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Picture books for kids


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In reply to an earlier post on Aug 21, 2007 11:39:03 AM PDT
Ms. Taylor, while it looks like you really poured your heart into your book, and obviously (given the positive reviews) it has touched many people, which is wonderful, I must say that as a reviewer I would have a hard time recommending it to parents. In my experience, it is almost invariable that a picture book's literary merit tends to suffer in inverse proportion to its didacticism. Even when you have the best of intentions, such as your goal of giving children self-confidence, anything written with a goal other than simply good storytelling in mind tends to get derailed by those very ambitions. Just my two cents.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 21, 2007 2:56:16 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 21, 2007 3:07:06 PM PDT
Hi Jennifer:
Thank you very much for you candidness, as your opinion seems to have more merit in this day and age then in my time. Actually in part, I agree with your advise for goal setting as that is not my intent for my book. I did not write my book to be an instructional tool and I do not recall that I claimed to have done so( as I would not consider myself qualified to render such a task) and I would not recommend anyone use my book for anything more than an enjoyable story where the main charactor learns a hearty lesson about life around him/her. Actually I grew up with picture books, like "The Ugly Duckling". Simular to mine.
The old "Golden Books" series are classics today and they were all geared toward the "Golden Rule". I invite you to read my book to see that it is not meant to be an instructional tool, it's just a special declaration to remember during lifes little potholes.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 21, 2007 4:04:45 PM PDT
In that case I would like to apologize and give you my most supportive wishes. While I may not like overt didacticism in picture books, I wholeheartedly support well-written *stories* that help kids cope in an increasingly confusing and difficult world. I will indeed put your book on my "to-read" list. :-)

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 21, 2007 6:11:46 PM PDT
Hi Everyone,

Some of my daughter's recent favorite picture books have been these:

"Dragon" By J.G. Eastwood

"Good Night Moon" by Margaret Wise Brown and Clement Hurd

"How I Became a Pirate" by Melinda Long and David Shannon

"Gulliver's Travels"

"If You Gave a Mouse a Cookie" By Laura Joffe Numeroff and Felicia Bond

"Max Words" By Kate Banks and Boris Kulikov

"Jamberry" by Bruce Degen

"How Do Dinosaurs Say Good Night?" by Jane Yolen and Mark Teague

We have a long list in our library but these are the newest additions. My daughter is six and we are reading the Magical Tree series at the moment. Take care now.

Best Wishes.
Shannon

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 21, 2007 9:47:47 PM PDT
coomacka says:
I always been partial to the Berenstain Bears,
Don

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 21, 2007 10:30:40 PM PDT
My daughter likes your books too! Coomacka Island are wonderful books. I am working on my review of your books. You are also on my friend's list on myspace lol. Wish you much success!

Best Wishes,
Shannon

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 22, 2007 6:13:42 PM PDT
Hey if everyone could let me know what you think of my book it would be great thanks.
It is
A Dragon's Birth
Terry

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 22, 2007 6:36:22 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Aug 22, 2007 6:47:34 PM PDT
As a reviewer? My initial impression is that you would not want to hear what I would have to say about it.

The *least* of my criticisms would be that it needs to be proofread and copy-edited. In the first page alone there was redundancy, questionable grammar, spelling mistakes, and the language was cliched and didn't flow well.

Please understand that I'm not saying this out of meanness, but rather as an advocate for children's literacy. In my experience (and I read dozens of picture books every week for my research), the quality of self-published picture books tends to be highly overestimated by their authors, and can rarely hold a candle to even those produced by the smallest independent publishing houses.

It is wonderful to want to share your stories with children, but being a great bedtime storyteller is not the same thing as being a great author.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 22, 2007 7:05:52 PM PDT
Hi Terry,

I looked at your book and you have the start of a wonderful story. I believe it does need some work though. It is a choppy and there are quite a few errors. You need to find an editor to help you with this. I wish you luck with your dragon story.

Best Wishes,
Shannon

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 22, 2007 7:13:02 PM PDT
Jennifer,

I have a question to ask you but I do not want to ask it here on this forum. My email address is srstories@gmail.com

The question is nothing rude or improper. It is just a question for you and I do not want to be judged by a whole group of people.

Best Wishes,
Shannon

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 22, 2007 7:36:09 PM PDT
Jennifer,

I hope my question was not out of line. I hope you have a nice evening.

