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Old Cookbooks


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In reply to an earlier post on May 22, 2012 5:44:20 PM PDT
VICTOR says:
Actually I remeber mom "making" us pizza on Fridays. Chef Boy Ardee in a box.
The cheese was sprinkled on top. It was that or carry out. No frozen at that time. Wow.

In reply to an earlier post on May 22, 2012 5:49:17 PM PDT
Susan says:
I Remember Chef Boy Ardee in a box. And Yes
The cheese was sprinkled on top.

Posted on May 22, 2012 6:43:08 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on May 22, 2012 6:46:47 PM PDT
joaniepony® says:
Culinary Arts Institute Encyclopedic Cookbook
I have this one.

Out of curiosity I checked out potato salad and it says to boil whole in the skins (jackets)
That is how I've always made it. Then I checked out mashed potatoes, same thing, so that
is how I make them now.
Even though the publication date is 1950 it was previously published starting; 1940.

In reply to an earlier post on May 23, 2012 1:10:16 AM PDT
A. Lyons says:
I used to love to watch my grandmothers cook and learned so much from them but the one recipe I never could master was my dads mothers chicken and rice. She'd cook the chicken parts in only salt and pepper and butter and then pour in a couple of handfuls of rice and add water and then cover it and cook it for a while and it was delicious. It must have been the love she added that made it taste so good.
The only soap she ever used for everything was Fel's Napfa. I have the spelling wrong I know but I can still smell it. I loved her stories and miss her so much.

In reply to an earlier post on May 23, 2012 1:16:03 AM PDT
A. Lyons says:
How interesting. Mama made fudge all the time and we ate it when it crystalized or not. My dad was the candy maker in the family and even made himself a marble topped candy table. His bon bons were wonderful.
Corn bread cooked in bacon drippings in a cast iron pan is pure heaven.
Fried green tomatoe sandwiches with bacon and avacado on them is yummy but I make pan gravy after I've fried the tomatoes sometimes and put the tomatoes and gravy on rice or over scrambled eggs.

In reply to an earlier post on May 23, 2012 1:20:34 PM PDT
"fried green tomatoes"

I remember these YUMM!! I still make the on occasion.

In reply to an earlier post on May 25, 2012 7:36:05 AM PDT
S. Kessler says:
It's so hard to believe we really ate like this once upon a time.

Posted on May 25, 2012 2:20:37 PM PDT
A. Lyons says:
My family and I still eat this way and I'm 70. My children make many of the same recipes I made when they were young. It's about portion control, exercise and not eating the fatty foods daily but including great soups, salads etc to balance everything out. On holidays I make anything they request and it's fun to see the menu evolve. We all work hard and play and still eat homemade foods. Sunday afternoons is the time to cook for the week if you're working outside of the home. I worked in a law firm daily so I used my crockpot often because when I got home with 4 kids, a husband and dog, my dessert catering service and fiber art company needed my attention. I completed all of the paperwork for the company my husband and I owned at night after the kids were in bed and stopped working on everything at 11 so I could get some rest. My fiber art company CISSY'S is now 46 years old and I'm praying that I'll live to see it become 50 years old. I always felt that putting a nice meal on the table was an act of love and believe it to this day. It was the time we connected as a family and had our Bible study and our geography lesson each evening over dinner and I would read aloud from a book such as The Little House On The Prairie series while the family ate their dessert. Sweet times and now I'm a great grandmother many times over...

Posted on May 27, 2012 12:10:58 PM PDT
Bundtlust says:
I'm a huge fan of vintage cookbooks; I like to pick up 1950s-1960s brand-name pamphlets (Solo, etc.) at library sales and Half-Price books (you can find some amazing complete collections of Time-Life cookbooks, annual compilations of Southern Living recipes, etc. there). My mom has several of the old Congressional Club cookbooks from the 1970s, and my grandmothers had church / community cookbooks dating back several decades.

