly and created an original and engaging story with him. seriously worth the read

Posted on Jun 19, 2012 2:29:03 PM PDT
MAR2D2 says:
Yeah, Crumb really needs to expand his horizons.

Posted on Jun 20, 2012 10:23:28 PM PDT
Art Spiegelman could certainly bring a lot of emotional realism to Magneto's background and Kitty Pryde's family.
Alan Moore could be interesting on Thanos but I would rather see Thanos finally consummate his love for Death with the Sandman Death in a story written by Gaiman.
R Crumb on Spider-Man. Only if it took place in the late 60's with Spidey fighting Electro (zap!) while tripping on acid. With the Vulture getting it on with an ostrich lady in the background.

Posted on Jul 8, 2012 1:03:38 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 8, 2012 1:13:49 AM PDT
What if you could have any artist of all time draw any character?
Leonardo's sketch of a bat shaped glider helped inspire Batman. Miller paid tribute to that in Batman Year 1. Plus Vertigo did a mini-series about him in the 90's called Chiaroscuro: The Lives of Leonardo Da Vinci. The Mona Lisa showed up in a Grendel Tales miniseries Four Devils One Hell.
Michaelangelo should do the creation of Adam Warlock. His statue of David was shown in Chiaroscuro and homaged in a Dave McKean Miracleman cover.
Botticelli did the Birth of Venus so he already has Greco-Roman mythos experience. Let him do Wonder Woman, Ares, Son of Vulcan.
Hieronymous Bosch had such a great talent for depicting hell, I could see him doing Hellblazer, Hellstorm, Spawn, etc.
Norman Rockwell could really bring Smallville to life or Captain America.
Andy Warhol has already showed up in Neil Gaiman's run of Miracleman as a cyborg clone and Warren Ellis Druid miniseries as a ghost.
William Blake shows up in Alan Moore's work all the time either directly as in From Hell or in homage in Watchmen. Plus his Tyger Tiger poem was quoted in lots of 80's comics.
Picasso, Dali, and Jackson Pollack could do covers for Doom Patrol.
Van Gogh I could see him doing Swamp Thing or Black Orchid. Many of the Impressionists would be great for Black Ochid and Poison Ivy.
Rembrandt Alan Moore's second issue of Swamp Thing the Anatomy Lesson borrowed it's title from Rembrandt's painting of an autopsy. He would have been a great cover artist.
Goya was also referenced in Moore's run on Swamp Thing. He would have been a great horror comic artist. Or a political protest comic artist.

Posted on Jul 8, 2012 8:26:10 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 8, 2012 8:27:17 AM PDT
Cerberus says:
Richard Morgan to do Batman
Dan Abnett to do Justice League
H. P. Lovecraft to do Justice League Dark

Posted on Jul 13, 2012 2:51:58 PM PDT
Jason Wood says:
Robert E. Howard on Conan (one can dream, can't he?)
Edgar Rice Burroughs on Superman (John Carter, anyone?)
Jules Verne on Batman
H.G. Wells on Adam Strange
Mark Twain on Groo
Stephen King on Thor (The Eyes of the Dragon)

Posted on Jul 14, 2012 1:38:07 AM PDT
Interesting...A lot of the Dark Horse Conan is directly adapted from Howard isn't it? There was one issue of Superman where they paid homage to John Carter on the cover. I think it said Superman Warlord of Mars and had Superman holding a uplifted sword and riding a martian steed. Verne would be great for Batman's gadgets but I'd want Poe or Arthur Conan Doyle to come up with a mystery for him to solve. Stephen King doing Thor... I could see a team up between Thor and Roland that would help advance Roland's quest for the Tower. Maybe Thor could lead an assault on Thunderclap?

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 16, 2012 6:32:12 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Jul 16, 2012 6:34:38 AM PDT
Jason Wood says:
I've read every single Dark Horse Conan and they are great and based directly on the works of Howard. But the brilliant way that Robert E. Howard wrote Conan was absolutely incredible and cannot be fully captured in comic book form. In my opinion, after reading most of the classic authors from Twain to Steinbeck, Howard wrote Conan as well as any of the classic authors wrote their novels. His were by far the most skillfully written and most exciting pulp stories ever, on par with any of the classics.

Although not quite as exciting or skillfully written as Howard, Burroughs did a great job on Tarzan and John Carter who are great and classic action heroes. Hence my choice for him to write Superman.

Maybe Poe or Doyle could have come up with a better mystery than Verne for Batman, but the gadgets and action sequences would have paled compared to what Verne could have written. I still think of "Journey to the Center of the Earth" as one of the greatest adventures of all time.

H.G. Wells, author of "War of the Worlds" and "The Invisible Man" is a natural for the outerworldly science fiction stories of Adam Strange.

I consider Mark Twain the wittiest man who ever lived, with Will Rogers a close second, and Groucho Marx a close third. I think his take on Groo would be hilarious.

If you or anyone else has not read "The Eyes of the Dragon" by Stephen King, I cannot recommend it enough. King changed his whole writing style to write this novel. It's a medieval fantasy worthy of "The Lord of the Rings." I think King could write a heck of a Thor story.

