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In reply to an earlier post on May 20, 2012 5:33:42 PM PDT
HI Peggy;
Is that a chicken ala king recipe? If so, yes it sounds wonerful and thank you!

Posted on May 20, 2012 5:42:56 PM PDT
peggy says:
It sorta is........it's fairly simple layering of ingredients. The tortilla's (or noodles) are the staple of this dish.

1 Chicken, boiled and deboned
1 dozen tortillas
1 onion, chopped
Grated Cheese
1 can cream of mushroom soup
1 can cream of chicken soup
1 can Rotel Tomatoes
1/2 cup chicken broth
combine soup, tomatoes, and broth, stir to make "sauce".
In 2 1/2 quart casserole, place layer of chicken, 1/2 tortillas, 1/2 of the onion and 1/2 sauce. Repeat, ending with cheese, cover. (If you prefer noodles, blanch, cook 1/2 done, small bag of noodles and use instead of tortillas)
Bake 350 degrees for 40-50 minutes Traditional method is to use tortillas.

In reply to an earlier post on May 20, 2012 5:43:12 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 20, 2012 5:55:27 PM PDT
Thank you so much for both of these recipes! When I grew up, I realized that part of why I so liked the chic ala-K was the pimentos! Now I keep them on had for putti ginto fried potatoes, chicken soup, stir fries, etc.

In reply to an earlier post on May 20, 2012 5:52:58 PM PDT
Maybe try Better World Books. I usually have better luck with them
www.betterworldbooks.com

In reply to an earlier post on May 20, 2012 5:54:27 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 20, 2012 5:55:41 PM PDT
White House Cookbook:
They do have the original version here. I have two copies of it, both purchased here.

In reply to an earlier post on May 20, 2012 5:57:41 PM PDT
"That is history" - - that's how I view it too. ONe can learn so much of an era or a culture by exploring the foods they prepare and eat. So energizing and enchanting!

In reply to an earlier post on May 20, 2012 5:59:29 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 20, 2012 6:16:51 PM PDT
Fried chicken livers! Yes! We had 8 kids and every Sat night, my mom prepared this! When they could afford it, we graduated to fried chicken, but then we fought over the livers. I now make pate with them YUM!

In reply to an earlier post on May 20, 2012 6:01:36 PM PDT
Boston Cooking School cookbooks - - GREAT! I have this, plus did you kow that thye also have a baking book? I Got that too! What fun! I also still have my battered and beat up 1960's paperback editio of this. Still use it too. Just reading these is like eating!

In reply to an earlier post on May 20, 2012 6:03:37 PM PDT
Pittsburgh Potates/Fannie Farmer:

Thank you! I will hve to look this one up, but thank you for posting it!

In reply to an earlier post on May 20, 2012 6:05:34 PM PDT
Hi Elizabeth:

1973 Good Housekeeping Cookbook.

I found this cookbook available for 6 cents here! Going to order that in a few days - - (payday) Thanks for the hint! I also collect cookbooks and have several hundred myself - -aren't they fun to read? Have you seen Theresa Lust's "Pass the Polenta?" I learned how to make polenta from it, and it is wonderful to read. I have bought about a half dozen copies so far as gifts! (I keep the first editions for myself tho) I even wrote a poem about this experience, reading the book and making the polenta.
Pass the Polenta: And Other Writings from the Kitchen

Such fun!

In reply to an earlier post on May 20, 2012 10:59:48 PM PDT
A. Lyons says:
I have a large collection of old pots and pans and kitchen tools and love to imagine what the former owners of them might have made for their family dinners while using them. I well remember my mothers shock upon learning that my sister had donated all of the pot and pan lids in the house to the war cause. Glass lids soon replaced the metal.
I have a looseleaf binder for each food catagory and was showing some of my late mothers hand written recipes to a young granddaugher of mine and almost cried when I saw her pass her tiny hand over the yellowed recipe as if trying to connect with mother. I miss my mother daily and there are so things I wish I'd asked her such as how in the world did she make the worlds best dark fruitcake? She laughingly asked me one day if I thought anyone could get fruitcake poisoning if they ate to many slices of her rich dark sweet fruitcake in one day and I told her I bet it was possible.

In reply to an earlier post on May 20, 2012 11:05:18 PM PDT
A. Lyons says:
The quick chow mein came in cans and my mother made it for the 8 of us kids. It was nasty but we felt so grown up eating foreign food. I remember the first time she made homemade pizza and it was such a nice surprise. Her spagetti sauce on a breaddough recipe with cheese on top. We thought it magical!

In reply to an earlier post on May 20, 2012 11:09:39 PM PDT
A. Lyons says:
What I didn't realize until it was to late was that each Joy of Cooking has different recipes in it as they are updated and I'm so sorry I gave my first copy away.
I always write notes next to the name of a new recipe I try so my children will know how I changed it up or to warn them they didn't care for a recipe. If I write GREAT! next to a recipe you can believe we loved it. I still use my old McCalls binder filled with great soup recipes and wouldn't trade or sell it for anything.

