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Do you prefer to read a cookbook on kindle or paper?


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Showing 1-25 of 26 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Oct 24, 2012 12:47:23 PM PDT
Jack Yu says:
We started a Kickstarter project of creating an e-book with online videos to show you how to make sushi, from a master sushi chef.

We are planning to port it over Kindle if everything goes well. Anyway, the project link is below if you are interested.

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1256265752/sushi-ninja-a-complete-guide-to-making-sushi-with?ref=home_location

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 24, 2012 6:43:27 PM PDT
S. Kessler says:
I'm a complete Kindle convert. I really, really like having my cookbooks on Kindle for iPad. Cookbooks don't work on the e-ink Kindles, which are text-based. But they are wonderful on the Kindle App for iPad.

Posted on Oct 24, 2012 6:53:29 PM PDT
Jack Yu says:
Thanks for the tip. We forgot early kindle are black & white only.

Posted on Oct 25, 2012 4:34:23 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 25, 2012 4:39:07 AM PDT
Grandma says:
I really enjoy the interactive cookbooks that I own for my iPad. I review many Kindle cookbooks and find that in general very little attention is paid to them. More than a few, even from big name publishers, are VERY poorly done. I would rather have paper than a mess.

Edited to Add: I should also point out that ALL of my favorite interactive cookbooks are in the iBooks format, not the Kindle format. The large size of my iPad's hard drive and the many computer-rather-than-just-a-reader features make for a great experience.

Those interactive features do not work in Kindle, though perhaps they might in Fire.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 25, 2012 2:46:08 PM PDT
S. Kessler says:
I disagree about Kindle books in the iPad app. Most of the ones I have bought in the past few months are excellently formatted. I find them much easier to read in landscape mode. iBooks always shows double pages in landscape, while with Kindle you can format to view it either way. I find Kindle for iPad formatting much cleaner. And virtually all the cookbooks I have bought in the past year for Kindle foriPad are fully formatted with interactive lists of recipes. Not all, but the vast majority.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 25, 2012 3:00:50 PM PDT
Grandma says:
I almost never read in landscape mode as I prefer a more traditional page shape. Over the last year I have collected well over 1000 Kindle cookbooks, some by independent authors, others by publishing companies - even well known publishing companies.

Yes, they have gotten better over time and I have probably had at least a bit to do with that as I've written many reviews and docked authors very badly for things like no interactive table of contents in a book that runs to a couple hundred pages - makes it impossible to actually use for cooking. Nonetheless, I have yet to come across a single poorly formatted iBook and lousy formatting is still more the norm than not in Kindle. Probably more than a bit of that is due to people running their manuscript through a program to turn it into a Kindle and then never spending the lousy $75 to buy a Kindle to actually LOOK at the thing. Some are so bad it is clear that the publisher has never once opened the cover.

I also find the way that the Kindle app handles graphics horrendously irritating and time consuming.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 25, 2012 3:39:51 PM PDT
S. Kessler says:
Well, I tend not to buy independent cookbooks because I don't trust them to have well tested recipes. I generally confine my purchases to the major cookbook publishers. And I have we'll over 100-125 Kindle cookbooks that I use one iPad. I much prefer landscape orientation for viewing recipes, mostly because with my smart case it is easier to either stand the iPad up to view or lay it down in its typing angle on the table. I also feel like I'm viewing more of the page that way. To each her own. I'll take Kindle over iBooks any day.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 25, 2012 4:16:40 PM PDT
Grandma says:
I got my first one as a freebie shortly after my iPad arrived - The Deli Maven's Cookbook by David Cowles. That one is marvelous. Many of the independently published cookbooks I've acquired I've gotten on days that they are offered for free through Kindle Select. Some of them are excellent, some not. As far as major publishers go, some of the best cookbooks I have do come from major publishers, but so do some of the worst and I've found some real treasures from self published authors.

Yes, I tried the Smart case and didn't like it much for exactly that reason - great for watching TV, not so hot for reading. I have a blue tooth keyboard that works with my iPad, the cover of which folds to make a stand that works in either orientation. The cover gets far and away more use than the keyboard does.

