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Do people still cook with lard


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Showing 226-250 of 481 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 7:10:15 PM PST
Cloud says:
you're right eg a lb of lead is the same as a lb of feathers! i suppose the /tblsp diff is minimal (butter only 102 calories but 7.3 g of sat fat vs grapeseed at 120 calories/1.3.g saturated fat) while the other ldl, vitamin, saturated, monosat and other nutritional factors vary. that's what so complicated for my simple non-scientific mind!

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2012 7:37:49 PM PST
ace™ says:
"you're right eg a lb of lead is the same as a lb of feathers!" ◄ cloud

exactly!

and, as i said before, butter is only 102 because it contains water, whereas veg oils do not.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 3, 2012 12:00:10 AM PST
Recipe Diva says:
What I need to do is get those wrappers and make some of my mom's wontons. So good.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 3, 2012 6:21:39 AM PST
Lynetta Anne says:
Jeri -Embarrassing to hear that Borlaug said/implied that there is no difference between selective breeding and GMO. I guess the science education in this country is worse than I thought. Most scientists agree that there's an extreme difference - in fact, the FDA's own scientists recommended AGAINST approving GMO. I'll drop this for fear of turning a recipe corner into a political diatribe, but it's a little like climate change. The actual discussion of the science gets drowned out by the politics.
As far as labor intensive - not so bad. I could do 5-10 pigs with the same labor, but haven't the feed resources for them. This works best combined w/ a dairy, or in partnership with one. Once you "teach them to eat" to get them to come to you and they understand that you're opening up new pasture for them everyday, they're eager to move into the new space, not to get away. No dogs. Takes abt. 30-45 min. to move their shed, provide water, feed supplements (whey etc.) and set the new fencing. Meanwhile it ensures that I'm out there with them, observing, making sure everything is going right. Keeps them tamer, too. This summer will be using them this summer to root out a couple of rows of fruit trees the former owners planted too close to the fence. That would take me a lot of hours of labor to do, and they'll enjoy it. I'd rather string fencing than root out trees any day.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 3, 2012 6:52:20 AM PST
curious cook says:
Hi Claire. I have certainly had some great biscuits made with Crisco. I feel lucky to get locally rendered pig fat, and it makes wonderful biscuits as well. I don't think there is only one way to produce just about any food. The only hard and fast rule I have is moderation in all things, which, alas, means not very many biscuits in my diet...

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 3, 2012 10:12:16 AM PST
Recipe Diva says:
Thanks for piping up Lynetta Anne, on the diff. between selective breeding and GMO. I almost said something myself.

It is interesting reading about your animal husbandry. Of course, when it gets to rooting out trees and stringing fence, well, that just makes my back spasm thinking about it.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 3, 2012 11:49:36 AM PST
Lynetta Anne says:
and thank YOU, Diva, for the support. Yeah, I'm 60 and rooting out trees is a non-starter. But pigs are good at it. I think of my pigs and chickens as my ground crew. When I add sheep I'll have all the jobs I hate covered, LOL! But as a foodie all of my life, and a farmer only for the last 5, I want my ground crew to taste good when it's time to send them to freezer camp!

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 3, 2012 12:03:22 PM PST
Recipe Diva says:
Lynetta Anne, I had Romney sheep for about 8 years or so on my small patch. I wanted them for the wool, not the meat, but I digress. Had a lot of poison oak on my hill slope and they sure got rid of that for me. We had tried and tried to get rid of it in other ways and at great expense but it always came back. The sheep have been gone now for a few years. the poison oak never came back... GOOD WORKERS!

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 3, 2012 12:11:29 PM PST
Waves says:
Those sheep wore signs that said "We will work for food".

Do any of you know of any charts or websites that contain a comprehensive listing of nutrients, vitamins, for the various types of fat etc.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 3, 2012 12:14:33 PM PST
Recipe Diva says:
Really, they wore little jackets to keep their fleece clean. Lol. Spinners hate dirty fleece. Sorry I can't help with the other question.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 3, 2012 12:20:06 PM PST
Recipe Diva says:
Freezer Camp! Lol. I love it. You are FUNNY, Lynetta Anne. Five years, huh? You mean there is still time for me to get the 'farm'? Problem is, now that I can afford the patch of land in this economy, this body can no longer deal with the physical abuse. sigh...

Posted on Jan 3, 2012 12:53:05 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 3, 2012 1:38:00 PM PST
NYBill says:
When I was a kid in the 40's and 50's, all deep frying was done in lard. In our neighborhood we had a number of fish markets that sold french fries made of REAL potatoes (peeled and cut in the store!) cooked in lard.
When I was a toddler, my Mother worked as a waitress in an Italian restaurant (Checkered tablecloths and wine bottle candle holders and all) and one of my favorite memories, the chef would make some french fries to check the temp of the lard...when cooked, he put the FF in a cone made of newspaper; they were the best FFs I ever ate.
Yes, Virginia, food for a child in a newspaper cone!!! OMG,OMG. The sky is falling...did I mention that I am almost 70 going on 30???