In reply to an earlier post on May 21, 2012 4:01:57 AM PDT
peggy says:
A. Lyons..........My Mom made a dark fruitcake that only a few of the family members would even touch, but I loved it. I did finally remember to ask her for the ingredients and I was surprised to find out that she started making them in July each year for gifts at Christmastime. The final ingredient, which is what I think made the "cake" so dark and sticky was: She made her cakes in metal tins, lined with brown paper from grocery sacks, baked them and then sealed them with another piece of the brown paper and the metal lid. Once a month, she tells me privately, (!) she would open the tins and pour a 1/4 cup of dark rum over the op of the cake and then re-seal the tin. The achohol would evaporate over time but would leave the dark sticky film all over the cake. They were delicious and I miss them today.

In reply to an earlier post on May 21, 2012 11:19:02 AM PDT
ClaraS says:
My grandmother made this starting with a big pot of chicken soup, then adding these. We called them "kluski." I still make them today. I like it especially when I am sick, good comfort food. I don't often make a from-scratch soup, but use Mrs. Grass chicken soup mix (dry soup mix).

In reply to an earlier post on May 21, 2012 12:05:54 PM PDT
" I miss my mother daily "

I do too. I often head for the phone to call her, only to stop in my tracks and say to myself - - "She would have loved hearing about this." It is a long-lasting ache not to be able to share something with her. She taught me so much.

In reply to an earlier post on May 21, 2012 12:10:32 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 21, 2012 12:12:10 PM PDT
A. Lyons.........."My Mom made a dark fruitcake"

I remember those! The whole neighborhood made these! (My M-I-L was famous for her Brazil Nut fruitcake, which she would only share the recipe for with me.) Unfortunately it was lost over several moves over time, but I still remember THE best ingredient - - candied cherried and whole brazil nuts! Maybe a bit of amaretto - - YUMM!

In reply to an earlier post on May 21, 2012 12:15:53 PM PDT
"Mrs. Grass chicken soup mix (dry soup mix")

Oh Yes! This was a real treat. I now make a similar soup using very thin rice noodles with some asparaagus bits in it, lots of garlic, scallion greens, onion + + + and an egg. (can't have Mrs. Grass due to food allergies.) I make my broth from the bones of the latest roasted chicken, then make this into my soup.

In reply to an earlier post on May 21, 2012 12:16:53 PM PDT
"each Joy of Cooking has different recipes in it "

I didn't know this. Thanks for the info!

In reply to an earlier post on May 21, 2012 12:18:44 PM PDT
"My grandmother made this starting with a big pot of chicken soup, then adding these. We called them "kluski.""

What are the "these" you are referrng to? I can't find that thread. Sounds like dumplings?

Posted on May 21, 2012 3:12:01 PM PDT
A. Lyons says:
I well remember the first time I ate chicken and dumplings at my Aunt Effies in Delaware and her's had no carrots or celery in it as my mothers or grandmothers did, but the biggest surprise was when she rolled out dough good and flat and cut the pieces about one inch by two inches and then dumped them into the pot of chicken and broth. I told her how they were made in my family and she thought it very odd indeed so I made her some. I made the dropped dumpling recipe I'd learned from mother and they were Light as a feather inside and tasting gently of sage and she said she loved them but had to make her flat dumplings as the men expected them. I never make homemade noodles that I don't think of Aunt Effies strange flat dumplings.

In reply to an earlier post on May 21, 2012 3:31:33 PM PDT
Just Peachy says:
Effie is the name of more than one of my older relatives. As southerners, we make flat dumplings but we don't use sage. Granny made flat dumplings from canned biscuits. We also don't like sage in our dressing - which is made from cornbread and cooked in a pan, not stuffed in a turkey.

In reply to an earlier post on May 21, 2012 7:21:10 PM PDT
A. Lyons;
YOUr story b rings back so many childhood memories. I love that cooking ws so central to my upbringing and family and community. There was such a safety about those meals, whether from scratch chicken and dumplings (My mommade both rolled and ropped dumplings) or a can of B&M beans cooking in the can on the stove while hot dogs simmered in a pan on the burner behind them. YUMM! I would recommend Theresa Lust's book 'PASS THE POLENTA," as her stories are much like yours and they evoke that same sense of safety and comeraderie. Thank you for the wonderful memory.

Posted on May 22, 2012 5:13:29 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 22, 2012 5:13:56 PM PDT
Drat! Missing my mother an grandmother now... Fruitcakes taking two weeks for my mother to make...a few days for grandmother....Nannaws chicken and dumplings groanssssss.... Fried chicken livers I took forever to learn to love..... That chicken n rice made in the pot on the stove....and yes that nasty but grown up chicken ah la king.... Now who remembers the chef boy Ardee spaghetti box that's green and had the special seasoning packet for tomato paste when mom was in a huge hurry?? And grandmothers fried peach pies using bisquits and dried peaches? And the first time and only time my nannaw agreed to show me what pulled taffy was by making it homemade....buttered hands and all.... And snow icecream! I'm going to hush now and sip my coffee. Lotsa love y'all

Posted on May 22, 2012 5:15:39 PM PDT
Cast iron skillet fudge you couldn't stir or touch or it would crystalize?
Cracklin corn bread in the same cast iron skillet.... And fried green tomatoes and onions.... Sorry had to
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Discussion in:  Cooking forum
Participants:  72
Total posts:  407
Initial post:  May 13, 2012
Latest post:  Sep 3, 2013

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