Posted on Oct 25, 2012 5:23:40 PM PDT
[Deleted by the author on Oct 26, 2012 10:19:17 AM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 25, 2012 9:35:50 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 25, 2012 9:36:26 PM PDT
S. Kessler says:
I have a few e-cookbooks with embedded videos, like Jacques Pepin's most recent book, and I find them very helpful. Video can be a very useful tool for teaching technique. That's why I enjoy watching cooking shows, the ones where technique is a big part of the show. I learn a great deal by watching someone perform an activity. Words can really be inadequate for that kind of learning.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 25, 2012 10:23:16 PM PDT
[Deleted by the author on Oct 26, 2012 10:19:10 AM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 26, 2012 8:20:16 AM PDT
S. Kessler says:
Do you know everything about cooking, April? You have nothing to learn? I'm impressed!

Posted on Oct 26, 2012 4:19:46 PM PDT
MommaCat says:
I know that e-cookbooks can be great, but I don't like them. When I'm cooking I don't want the screen to time out as I need to know ingredients and amounts. It's useless that way. It's great though for learning new techniques.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 26, 2012 4:21:31 PM PDT
Grandma says:
Luckily it is a snap to change the blackout time to never on an iPad.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 26, 2012 4:37:47 PM PDT
MommaCat says:
I'm glad you like your iPad.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 26, 2012 4:56:32 PM PDT
Grandma says:
Thanks :) So are my children. They all got together and got me the one with the huge hard drive for Christmas last year and were petrified that I wouldn't like it. I think it should just be grafted to my arm LOL.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 26, 2012 10:49:32 PM PDT
[Deleted by the author on Oct 26, 2012 10:50:20 PM PDT]

Posted on Oct 28, 2012 5:17:00 AM PDT
Sarah says:
Paper every time (actually, hardcover every time; I go out of my way to track down hardcover cookbooks). I do own a Kindle and gladly use it for reading fiction, but for cookbooks I like something I can flip through quickly as a reference.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 29, 2012 11:36:22 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 29, 2012 11:38:00 AM PDT
S. Kessler says:
You can set it not to time out. But if it does, all you have to do is swipe it. You can use a stylus for that so you don't have to use your dirty fingers.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 29, 2012 11:37:23 AM PDT
S. Kessler says:
I feel the same way, Grandma. It is the love of my life! (Um, don't tell my hubby. ;-). )

Posted on Nov 9, 2012 6:56:39 AM PST
widowTink says:
With a paper cookbook I can pencil in notations, changes, things like that. When I'm gone the cookbook may become a family heirloom. It's okay if the pages get a little stained, which is the sign of a very good, much-loved cookbook. I still have my Grandma's White House cookbook. It's our treasure.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 9, 2012 12:12:13 PM PST
S. Kessler says:
You can type in notations on ebooks as well. Just sayin'.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 9, 2012 12:21:39 PM PST
Grandma says:
Yes, you can - but you cannot pass them down to your children and they don't accumulate the value something like a First Edition Mastering the Art of French Cooking does.

Truthfully, I have both. Some books I literally have both. If I can acquire a digital version of a book that I want for significantly less than the paper version, then I'll grab the digital. If the prices are pretty similar, I choose paper every time.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 9, 2012 12:37:05 PM PST
S. Kessler says:
I don't have kids to pass my cookbooks down to, so that issue is moot to me. Not all kids want to inherit their mom's cookbook collection anyway. I have about 300 paper cookbooks that I will bequeath to the local public library, but who knows if they'll be wanting paper books by then.

Obvious,y, both paper and ebooks have their pluses and minuses. Go for whatever suits your fancy. I'm glad both are still available.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 9, 2012 12:50:36 PM PST
Grandma says:
"I'm glad both are still available. "

Me too . . .
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Discussion in:  Cooking forum
Participants:  7
Total posts:  26
Initial post:  Oct 24, 2012
Latest post:  Nov 9, 2012

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