The bakeries also used lard in cooking their jelly doughnuts and other fried pastries and pie crusts. You cannot get the same texture and flavor with butter, oil or it's step-child, margerine. Ugh.

You could buy lard in cans as Crisco and Spry as well as (Beef, Pork, Chicken, Goose and duck) in one pound packages in most any store and butcher shop or just borrow some from a neighbor.

Fish Fry and French Fries on Friday; Fried chicken on Sunday with a jelly doughnut or fruit pie desert...Heaven on Earth.
The draw back is when the food gets cold the lard solidifies and is not very appetizing.
Of course,the lard consumption needed to be cut back, but like most things of late, people, especially the self appointed food police, get hysterical and go off into extremes.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 3, 2012 1:05:14 PM PST
NYBill says:
This is just one of many sources for lard shop around as well as locally.
https://www.prairiepridepork.com/links.php

Open Kettle Rendured Leaf Lard, READY to use!
4 lbs 0 oz
41.45
Open Kettle Rendured Leaf Lard, Ready to Use, 2 LBS
2 lbs 0 oz
22.75

Open Kettle Rendured Leaf Lard, Ready to Use, 2 LBS

2 lbs 0 oz

22.75

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 3, 2012 1:10:45 PM PST
Recipe Diva says:
GOOD HEAVENS !!! That is way expensive. I get a pound container from the butcher back east for about $2.75, and it is fresh leaf lard. Lucky me!

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 3, 2012 1:16:58 PM PST
Recipe Diva says:
Wow, just checked out this pork site Nybill, and see that they tack on $21.95 for shipping up to 6 lbs. So 2 lbs. of lard is going to cost me $44.70? In their dreams...

Posted on Jan 3, 2012 1:19:04 PM PST
NYBill says:
Most people don't know that the fluffy "creme" filling in the majority of commercially sold cakes and patries consists of whipped LARD, powdered sugar and flavorings.
It's also used to replace butter in butter-cream frostings,which would go rancid without refrigeration.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 3, 2012 1:43:50 PM PST
NYBill says:
I know...I wouldn't pay those prices for Filet. I was just trying to help...that was the first site I came on. I live in Manhattan, NYC and I can get all the lard I need at, I assume a more reasonable price without turning my apt into a rendering plant as suggested by another poster.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 3, 2012 1:55:53 PM PST
Recipe Diva says:
That's okay Nybill. Didn't mean to freak out. I just did some looking out here in my neck of the woods, Sonoma county. They're charging just as much, if not more, per pound for Berkshire pork here. But that appears to be because of press hype. I swear, it makes me want to raise up my own weaner piggy.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 3, 2012 1:58:56 PM PST
Recipe Diva says:
I spend half of my life in southern Ontario, Canada. Not too far from you. I sure like the fact that there are still real butchers there. Not so much out here in the west.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 3, 2012 2:10:08 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 3, 2012 2:12:38 PM PST
Jeri K. says:
Lynetta....I couldn't agree more that GMO is a political football at the very least. Mr. Borlaug's conclusion about GMO is easily researched for anyone interested.
Good luck as you continue and progress in your endeavor. I applaud you in setting a fine example of work ethic and doing something that is healthy, good for the environment and close to nature.
Cheers for a prosperous 2012.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 3, 2012 2:26:03 PM PST
Lynetta Anne says:
Diva, thanks for that info, I'll put Romney sheep in my list to research. I do like critters that earn their keep by doing what they love!
Re: farming -one of the things I expect - and get - from my farm is exercise. After 30 years in a desk job I started gently, working 1-2 hrs/day and I'm still careful not to overdo - recovery takes too long. Now, at 60, I can lift (not pitch!) a 50 pound hay bale or feed bag. I studied ag intensely before I took the plunge, conventional ag was never a consideration - you need to be big, own a lot of steel and sell to a middleman. Its a rough transition, but I'm loving it. My animals pay their way and improve the land, my orchard is beginning to produce again... no chemicals, just kaolin clay, compost tea and raw milk. Guinea fowl help control the bugs, chickens and pigs to plow and cultivate the ground. Pigs cleanup the orchard of June drops and end of season drops - saving me all of the stoop labor and getting yummier with every bite. Confirmed a source for Java chickens next spring - they're on the Arc of Taste. My animals are all workers as well as food. Can't eat a tractor. I hate mowing and love lamb, so sheep are next.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 3, 2012 2:27:20 PM PST
Lynetta Anne says:
Thank you, Jeri!

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 3, 2012 2:47:26 PM PST
Recipe Diva says:
Romney sheep are a good breed here in the PNW, but I don't know about eating them. There may be other better breeds for that. But for my purposes their wool fleece was excellent for my weaving. I weave complex Navajo style rugs, and spin the wool for that.
More power to ya in your endeavors, Lynetta. And a very prosperous New Year to you.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 3, 2012 2:51:56 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 3, 2012 2:52:28 PM PST
Recipe Diva says:
What part of the US are you in, Lynetta? Or should I not ask?

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 3, 2012 4:06:33 PM PST
Lynetta Anne says:
Diva - farming in southwest MI. Cold today.
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