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Do people still cook with lard


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Showing 426-450 of 481 posts in this discussion
In reply to an earlier post on Jan 14, 2012 8:23:25 PM PST
Recipe Diva says:
I have, Lynetta, made bread with olive oil. I love olive oil and use it often, and if I was making a fougasse or pizza dough, olive oil is king. But I often make sandwich bread, and we are not big bread eaters, and I find that the bread with lard stays fresher longer and has a little different texture.

Posted on Jan 14, 2012 9:50:23 PM PST
irishmary24 says:
Lard- whether it's good or bad depends on how "processed" it is. Rendered lard alone is not "bad" for you, but if it is HYDROGENATED- as with ANYTHING- it is not good for a living thing to eat it. Food "manufacturers" that hydrogenate the fat in anything has manufactured something that will harm your body. Food in it's unprocessed state, or as near to it's original state, is better for you.

Posted on Jan 15, 2012 2:26:56 AM PST
Lynetta Anne says:
Thanks Diva, that's interesting - I'll have to try that. I'm not a big bread eater either - love it, but I do better if I minimize wheat, so I don't make it often. Will try this in the next few days and see how it goes.

Irishmary - yep, I think most of us lard eaters appear to focus on unprocessed, homemade, and pasture-raised. Worth noting that apparently pigs, like us, manufacture vitamin D in the presence of sunshine, and store it in fat. If they're kept outside instead of in confinement barns, there is more D in the lard. Yet another reason to buy pastured and render it yourself.

Posted on Jan 21, 2012 6:08:08 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 21, 2012 6:08:28 PM PST
Bundtlust says:
Most of the H-E-B grocery stores in my area carry an entire AISLE of lard...or at least a ten-foot section or so.

As a baker, I've heard it sworn time and time again that lard produces a flakier pie crust (the most common refrigerated pie crusts, Pillsbury, include partially hydrogenated lard).

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 23, 2012 5:38:41 PM PST
QBraly says:
I couldn't agree more. And lard is best for pie crusts, biscuits, tortillas.

Your suggestion about moderation is a good point too.

Posted on Jan 23, 2012 7:20:25 PM PST
Country Girl says:
My angel of a grandma always used lard for her pie crusts and they were out of this world good, flakiest ever, never tough or doughy. The in laws by marriage have a family recipe for holiday shortbread-type cookies from the Southwest called biscochos or biscochitos that also use lard. But it's worth the effort to get it at the organic store, folks.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 23, 2012 8:34:18 PM PST
"The in laws by marriage have a family recipe for holiday shortbread-type cookies from the Southwest called biscochos or biscochitos that also use lard"

Can yo post this MOST YUMMY-SOUNDING recipe????

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 23, 2012 9:21:18 PM PST
ace™ says:
YES! i would like the recipe, too... if country girl can get her hands on it (family secret?) and wishes to share it...

my daughter will be raising pigs for us in the spring... i'll have THE BEST lard ANYWHERE! (and, i'm going to ask her for the lard from HER pig, if she doesn't want it....)

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 23, 2012 11:04:50 PM PST
Recipe Diva says:
Wish I had space to raise up a piglet or two.

Posted on Dec 12, 2012 10:07:34 AM PST
Kathy Edens says:
My mother makes the best pies and only uses lard for the crust.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 14, 2012 1:12:38 PM PST
Recipe Diva says:
You can get the recipe on youtube.

Posted on Dec 14, 2012 2:52:01 PM PST
SilentCal says:
Would you post a link to the best one, please?

Posted on Dec 14, 2012 3:12:42 PM PST
stevign says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Dec 15, 2012 11:11:17 PM PST
Pearl Bates says:
It is the processing... most lard in hydrogenated and = transfats = clogged arteries.
I have some lard that is not hydrogenated. It is a natural food, like butter and your body knows what to do with it. Canola and Soy are processed in such a way that your body becomes confused, does not understand how to use it... not so good. Fortunately Cuisinart makes an incredible stick blender and I make mayonnaise in about 4 minutes... 3 to dump the ingredients into the handy mixing cup and less than a minute to blend. Sunflower oil and egg... not much to worry about with them.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 15, 2012 11:24:31 PM PST
Pearl Bates says:
My mother in law used rendered bear fat... oh my! so tender so light!

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 15, 2012 11:28:08 PM PST
Pearl Bates says:
Me too... our government allows so much trans fat before labeling is required.
My favorite Jiffy corn muffin mix has trans fats... and they admit it at the website... but not in an amount that must be put on the label. Like lead in slow cooker pots... there is an allowable amount.
I think trans fat free or lead free should mean just that... but who am I?

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 15, 2012 11:47:56 PM PST
Pearl Bates says:
I remember the margarine in a plastic bag... drops of the coloring into it and then moosh it all around until it was buttery yellow... my brother and I used to vy for the privilege. Tasted awful, but no butter in those years. :o)

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 15, 2012 11:53:46 PM PST
Pearl Bates says:
Not so many of us war babies... I was born in 42 also... older than dirt.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 16, 2012 12:00:37 AM PST
Pearl Bates says:
acetm... I live up here in the northester and westesterest part of the US in the 4 borders area and googled out of curiosity, even though it is now 2012... haha.
Nothing but this link. https://www.prairiepridepork.com/ Minnesota Company and they have leaf lard for sale. If I ever get back to Farmer's Market over in the ham, I will inquire... but not finding anything around here on the net.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 16, 2012 10:23:24 AM PST
stevign says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Dec 16, 2012 10:25:08 AM PST
stevign says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Dec 16, 2012 10:41:27 AM PST
Cloud says:
Thanks for your input re Safflower. How does it compare to Sunflower or Peanut oil in taste, heating capacity and health. I tried coconut oil when it went on sale at Whole Foods but it is costly & has a distinct sweetish taste, after flavor.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 16, 2012 10:51:29 AM PST
stevign says:
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In reply to an earlier post on Dec 16, 2012 11:18:11 AM PST
Recipe Diva says:
Okay guys... THIS I don't believe, unless it was purely out of necessity. Our ancestors used lots of stuff that wasn't particularly good for them. But wouldn't it be awful to have to kill a bear to get the fat to make piecrust!!!!

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 16, 2012 11:18:26 AM PST
Cloud says:
Thank you!
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