Customer Discussions > Cooking forum

Do people still cook with lard


Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-25 of 481 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Jan 8, 2010 5:57:44 AM PST
Author says:
Lard has 40% saturated fat, 60% for butter. The level of monounsaturated "good" fat is 45% butter 23%. Lard used to be an important cooking and baking ingredient why did cooks turn away from lard which has no trans fat in favor of butter, trans fat vegetable oil etc... Religious reasons aside why don't people cook with lard?

Posted on Jan 8, 2010 6:16:59 AM PST
Patrick says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

Posted on Jan 8, 2010 8:56:21 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 8, 2010 9:31:55 AM PST
Lard has a lot of cholesterol; I guess that is the reason. Perhaps butter made from cream seems more wholesome than fat that is melted away from raw meats. I know I was horrified to learn that the pre-made pie crusts at the supermarket have lard. I usually make my own pie crusts but not always and I don't use lard. The only other reason I can think of is availability. People used what they had when they didn't have as many choices as we have today.

Posted on Jan 8, 2010 9:30:33 AM PST
GW™ says:
We had a discussion about this very subject recently & it seems that the composition of lard has changed. Bad stuff has been added to it to prolong shelf life. Some folks said the lard at Whole Foods is the former, better type.

I'll try to round up our authority on the subject.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 8, 2010 9:32:03 AM PST
curious cook says:
I cook with lard all the time. This has been a big topic in this community across several threads in the recent past, so it's funny that you bring it up. The biggest problem is that most the lard you can buy in the store has been hydrogenated to be shelf stable, which makes it really bad for you. I am lucky enough here to be able to buy locally rendered lard at Whole Foods. You can also render your own very easily from fat back. I just made black beans last night, and sauteed the veggies for the beans in a couple tablespoones of lard. I use it for frying and for pie crusts as well, neither of which I do that often. It is actually better for you than butter,as you pointed out. I think it was just demonized back in the 70's, and hasn't recovered.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 8, 2010 10:16:10 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 8, 2010 10:16:34 AM PST
GW™ says:
Thanks for helping me out CC.
You KNOW I only half listen to stuff.....& then with my STML......uh, I forgot what that stands for......sawwee.

Posted on Jan 8, 2010 10:21:09 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 8, 2010 10:22:29 AM PST
joaniepony® says:
I have looked high and low for flour tortillas made with LARD!

I have been told by excellent cooks, the best pie crusts contain lard.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 8, 2010 11:45:43 AM PST
curious cook says:
pony, for heaven's sake, make them yourself. It is easy, easy, easy.

Last weekend, I made a crust I usally make with butter and cream cheese, but this time I substitute lard for half the butter. Cream cheese for tenderness, butter for flavor, and lard for flakiness. It was the best crust I've ever made.

At Whole Foods here, the containers of lard are fairly large. I used an icecream scoop to portion out 1/4 cup scoops, froze them, and then bagged them up. Now, when I want to use lard, I can just grab little 1/4 cup portions right out of the freezer. My understanding is that it will last forever in the freezer.

Posted on Jan 8, 2010 12:14:15 PM PST
joaniepony® says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

Posted on Jan 8, 2010 12:30:40 PM PST
The thought of using lard makes my skin crawl with goosebumps. But, then, I'm sure I've eaten worse foods during the hundreds of times in my life I've eaten at restaurants, which were just as bad and camouflaged by a healthy appearance and carefully crafted menu descriptions...

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 8, 2010 12:37:12 PM PST
joaniepony® says:
JS, just think bacon drippings, that is a form of lard on a small scale or sausage gravy, you're using the fat as the base, sort of the same way as you make white sauce, fat,flour,and liquid. Real old fashion home cooking, before mass production.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 8, 2010 12:39:46 PM PST
curious cook says:
you are well programed, JS. Lard is not a bad fat, but for whatever reason, the lard = bad message was pounded into the public for years. Better for you than butter, way better than ANY hydrogenated fats. But, I know I'm preaching into the void. Lot's of people react just the way you do. I know I sound like the lard queen, but I really don't use it that much. Just where it's the right tool for the best result. Like anything, used in moderation, it's just not that bad.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 8, 2010 12:47:53 PM PST
joaniepony® says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

Posted on Jan 8, 2010 1:37:43 PM PST
Fred Astaire says:
Baking with lard: I was born in 1950, and my mother and grandmother always made pie crusts with lard. They were delicious. I think lard fell out of favor (as did eggs) when medical studies showed that people with high levels of cholesterol in the blood were more likely to have heart disease. However, subsequent studies showed that it wasn't dietary cholesterol (contained in animal fats, eggs, and other animal products) that raised blood levels of cholesterol--it was saturated fat. Even more recent studies have shown that trans-fats (when liquid oil is hydrogenated to make it solid at room temperature and thus more stable and give it a long shelf life) are the main culprit in producing high cholesterol levels in the blood and thus heart disease. I don't make many pies anymore (need to watch my overall calorie intake) but lard would be perfectly fine IF I could use lard made in the old-fashioned way, i.e., not hydrogenated so it can be stored at room temperature but instead needing to be kept refrigerated. If you buy the lard in the refrigerator section, that might be a good sign that it is OK (although read the label to be sure--do not buy it if is says "hydrogenated" or "partially hydrogenated" anywhere on the label. By the way, pies made with lard do NOT taste like meat but just of flaky, light pastry-ness. Of course, if you are a vegetarian this whole discussion is moot.

Posted on Jan 8, 2010 4:13:24 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jan 8, 2010 4:14:03 PM PST
Talyn says:
How much cholesterol does lard add to food if it's used,some of the best pizza crusts,New York style,I ever had were made with lard.

