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Bean Pots


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Showing 1-24 of 24 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Feb 20, 2013 11:20:33 AM PST
widowTink says:
I'm thinking about investing in a bean pot. I've read that they make superior bean-cooking vessels, but when I came to look up "bean pots" I was amazed at the variety. Looking for some tips, recommendations, suggestions? Do bean pots really make a difference in baked beans?

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 20, 2013 1:11:10 PM PST
Becky (NOLA) says:
We like our baked beans with that lovely crust on top, so, even though we have a bean pot for other beans, for baked beans we spread them out thinly in a 9x13 pan and bake.

I have a yellow descoware bean pot, which I picked up a thrift store very cheap because they didn't know what they had,.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 20, 2013 8:53:43 PM PST
S. Kessler says:
Any Dutch oven makes a good bean pot. I particularly like my Emile Henry 4.2 qt. Dutch oven. It is made from a ceramic clay and is much lighter than cast iron. So it is easy to take from stovetop to oven. I've done baked beans in it that I cooked for 7 hours at a very low temp. It is the perfect size for one pound of beans.

Emile Henry Flame Top 4.2-Quart Round Oven, Red

Posted on Feb 22, 2013 1:29:50 PM PST
widowTink says:
My dutch oven is stainless steel. It would probably do the job (I must say, I'm about to embark on my FIRST bean-baking adventure!) But I've read that clay bean pots impart a creaminess to the beans, that was the statement that got me a-thinkin' about bean pots. I do love beans. I want to bake beans NOW. Would a $100 Bean Pot make tastier beans than a $16 Bean Pot? hmmm.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 22, 2013 11:14:37 PM PST
S. Kessler says:
I think the thickness of the pot is the greater factor. The clay holds very even hear for a long time, which prevents burning on the bottom. Stainless steel is not as good an insulator and gan gain and lose heat quickly. But if that's what you have it will work, I'm sure.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 25, 2013 2:11:39 PM PST
Resips says:
I too have a yellow DescoWare bean pot that I got new more years ago than I like to say. It holds my kitchen tools while I bake beans in my Grandma's old clay bean pot. Someday, my granddaughter will get both.

Posted on Feb 27, 2013 11:18:35 AM PST
widowTink says:
Well mouseketeers, I did it. I made me a mess o' baked beans yesterday, using my SS dutch oven. I used the Maple Baked Beans recipe from this book. Awesome recipe using the pink beans I had on hand. mmmmm.....DH was majorly impressed and took leftovers for his lunch today. Now I need to try a bean pot, and see if it makes a difference. BTW, that book is AWESOME, I made THREE recipes from it yesterday....The baked beans, some slider buns and a batch of ginger chew cookies. Everything was delicious, and I don't want to return that book to the library.......

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 28, 2013 7:23:18 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 28, 2013 7:39:27 AM PST
joaniepony® says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

Posted on Feb 28, 2013 7:43:33 AM PST
widowTink says:
Hi joaniepony! From what I've read, adding salt at the beginning makes the beans tough. Old beans do take longer, but they are fine every other way. I don't think I would ever try a salt-water soak....just seems like they would up the sodium content of my beans. I love love love beans, I've never met a bean I didn't like. Fave is black-eye peas....dig 'em cooked a la Hopping John, or made into a wicked good hillbilly hummus. I do a big pot of chili every three weeks or so, to have it on hand in the freezer. This was my first time making Baked Beans (don't know why it took me so long!)

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 28, 2013 8:35:31 AM PST
joaniepony® says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 28, 2013 10:47:55 AM PST
S. Kessler says:
What book are you talking about, please?

