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20 year old Schwinn Mirada Mtn bike needs tires


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Showing 1-7 of 7 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Jul 26, 2012 8:53:00 AM PDT
My tires are cracking and they say 126 1 1/2 on them, but they were replacement tires from the originals. I can't find them. Are they the correct tires and where do I get them?

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 26, 2012 2:14:46 PM PDT
None says:
Go to a bike store, with the bike (or at least one of your rims, assuming both rims are the same, otherwise take both) have them look at/measure the rims, and supply you with the correct tires. Alternatively you could try looking up Schwinn Mirada and try to find the spec's, but if you're not the original owner, it may be tough to tell if those are the original wheels, and the match is not guaranteed. Because of differences in where measurements are taken, that is, what landmarks are used in determining what tire will fit on a bike, understand that 1 1/2 inches is not the same size as 1.5 inches, for example, when it comes to bicycle tire sizes. It's best to get the assistance of experts in this, not to listen to whatever shade-tree bike mechanics on Amazon tell you. Without having a bicycle expert to actually measure the wheel, you're just guessing.

If you're worried you'll feel guilty using their expertise, and then coming back to buy the tires on Amazon, good! You should. You're essentially stealing from them, using their knowledge and expertise they're providing on the assumption you'll patronize their shop or service, and then going to buy it somewhere else to save a few dollars.

If I know what I want, I buy it from Amazon. If I have to go try it on, or play with it in the store, unless it's so much more expensive there that they're obviously gouging me on price... I'll buy it locally, even though that means paying sales tax, (although that might not be a difference for much longer the way things seem to be headed,) and having to subsidize them maintaining a store-front, customer service people, etc.

They're providing a service, and it's worth money. In your case, you don't seem to know what size tires your bicycle needs. Why not find a reputable local shop, take the bike to them, and help keep local stores that employ people like these upon whom you may depend?

It seems obvious from your post here you need the help, let them help you. No one here is likely to be able to interpret from the limited info you provided what kind of tires you need.

Good luck, and happy cycling.

Posted on Jul 26, 2012 7:23:23 PM PDT
B. Kaufman says:
I'd guess you read the text wrong and the tire is a 26"x1.5" standard mountain bike tire. You can take the wheel off, or take your chances. There are new standards for tire sizes, and if you are going to ride a bike, it would be good to learn the new standards. If you want a precise spec look for the ETRTO/ISO Number, which should be 40-559, if is indeed a standard mountain bike tire. Note the first size in the ETRTO spec is the width, which is the least important number, The number that ought to make you sweat is the 559 part, get that wrong and you could kill someone, possible even your self. Get it right and fairly close on the first two digits, and you are probably okay. Look at the SCHWALBE Tire website for more info on modern bicycle tires. Note the following portion of their tire size table, and see that there are several (like 10) different wheel diameters for 26" tires (559, 571, 584, 590, 597, 622, 609, 630, 635, 642). English Middleweights and French touring bikes are very different sizes.

559 is a standard diameter, run of the mill MTB tire today. 40 is approximately 1.5 inches wide. Your bicycle will probably be fine with 35-45mm wide tires.