Most of the genuine New York Italian eateries I had pizza at never listed the cholesterol levels in their pizza crusts.

Isn't lard animal fat?

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 8, 2010 4:25:08 PM PST
curious cook says:
yes, Talyn, lard is pig fat. I wouldn't worry too much about the cholesterol. Like all animal fats, it has it, but used in moderation, it can certainly occupy a slot in a healthyt diet.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 8, 2010 4:45:02 PM PST
ace™ says:
Yes, lard is animal fat, specifically the pig animal.

I think lard really got a bad name when people started calling other people "lard @ss" or "tub o' lard"... it didn't help the already sullied rep from just being an animal fat.

JS... joaniepony is correct... bacon drippings (which I keep in the fridge for cooking, BTW) are a form of lard. So is the fat on the bacon when you eat it.

If you want to use lard, make sure you use leaf lard or plain rendered lard. Rendering it yourself from fatback in pretty easy!

And how do those companies such as Morrell get away with selling a shelf-stable product that says "With hydrogenated lard" on the label and then say there are zero grams of trans-fats per serving? I guess it's because the "serving size" (1 T) is so small that there are 35 servings in the entire package. I honestly think that one more column should be added to the nutritionals... the amounts contained in the ENTIRE container. Then they would have to tell you that there IS trans-fat in their product. It's the same with those Pam and Crisco sprays... they SAY on the label that there are no fats or calories, but a serving size is "ONE-THIRD OF A *SECOND*" Riiiiiiight..... and there are 575 SERVINGS in a container? So, since it's an OIL spray, how much fat IS THERE?
Sorry, that little rant was off-topic... and since I have no Whole Foods near me and the grocery stores near me don't always carry fatback, I DO buy the hydrogenated lard once in a while because sometimes it just works better than butter or liquid fats. Still, it's a once-in-a-while thing, not a regular thing. And the taste with the lard is heavenly!

Love those pork products!

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 8, 2010 4:57:36 PM PST
curious cook says:
Hi Catherine. While I do feel lucky being able to get locally rendered pig fat at the WF here in Greenville, I'd be willing to bet that isn't the case at all WF's. This is the south, where biscuits and pie crusts are sacred foods, and fat back is king. Don't know where you are, but I bet there is a local pig farmer rendering fat. Call a good local mexican joint.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 8, 2010 5:32:47 PM PST
sailcocktail says:
Yes, the hydrogenization is a problem for me, otherwise I would cook with lard more. I just don't have access to fresh leaf lard to render my own ;-(

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 8, 2010 5:33:27 PM PST
sailcocktail says:
brilliant on the ice cream scoop portions. B/c fat lasts almost forever at 0 degrees.

Posted on Jan 8, 2010 5:34:27 PM PST
Author says:
My grandmother, mother and aunts used lard for frying chicken, fish, and pork chops and the house did not smell "fried" when the cooking was done. Biscuits in my famliy is made from four ingredients and lard is one. We may eat fried foods twice a month, biscuits Sunday morning and my friends think I'm old fashioned for using lard (and saving my bacon drippings to add to cabbage to make the best side dish ever) but I see lard as a better for you fat.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 8, 2010 5:55:38 PM PST
[Deleted by Amazon on Feb 16, 2010 3:54:20 PM PST]

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 8, 2010 7:21:04 PM PST
ace™ says:
Isabella,
I usually buy whole chickens and save the fat (schmaltz!) in a bag in the freezer... it is WONDERFUL to use in cooking and the BEST for the dumplings in Chicken and Dumplings! I learned that little trick from Cook's Illustrated! I always make my own baking powder every time I need it (baking soda and cream of tartar) and with those two changes, my dumplings went from sometimes perfect and sometimes doughy to ALWAYS light and fluffy! And with the chicken fat, the flavor is heavenly!

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 8, 2010 7:27:37 PM PST
ace™ says:
Hi, curious cook!
I live in the Seattle area... but way up north... I may have to do some checking around for the fatback or leaf lard since I really don't like using the hydrogenated stuff even though the nutritionals "say" there are no trans fats. I tried using salt pork one time, years ago...looks about the same, ya know? ...boy HOWDY, did *I* learn a lesson! ;-)

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 8, 2010 7:34:43 PM PST
[Deleted by Amazon on Feb 16, 2010 3:54:20 PM PST]
‹ Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ... 20 Next ›
[Add comment]
Add your own message to the discussion
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Prompts for sign-in
 


Recent discussions in the Cooking forum (843 discussions)

Discussion Replies Latest Post
Twinkie Temple #4 172 4 hours ago
What Are The "Must Haves" From...PENZEYS ? 102 1 day ago
Fondant 4 1 day ago
Baking in a Breville Smart Oven 146 10 days ago
Pressure Cookers 153 19 days ago
American made products 172 22 days ago
Sun Tea Jar??? Need help finding one... 64 23 days ago
Microwave not made in China? 17 Jun 3, 2014
Has anyone actually seen Corning Ware Pyroceram or VISIONS cookware explode? 395 May 30, 2014
Ethnic Vegetarian 0 May 30, 2014
Healthy Crockpot Recipes <3 0 May 29, 2014
Bread top falls 7 May 27, 2014

Active discussions in related forums  
   
 

This discussion

Discussion in:  Cooking forum
Participants:  97
Total posts:  481
Initial post:  Jan 8, 2010
Latest post:  Jan 13, 2013

New! Receive e-mail when new posts are made.
Tracked by 18 customers

Search Customer Discussions