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Help! Need a deep read!


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Showing 1-25 of 119 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Oct 19, 2008 3:07:57 PM PDT
Katie says:
Whenever people tell me they have a book they think I'd like, I'm often more disappointed then not! it's because I can read a wide variety of books and love ones that are totally unrelated.
What I really like is a dark aspect hanging over a story, and I love to see how the light shines through the darkness. How there is good that can come out of bad. I also appreciate a certain amount of romance.

Books/authors I like
-Graceling
-The Host
-The Hunger Games
-Twilight Saga
-My Sister's Keeper
-Harry Potter Series
-Tamora Pierce's books
-Argeneau(sp?) Vampires by Lyndsay Sands
-A Great and Terrible Beauty
-Jennifer Crusie's books

I hate when my favorite people die--My Sister's Keeper is an exception

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 19, 2008 6:52:14 PM PDT
Timothy Fish says:
I have a book you might like. It is called "For the Love of a Devil."
For the Love of a Devil

The dark aspect of it is that a man's wife leaves him and through a string of bad choices she slips into worse and worse situations. The "light shines through" aspect is that he never gives up on her. While I won't reveal the end, I think you would like the ending.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 19, 2008 7:46:07 PM PDT
K. Walgrave says:
You should try Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card.
The Uglies Series by Scott Westerfeld is also good.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 21, 2008 11:56:07 AM PDT
Aja says:
I recommend The Far Pavilions by MM Kaye.

Its long, some find that a chore, but the story is beautiful, deep, gripping. An epic love story and personal battle, set in exotic India. LOVE it!

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 21, 2008 3:22:58 PM PDT
E. Bird says:
You want "The Changeover" by Margaret Mahy. Trust me. You do. You also will want "The Hollow Kingdom" by Clare B. Dunkle. Actually, you'll probably want to read "The Hollow Kingdom" first.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 21, 2008 7:47:53 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Oct 21, 2008 7:48:59 PM PDT
favored6 says:
i don't know what types of books you like but Romance inc by Jocelyn Raines is good. things starts out bad for the main character but at the end everything works out. also caucasia by danzy senna. thats all i can think of off the top of my head

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 22, 2008 9:04:40 AM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on Aug 25, 2010 6:36:17 AM PDT]

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 22, 2008 10:05:48 AM PDT
Outlander by Diana Gabaldon (and the following books)
It'll make you laugh and cry and fall in love.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 31, 2008 1:52:51 AM PDT
From what you say, I am sure would like 'Tides of Change', by Deborah Brewer. It is romance, with plenty of movement and unexpected twists, and very heartfelt, or as you put it, deep. The characters come alive in your imagination and you find yourself empathising with them. Definitely worth reading, and it leaves you with a real sense of satisaction at the end.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 31, 2008 5:24:42 AM PDT
A dark pall hanging over the story? Djuna Barnes "Nightwood" seems like a natural for that request. In any case, it's superb literature.

pat

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 31, 2008 8:59:42 AM PDT
Linda Gould says:
Don't read The Story of Edgar Sawtelle!
I did like Crossed, a lot. by Nicole Galland. Historical fiction, 4th Crusade.

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 31, 2008 10:18:14 AM PDT
best ever deep read:
James JOyce Ulysses

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 1, 2008 4:38:39 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Dec 27, 2008 12:46:33 PM PST
Doni Tamblyn says:
Katherine D:

From your description of your preferences, you will adore THE MASTER PLANETS by Donald Gallinger. This book blows every debut novel I've ever read out of the water! The story is highly unique -- an up-and-coming rock 'n' roll star in the 70s who discovers his mother's secret past in Nazi-occupied Poland. It sounds lurid and sensationalistic, but is actually deeply profound. You blast through this page-turner, only to realize at the end that you've just read a truly beautiful book. It's masterful.

I can't wait till enough people have read it to create a discussion group on Amazon. In the meantime, I've suggested it to my two local book clubs to consider for our spring selections. Patience is a virtue, I keep telling myself....

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 1, 2008 11:27:47 AM PDT
K.J. Parker's brilliant, dark, brooding, vast epics: The Fencer Trilogy, the Scavenger Trilogy, and the Engineer Trilogy. All nine books are candidates for being considered great literature regardless of genre - and yet adventurous, romantic, tragic, comic, philosophical books I could not put down. Parker took weeks of reading time from my life - but left me well-rewarded.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 1, 2008 12:20:45 PM PDT
Booksiedaisy says:
You would love the Robin Hardy books. Start with Chataine's Guardian. Happy Reading!

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 1, 2008 1:10:40 PM PDT
S. A. Davis says:
As the author, I think you might like Iman's Isle - A Tale of Lost Treasures. It is all about light shining through darkness and has a little romance. I'll even send you a free copy if you're interested. Or you can download the audiobook for free from Lulu.com

Best of luck.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 1, 2008 1:25:23 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Nov 1, 2008 2:11:40 PM PDT
Hi! I'm Melanie Nowak, a new author. If you have a Kindle you might be interested in my new series Almost Human. I hope you don't mind the self promotion, but my series is a Vampire Romance that sounds just like what you are looking for. While it has romance, action/adventure and humor, it also uses intelligent characters to explore very thought provoking situations dealing with ethics, religion, morality & mortality. You can look it up under my name or the series name.