Best Wishes,
Shannon

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 22, 2007 7:49:01 PM PDT
Not at all. I'm glad you asked, and have already responded in e-mail.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 22, 2007 8:57:59 PM PDT
J. Newfield says:
My 6 year old son loves Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus by Mo Willems and Mr Pusskins: A Love Story by Sam Lloyd. I highly recommend Mo Willem's books because they make my son roar with laughter and when a story book can do that...you know you have a winner.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 23, 2007 8:08:41 AM PDT
Thank you all for your feedback. The book is actually doing pretty well. It is the first in a series of 13 I've written in this genre.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 23, 2007 12:18:32 PM PDT
E. Rothstein says:
"The Giving Tree" by Shel Silversteen is my all time favorite and a classsic. New favorite, "The Only Boy In Ballet Class" by Denise Gruska.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 23, 2007 12:21:30 PM PDT
E. Rothstein says:
"The Giving Tree" by Shel Silversteen is my all time favorite and a classsic. New favorite, "The Only Boy In Ballet Class" by Denise Gruska.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 24, 2007 10:34:20 AM PDT
UDO WAHN says:
Check out " Cabo & Coral Go Surfing!
Teaches resoect for the beach, sharing and " Aloha Spirit! Beautifully illustrated, adults love it too.
partial proceeds to Surfrider Foudation

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 30, 2007 10:54:43 AM PDT
UDO WAHN says:
Highly acclaimed, " Cabo & Coral go Surfing!" ALoha SPirit, respect the beach and sharing!

Partial proceeds go to Surfrider Foundation.
Your reply to UDO WAHN's post:
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
 

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 6, 2007 8:51:04 AM PDT
Hi Jennifer: I am also a first-time author and am publishing a children's picture book designed to inspire girls to own their own business. I would love to have input. More info on businessangelpress.com.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 6, 2007 8:59:10 AM PDT
Ms. Nowell: It is certainly an admirable idea, though I really couldn't comment on the books themselves without seeing them. If you wanted to discuss this further, please feel free to contact me at chapterverse@gmail.com.

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 6, 2007 1:39:57 PM PDT
Hi. Funny to find this. I just recently posted this entry on my book pages (I'm author David Michael Slater):

I'm often asked by prospective picture book authors what my favorite picture books are, so I thought I'd venture my first "Top 10."

This list betrays my bias for story, which I know very well is not what sells most PICTURE books. But that's me. I rarely, if ever, buy a book because I love the art if I don't care for the story (or can't find one). In fact, I'll admit sometimes, if I like the story, to reading it the first time scarcely even noticing the pictures. This is not to say I'm indifferent to them.

Anyway, here's my list, in no particular order:

Officer Buckle and Gloria by Peggy Rathman
My Friend Rabbit by Eric Rohmann
I Lost My Bear by Jules Feiffer
The Signmaker's Assistant by Tedd Arnold
Parts by Tedd Arnold
Horton Hatches the Egg by Dr. Seuss
The Dot by Peter Reynolds
Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak
The Brother's Promise by Frances Harber
Mrs. Biddlebox by Linda Smith

What do you think?

Best and thanks for reading,

David Michael Slater
www.davidmichaelslater.com

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 7, 2007 2:22:30 AM PDT
Angela Cater says:
As an illustrator myself, I love the books of Jan Brett. Her animals are so realistic that you want to reach out and stroke them. My particular favourite is "Comet's Nine Lives" for its humour and the gentle happy ending. I also really like Jane Hissey's books about 'Old Bear' The coloured pencil illustrations are exquisite.

Posted on Dec 6, 2011 11:28:01 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 6, 2011 11:36:02 PM PST
J. Howell says:
Hate to self promote....but a book can really get smothered on Amazon. If your little one is around 8 years old than please look up "The Space Adventures of Captain Tomahawk" on Amazon. It is only available on the e-readers and was recently optimized for the new Kindle Fire. It's one of the only 3D books available, other than the ones from pixar.

Anyhow.....again, sorry about the self promotion.....I poured a lot of years into creating it, and would love to get it out to kids all over.......thanks
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This discussion

Discussion in:  Early Reader forum
Participants:  28
Total posts:  48
Initial post:  Oct 30, 2006
Latest post:  Dec 6, 2011

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