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 28, 2013 10:51:18 AM PST
S. Kessler says:
Joanie is right, Cooks Illustrated recommends adding salt to the soaking water. The claim it makes the skins more porous while keeping them intact, and the then plump up faster and more evenly. They say that it is not salt but acid ingredients that toughen the bean and prevent proper cooking.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 28, 2013 11:12:08 AM PST
joaniepony® says:
OK, Let's see, oh yeah!! Are we talking about my COOK BOOK???
Someone needs to write one for the modern youth~~~~
My mother never explained why you need to pierce a potato, before you put it into the oven to bake~~~I just did what any good daughter would do, and followed her directions. Except one time! You learn by experience!!!
It seems that in Jr and Hi school classes, sex education is more important than cooking.
Yahoo Answers is a fun place to go to answer Questions~~Like: "Can you use a pie tin instead of a cake pan to bake a cake?"

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 28, 2013 3:42:36 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Feb 28, 2013 3:44:00 PM PST
S. Kessler says:
Thanks, Joanie, but was asking parrotink what book she used for the bean recipe.

Edit: never mind. I didn't realize there was a link. Too bad it doesn't come n Kindle.

In reply to an earlier post on Feb 28, 2013 4:18:40 PM PST
joaniepony® says:
Sorry bout that, SK,

So I guess I don't have to make up any more lies about all the books I'm gonna write~~

In Cook's Illustrated , The Best Recipe, Soups & Stews, Has some interesting information about the freshness of beans,
there is no guarantee.
The best beans I've had in my lifetime, were fresh home-grown, purple hull peas. The look like they are related to black-eyed peas.

Posted on Mar 1, 2013 11:52:45 AM PST
widowTink says:
Spilling the Beans: Cooking and Baking with Beans and Grains Everyday is the book, SK. I found it at the library. Don't want to return it. Will probably buy a used copy here.

I'm trying to work up the courage to do something with tofu. I read about a feta cheese substitute with soaking firm tofu in the juice from a jar of kalamata olives. It turns into a salty crumbly accent I can put on salads and stuff???? I want to try this since I don't like real cheeses of any kind....but tofu IS beans, right???

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 1, 2013 9:31:18 PM PST
S. Kessler says:
That's why I now buy my beans from Ramcho Gordo. They are not only heirloom, but very fresh. They cook up so much faster than supermarket beans. And they taste so much better.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 1, 2013 9:32:57 PM PST
S. Kessler says:
Tofu is soy beans. I like some tofu, but not as a substitute for other things. For me it's real cheese or nothing. I'd rather limit my cheese intake than eat any kind of cheese advertised as low fat or, god forbid, nonfat. Horrible!

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 2, 2013 9:30:36 AM PST
joaniepony® says:
SK,

My feelings e+actly (my e+ is stuck), No Lo-Fat or sugarless candy for me~~~Tofu in stir-fry ,sucks up the sauce flavors,that is the only way I've eaten it.
There is a big controversy going on about processed soy beans, such as milk,tofu and other meat or dairy substitutes.
Dr. Oz is one of the leaders against processed soy products.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 2, 2013 10:14:33 PM PST
S. Kessler says:
Is he? What does he have to say about it?

Posted on Mar 3, 2013 7:25:48 AM PST
[Deleted by the author on Oct 29, 2013 11:20:37 PM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 3, 2013 9:13:26 AM PST
joaniepony® says:
SK,

Everything in moderation~~~~~Inhibits the absorption of Thyroid medication.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 29, 2013 2:08:04 PM PDT
Ted Brooks says:
I too have heard and found through experience that adding beans before they are fully cooked takes away from the taste. Anyone who cooks beans ofter will tell you that. Old fashioned cookbooks will sometimes tell you to add salt while first cooking the beans, but I found it produced a lesser bean. And I cook a lot of heirloom beans....love them.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 29, 2013 2:18:38 PM PDT
joaniepony® says:
Ted,

I was talking about an article in Cook's Illustrated Magazine. It explains adding salt to the soak water softens the skins. The beans are rinsed eliminating the salt water before cooking. I have been guilty of adding salt while cooking with unsatisfactory results (tough beans) .
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Discussion in:  Cooking forum
Participants:  7
Total posts:  24
Initial post:  Feb 20, 2013
Latest post:  Oct 29, 2013

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