Almost Human - Melanie Nowak

There you can read the more thorough descriptions, reviews and discussions and see if you'd be interested. I hope you like it!

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 1, 2008 2:05:27 PM PDT
S. Nathan says:
You might be interested in Numenon by Sandy Nathan. This is the story of what happens when the richest man in the world meets a great Native American saga. The word "numenon" means the thing in itself, as set out by philosopher Immanuel Kant in the 1700s. That's about as deep as it gets. Check out the sale page for lots of really good reviews. You can find out more on the author's web site (I am the author, by the way):
http://www.sandynathan.com/numenon.htm It's won 2 national awards, one in Religious Fiction, the other in Visionary Fiction.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 1, 2008 2:26:49 PM PDT
I can think of two books that would be a "deep read" you might want to try. The first is Blindness by Jose Saramago and the second is Child 44 by Tom Rob Smith. Both provide food for serious thought. Neither is light reading material, but each will have you hooked after the first few pages. Each explores the good and the evil in the world and the light at the end of the tunnel, but these books are very different in subject matter and writing style.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 1, 2008 3:05:40 PM PDT
P. McCole says:
The Outlander series is my absolute favorite romance/history with some fantasy thrown in.
Ccan't wait for the next one.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 1, 2008 3:07:22 PM PDT
P. McCole says:
The Outlander series is my absolute favorite romance/history with some fantasy thrown in.
Ccan't wait for the next one.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 1, 2008 3:18:17 PM PDT
If you want a deep but very compact read, then my novel FILL MY EYES may be the ticket. It is constantly twisting, shifting and raising questions that get answered as the book progresses or is resolved in the explosive ending. It is not a fantasy, horror book (unless you consider what is going on today a horror story), and there is no romance. The story is told in several different first person accounts, has a steamy Southern Gothic touch to the prologue, and cannot be read casually due to the heavy symbolism. Due to the tight structure, at times, every little sentence as a meaning all its own to coin and twist an old song.

The book is a social commentary on our blighted society set 50 years ago to add to the shock value (back then these things did not happen). It tackles a large subject but utilizes an intimate setting to involve the reader. It has been reviewed as a book that cannot be put down and extremely vivid like painting word pictures. This isn't a pitch for the book (although it sounds like one). I am just giving you a suggestion.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 2, 2008 9:35:47 AM PST
Now that I think about it, The Brothers Karamazov (Dostoyevsky) is yet another natural response to this request -- it's dark, deep, but in many ways it's also a real hoot. Those boys' dad was a genuine scoundrel of The First Water and we are all delighted when he's murdered! (that's not a spoiler... the story springboards from that singular event which happens about 1/3 of the way through).

*.*

p.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 2, 2008 9:56:08 AM PST
I read this book and loved it. I asked the author if I could post a blurb on my genre threads, and thought I'd include it here. This book is like stepping into a painting and seeing a story unfold through a ten-year-olds eyes. Also it's part novelized memoir. The Author 'Andrew' is 'Drew' in the story.

-------

'Lantern's Passage' - By Andrew L. MacNair, This book is based on true incidents that happened when he was a boy. He is 'Drew' in the book.

***Drew MacLaren remembers the summers of 1958 and 1959 in the Outer Banks more clearly than any in his life-the months when super heroes streaked across the pages of comic books, and the hurricane winds of Big Leo ripped cottages from their pilings, when Clarisse Silver went violently insane, and his best friend, Maggie, was accused of murdering her mother.

On a gray, windy afternoon Drew secretly watches Maggie Silver crying. He listens, terrified, as a voice shrieks inside her cottage and dishes of oatmeal shatter against the wall. He knows nothing about his neighbor, only, like all children instinctively do, that the she is poor and older than he is. He knows that her brother, Skeeter, has had polio and rolls around their porches on a low board with caster wheels. But from the moment he sees her smile rise up through her tears, he becomes determined to learn more of who she is.

Drew and Maggie become friends, share secrets together, and he can only watch painfully as she sinks from the burden of caring for her mentally-ill mother and physically dependent brother.

When Maggie's mother is found suffocated after the most violent storm in a decade, all of Nags Head believes the besieged daughter has committed the murder. She has disappeared into the wreckage, but Drew knows she is innocent. He and Skeeter have the answers in front of them. Convincing adults, however, is not always as easy as it should be.

Seen through the eyes of a bright and insatiably curious eleven-year-old, Lantern's Passage is a weaving of genuine characters, children and adults we have all known. It is a story of mystery and suspense, of prejudice and hatred, of love and death, but primarily it tells us of the sweet and cruel lessons every child passing into adulthood comes to understand. And it is certain to echo a chord within ever reader's heart.***

Here's the link:
Lantern's Passage

Esme.

In reply to an earlier post on Nov 2, 2008 12:53:25 PM PST
Lynne Hersh says:
Kindred by Octavia Butleris a great piece of literature. I have read most of the books on your list and Kindred is a different genre - not science fiction but different and deep.
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Discussion in:  Fiction forum
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Initial post:  Oct 19, 2008
Latest post:  Apr 30, 2012

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