35-559 26 x 1.35
37-559 26 x 1 5/8 x 1 3/8
40-559 26 x 1.50
44-559 26 x 1.625 26 x 1.50/1.75
47-559 26 x 1.75 26 x 1.85/1.90
50-559 26 x 1.90 26 x 1.95 26 x 1.90/2.00 26 x 2.00/2.10
54-559 26 x 1.95 26 x 2.10 26 x 2.125
57-559 26 x 2.125 26 x 2.20/2.25
60-559 26 x 2.35
62-559 26 x 2.50
20-571 26 x 3/4 650 x 20C
23-571 26 x 7/8 650 x 22C
40-571 26 x 1 1/2 CS 26 x 1 3/8 x 1 1/2 NL 26 x 1 5/8 x 1 1/2 650 x 35C 650 x 38C
47-571 26 x 1 3/4 650 CS confort 650 x 45C
54-571 26 x 2 x 1 3/4 650 x 50C
28-584 26 x 1 1/8 x 1 1/2 650 x 28B
32-584 650 x 32B
35-584 26 x 1 3/8 x 1 1/2 650 x 35B 650B Standard
37-584 26 x 1 1/2 x 1 3/8 26 x 1 1/2 650 x 35B
40-584 26 x 1 5/8 x 1 1/2 650 x 42B 650B Semi-Confort 650B 1/2 Ballon
20-590 650 x 20A
25-590 26 x 1 1/8, 1 1/4 26 x 1 3/8 - 1 1/4 650 x 32A
28-590 26 x 1 1/8 650 x 28A
32-590 26 x 1 1/4 26 x 1 3/8 x1 1/4 650 x 32A
35-590 26 x 1 3/8 650 x 35A
37-590 26 x 1 3/8 650 x 35A 650A
40-590 26 x 1.50 28 x 1 3/8 x 1 1/2 650 x 38A
44-590
32-597 26 x 1 1/4
27" 40-609 27 x 1 1/2
20-630 27 x 3/4
22-630 27 x 7/8
25-630 27 x 1.00 27 x 1 1/16
28-630 27 x 1 1/8 27 x 1 1/4 Fifty 27 x 1 1/4
32-630 27 x 1 1/4
28/32-630 27 x 1 1/4
35-630 27 x 1 3/8
28" 18-622 28 x 3/4 700 x 18C
19-622 700 x 19C
20-622 28 x 3/4 700 x 20C
22-622 28 x 7/8 700 x 22C
23-622 28 x 7/8 700 x 23C
25-622 28 x 1.00, 1 1/16 700 x 25C
30-622 28 x 1.20 700 x 28C
28-622 28 x 1 5/8 x 1 1/8 700 x 30C
32-622 28 x 15/8 x 11/4 700 x 32C 700C COURSE
35-622 28 x 15/8 x 13/8 700 x 35C
37-622 28 x 1 5/8 x 1 3/8 700 x 35C
40-622 28 x 1.50 28 x 1 5/8 x 1 1/2 700 x 38C
42-622 28 x 1.60 700 x 40C
44-622 28 x 1.625 700 x 42C
47-622 28 x 1.75 700 x 45C
50-622 28 x 1.90 28 x 2.00
60-622 28 x 2.35
32-635 28 x 1 1/2 x 1 1/8 770 x 28B 700 x 28B 770B COURSE
40-635 28 x 1 1/2 28 x 1 1/2 x 1 3/8 700 x 38B 700 x 35B 700 Standard 700B Standard
44-635 28 x 15/8 x 11/2 700 x 40/42B
28-642 28 x 1 3/8 x 1 1/8 700 x 28A
37-642 28 x 1 3/8 700 x 35A

Posted on Jul 29, 2012 3:36:09 PM PDT
These tires would work great: CST Selecta Tire 26x1.75 Kevlar Belt Reflective

Posted on Aug 1, 2012 6:47:26 AM PDT
A Reader says:
Go to a bike store with the wheels. Schwinn of Chicago notoriously used rims that were unique to their brand, slightly bigger than industry standard. Forced you to buy tires at the Schwinn store. After they went broke and the brand became Chinese, this kind of nonsense ended. 20 years old is not really an old bike. Right now I am overhauling a bike that I first put together from used parts back in 1981.

Posted on Aug 7, 2012 7:21:54 AM PDT
Gregory says:
Go to a bike shop. I buy lots of bike stuff on Amazon, but installing tires without getting flats is a little tricky. So, let your bike shop do it. It'll only cost you a few dollars extra, and you won't have to worry about getting the correct size.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 9, 2012 1:19:36 PM PDT
Picard321 says:
Others here will help with the tires. Recommend you get 3 so you have a shelf spare. Get a new set of tubes also as the old ones are probably as bad as the tires. Sort out presta vs shraeder valves before buying the tubes. And a new set of rim strips to protect the tubes from the spot heads. Wouldn't be a bad time to give the wheels a spin to see it they need a few wobbles taken out of them by a local bike shop that has a good wheel builder..
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Discussion in:  Cycling forum
Participants:  7
Total posts:  7
Initial post:  Jul 26, 2012
Latest post:  Aug 9, 2012

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