I *loved* Grandma's Wartime Kitchen: World War II and the Way We Cooked, Grandma's Wartime Baking Book: World War II and the Way We Baked, Heirloom Baking with the Brass Sisters: More than 100 Years of Recipes Discovered and Collected by the Queens of Comfort Food(TM) and Heirloom Cooking With the Brass Sisters: Recipes You Remember and Love, and as a recent Vine pick I got From the Family Kitchen: Discover Your Food Heritage and Preserve Favorite Recipes, and there's another similar title, Sweet Home: Over 100 Heritage Desserts and Ideas for Preserving Family Recipes, that also looks promising.

In reply to an earlier post on May 27, 2012 2:43:03 PM PDT
A. Lyons says:
I'm currently writing the history of our huge family with recipes good and bad but the difference in mine is that my daughter will pick up where I leave off and add her familys story and recipes and then one of her daughters will etc. It will be continuos.
I found my mothers dark fruitcake recipe today but it's handwritten and a little faded in places but will post it after I figure out what's written in the faded places.

In reply to an earlier post on May 28, 2012 12:43:09 PM PDT
I can't wait Lyons!!!
I'm going to have to hunt for the war time cookbooks VCQ I'd love those!

In reply to an earlier post on May 28, 2012 3:05:41 PM PDT
Donna says:
I am an old grandma also and have just found this site. My husband was a women's editor on a newspaper and got all the newest cookbooks to review back in the 1960s. We also have all of my mom's (born 1910- died 3/11/2012) old cookbooks from her mom and aunts- most are handwritten and use measurements like 'a teacup full' or 'a spoonful' so are hard to use. Also the old church cookbooks are full of family recipes. My oldest grandchild (nearly 4 now) loves to bake with me, just as I did with my mom, and we often make Great Grandma's Soft Molasses Cookies and Aunt Sally's Cottage Cheese Cookies. Scratch baking has gone out of style today and I want to be sure my grandkids know how to 'really' bake.

In reply to an earlier post on May 28, 2012 3:21:20 PM PDT
Oh may I please have the cottage cheese cookies recipe? .....my absolute favorites are those ' hard to use measurement' recipes handwritten with love.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 3, 2012 3:39:10 PM PDT
Donna says:
Jennifer, glad to share the recipe that was my Aunt Sally Metcalf's specialty.
Cottage Cheese Cookies
Cream together 1 cup brown sugar and 1/2 cup butter until fluffy. Beat in a egg and 1 1/2 tsp. vanilla. Stir in 1/2 cup small curd cottage cheese. Sift together 1 1/2 cups flour, 1/2 tsp. each salt and baking soda and 1 tsp. nutneg. Add to batter and stir to blend well. Stir in a cup of chopped walnuts. Spoon out by tablespoons onto greased cookie sheet and flatten a bit a glass that is buttered and then dipped in sugar. This makes a nice crispy, sweet crust on top. Bake at 375 for 15 minutes, or until lightly browned. Cool on rack. Freeze well after baking. Enjoy.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 3, 2012 6:07:29 PM PDT
Grandma says:
OH - that isn't BEVAGOO! That is Kentucky BURGOO - a rather famous dish that originally had squirrel along with the chicken.

Posted on Jun 12, 2012 9:59:20 PM PDT
A. Lyons says:
I found the old whole wheat bread recipe I used to make for my four kids. I'd bake the two loves just before they got home from school and they'd eat them up with butter and honey on them and drink big mugs of hot coco or glasses of milk. That would hold them until dinner time. I made copies of the old torn recipe and sent them out to the kids who are now grown with kids of their own and they were delighted to have the recipe. Let me know if anyone would like the recipe. I've put oatmeal and sunflower seeds in it at times. Yum!

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 13, 2012 5:33:50 PM PDT
Becky (NOLA) says:
My cousins made the Illinois version with whatever, squirrel, possum, chicken etc

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 14, 2012 4:20:56 AM PDT
John Garwood says:
The name probably wasn't clear to read but it is "Burgoo" . I've eaten it many times and it is very good!