Posted on Jul 16, 2012 6:57:04 AM PDT
S. Kelly says:
David Lynch on Moon Knight
Quentin Tarrantino on Fables
Jack Kerouac on Micronauts
Akira Kurasawa on Avengers
Francis Ford Coppola on Alien Legion
Michael Mann on Justice League
(I think I've slipped into writer/directors...)

Posted on Jul 16, 2012 5:18:11 PM PDT
Helen Keller to do Daredevil with Clarence Darrow to write the trial scenes.
Poe to do John Constantine
Plato to do Aquaman/Namor

Posted on Jul 21, 2012 3:01:45 AM PDT
Jesse Willey says:
Miguel Cervantes on Shining Knight
Kurt Vonnegut on House of Secrets
Rod Serling on House of Mystery
J.M. DeMatteis and Keith Giffen on Wolverine and The X-Men along with DC's Vertigo comedy hit: ' 'Sugar and Spike: The College Years'
Sergio Aragones (as plotter/co-writer), Mark Evanier (co-writer) on Batlash with art by Walter Simonson
Aaron Sorkin on The X-Men
Stephen King on The Spectre

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 21, 2012 4:14:25 PM PDT
Great suggestions. Aaron Sorkin might be a good fit for X-Men but I kind of see him doing Ex Machina or Prez. But since he started doing the Newsroom he could be great for journalist superheroes like Superman, Spider-Man, The Question etc.

Posted on Jul 25, 2012 1:32:58 PM PDT
Jesse Willey says:
Actually-- Sorkin already wrote Prez. While everything he does has a certain flavor he doesn't like repeating himself. (Newsroom has some elements of Sports Night and Studio 60 but they are handled in a different manner.) So as for Prez-- Giffen and Dematteis. Then again-- I'd put them on almost anything. Those guys crack me up. Sorkin would get the political aspects of the X-Men down pat. It would really depend on his team line up. I would love to see what he do with Kitty. (Since she is the closest thing the mutant have to well adjusted, I could almost see her running the Pro-Mutant lobby.)

Posted on Oct 12, 2012 10:59:57 AM PDT
Hi Danny (assuming you're still following this thread), I just wanted to let you know most of your author-character choices are brilliant. I especially love Homer-Wonder Woman and Dostoevsky-Punisher. It would be fantastic to see what they would do with those characters.

IMO, Nietzsche would be a bad choice to write Superman. A big part of what makes Superman interesting is the irony that in so many ways he fits the mold of Nietzsche's ubermensch (being a physical and mental paragon), and yet he steadfastly refuses to fill that role. He doesn't go conquering worlds or trying to redefine society's supposedly arbitrary notions of morality; he defends those weaker than himself, believes to the depths of his soul that truth, justice, and compassion are concrete realities, and at the end of the day chooses to put on a pair of glasses and lives as an ordinary man with ordinary friendships. He represents the notion that those with power have an obligation to the weak, not vice versa. In contrast, the story's poster child for Nietzscheism is the villlain Lex Luthor, who sees himself as Earth's rightful ubermensch and hates Superman because he considers him a competitor for the position. Now Nietzsche writing Lex would be interesting!

Getting back to the thread's question...
*Well, I'd be curious to see what Virgil would do with Wonder Woman, too.
*Ray Bradbury on Superman would have been wonderful. It's almost surprising it never happened.
*Douglas Adams on Green Lantern
*John Varley on The Fantastic Four
*William Shakespeare on The Mighty Thor
*Aldous Huxley on Magnus, Robot Fighter
*Neil Gaiman on Spider-Woman (Jessica Drew)
*Charles Dickens on The Phantom Stranger. Dickens liked spooky stuff.
*Harlan Ellison on OMAC (the original version)
*Osamu Tezuka (Astro Boy) on Machine Man
*Alan Dean Foster on The Starjammers or The Micronauts
*Akira Kurosawa on The Immortal Iron Fist
*Bill Watterson on Power Pack
*Bill Mantlo on The Transformers
*Edgar Rice Burroughs on Adam Strange
*Leo Tolstoy on The Legion of Super-Heroes
*George R.R. Martin on X-Men (he did WildCards, after all)
*Lauren Faust (My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic) on Amethyst Princess of Gemworld
*Franz Kafka on The Incredible Hulk
*Gary Larson on Tales of the Bizarro World
*William Gibson on Spider-Man 2099
*Max Brooks on Marvel Zombies
*Tom Clancy on G.I. Joe
*Max Allan Collins on Batman
*Chester Gould on Savage Dragon (back when the Dragon was a cop) Think how much fun Gould had with Dick Tracy's "Moon Period" and his disappointment that the audience wanted him to get back to regular police stuff. I've always had mixed feelings about Erik Larsen's Savage Dragon and I'd be curious to see what another writer might do with him.
*J.R.R. Tolkien on ElfQuest

And yeah Jason, Mark Twain and Groo would be perfect for each other!
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Discussion in:  Comics forum
Participants:  13
Total posts:  34
Initial post:  May 28, 2012
Latest post:  Jun 7, 2013

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