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 18, 2012 5:49:51 AM PDT
I'd love the recipe!
Sounds wonderful....
Email is Mtarbarnes69@hotmail.com
Thank You!!!

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 20, 2012 12:00:41 PM PDT
blues clues says:
A. Lyons says:
I found the old whole wheat bread recipe I used to make for my four kids. I'd bake the two loves just before they got home from school and they'd eat them up with butter and honey on them and drink big mugs of hot coco or glasses of milk. That would hold them until dinner time. I made copies of the old torn recipe and sent them out to the kids who are now grown with kids of their own and they were delighted to have the recipe. Let me know if anyone would like the recipe. I've put oatmeal and sunflower seeds in it at times. Yum!

Yes!! Iwould love to have the whole wheat recipe!! With 4 kids in the house,
I would love them to help bake with me. (^0^)

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 21, 2012 11:10:58 AM PDT
B. Kaufman says:
@A.Lyons
Fels Naptha, widely used for almost anything soap-like, including treatment for measles, poison ivy, chicken pox.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 21, 2012 12:20:16 PM PDT
Lives to Eat says:
Lyons - you reminded me when mentioning tongue. Actually, I learned to eat it when quite young. Of course, all I saw was the artfully presented dish of delicate slices with an accompaniment of horseradish sauce. Yumm. Later in my life I persuaded my husband that it was really delicious. It was everything I could do to get through the cooking process, especially when it rolled in the pot. The end result was that he did enjoy it. A note: tongue is probably the leanest portion of the cow.

Tomato aspic is a fav of mine. Usually have it as a base under fresh steamed asparagus spears with a light mayo/lemon dressing.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 22, 2012 12:23:18 PM PDT
A. Lyons says:
The only tomato aspic recipe I've really liked was from my Aunt Marybelle of Rehobath Beach Delaware. Her's has lemon Jello in it and V-8 Juice. She filled it with shrimp, hearts of palm and celery hearts. It's so good. She filled the middle of the round aspic mold with cottage cheese and served large water crackers with it and big glasses of ice tea. Yum. Perfect lunch for a hot summer day. It also leaves room for a heavy sweet dessert like berry shortcake.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 22, 2012 12:37:17 PM PDT
A. Lyons says:
Mrs. Birdie's Bread
2 packages of dry yeast in a small bowl with 1/2 cup warm water and 1 teaspoon brown sugar.
Gently heat 1/2 cup milk in saucepan and add 2 tablesoons brown sugar, 1 teaspoon salt, 3 tablespoons wheat germ and 3 tablespoons vegetable oil. Heat until sugar is disolved.
Empty saucepan into large bowl. Add 1/2 cup cold water. When cooler add yeast mixture.
Stir in 2 cups whole wheat flour. Gradually add 1 cup unbleached flour. Knead 10 minutes on floured board and set into bowl rubbed with oil so dough doesn't stick. Cover with towel and place in warm spot to rise for one hour. Punch down and then let it rest for five minutes.
Cut dough in two pieces and place each one in oiled pan and set aside covered in a warm place to rise again for about an hour. Remove towels.
Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Wait five minutes and put pans on middle shelf and bake 30 minutes. Cool pans on cooling racks before taking loaves from pans. Cool a few minutes more and then cut with serrated knife. My four teens and I ate both loaves with butter and honey or apple butter. Wonderful! My neighbor loved it so much her son made it every other night and she made his school lunches from it.
ENJOY! Alice

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 22, 2012 12:42:03 PM PDT
A. Lyons:
Aunt Marybelle of Rehobath Beach Delaware, tomato aspic:

Can you share the recipe here??? Sounds YUMMY!!!
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Discussion in:  Cooking forum
Participants:  72
Total posts:  407
Initial post:  May 13, 2012
Latest post:  Sep 3, 2013

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